Atlantis Online
December 19, 2014, 11:26:15 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Remains of ancient civilisation discovered on the bottom of a lake
http://en.rian.ru/analysis/20071227/94372640.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Alexandria built to celebrate birthday of Alexander the Great

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Alexandria built to celebrate birthday of Alexander the Great  (Read 117 times)
Danielle Gorree
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4202



« on: October 21, 2012, 02:46:36 am »



Alexander bust from British Museum. Image Wikimedia
Alexandria built to celebrate birthday of Alexander the Great
Print

Alexander the Great founded Alexandria in 331 BC and an examination of the topography of the city today allows the identification of the essential elements of the original urban system as it was laid out. It is suggested that the site was chosen for religious and symbolic reasons just as much as for commercial and topographic requirements.
Photograph of the early 19th century showing the Canopic road, looking west (courtesy C. Pallini).
Report Spam   Logged

Social Buttons

Danielle Gorree
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4202



« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2012, 02:47:41 am »



Photograph of the early 19th century showing the Canopic road, looking west (courtesy C. Pallini).
Report Spam   Logged
Danielle Gorree
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4202



« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2012, 02:48:48 am »

Alexandria becomes the prototype for a series of Hellenistic towns designed as ‘king’s towns’ that aimed to make explicit the divine power of their founder, Alexander of Macedon.
Leo and the location of the star Regulus.




Leo and the star Regulus.
A grid aligned on the Sun and Regulus

The researchers Giulio Magli and Luisa Ferro with the Politecnico of Milan claim in a paper published in the Oxford Journal of Archaeology that the orientation of the orthogonal grid, which was based on a main longitudinal axis of the city (Canopic road), show that this axis is orientated to the rising sun on the day of Alexander the Great’s birth, July 20th, 356 BC by the Julian calendar. At the time of foundation, ‘King’s Star’ Regulus was also rising along that same alignment, and this bright star was known later as ‘Qalb al-Asad‘, which is Arabic for ‘the heart of the lion’, a perhaps obvious connection with the Lion of Macedon.

According to a comment on the science website Physorg, the sun’s declination changes only about a fifth of a degree each day around July 20th, so there would be about 4-5 days when the sunrise is at declination +20.5°, +/- 0.5° and aligned with the road. The alignment repeats, with the sunrise inching northward day by day, around May 22nd.
Alexandria, reconstruction scheme of the original town plan. 1) Canopic road 2) Heptastadion 3) Serapeum 4) Imperial palace 5) Isle of Pharos (@ Luisa Ferro).
Report Spam   Logged
Danielle Gorree
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4202



« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2012, 02:49:50 am »




Alexandria, reconstruction scheme of the original town plan. 1) Canopic road 2) Heptastadion 3) Serapeum 4) Imperial palace 5) Isle of Pharos (@ Luisa Ferro).
Report Spam   Logged
Danielle Gorree
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4202



« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2012, 02:50:36 am »

The researchers looked at other examples such as the town of Selucia on the Tigris and the funeral monument of Antiochos I at Nemrut Dag in Anatolia to investigate whether this was just coincidence. With Alexandria and Selucia at the same latitude, the sun with a flat horizon would set in alignment with the longitudinal axis at Selucia the very same days as rising in Alexandria. Due to the slight difference in latitude the sun was actually setting along this direction on the days around July 27th, with a slight displacement, but in any case still very close to the date of birth of Alexander. At Nemrut Dag, the plinths holding the colossal statues in the eastern terrace point to sunrise on July 23rd (and May 22nd) – in addition the terrace also points to the rising of Regulus, which also occurred around the 23rd July at the Nemrut Dag latitude during the reign of Antiochos I.
The researchers are certain that aligning the main street and thus the city itself with Alexander’s birth date would have been a way to highlight his power. They plan to study other cities that were part of Alexander’s vast empire to see if they can repeat these alignments.

Source: Oxford Journal of Archaeology

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/10/2012/alexandria-built-to-celebrate-birthday-of-alexander-the-great
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines