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Writing prehistoric Glozel

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Author Topic: Writing prehistoric Glozel  (Read 82 times)
warenghien
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« on: March 03, 2012, 06:01:06 am »

Hello

You know maybe not, but I tabled in the BNF (Bibliothèque Nationale de France in Paris) in May 1996, the book, I have since made CD : - Manifeste Scholiastique de: GLOZEL Clef de l'Esotérisme Occidental: "Manifesto of Scholiastique: Key of Glozel 'Western Esotericism ", where I translate the writing artifacts and plates Glozel. You can see examples on the blog: Glozel_enfin_traduit.eklablog.com ..., or tap in the Net: Blog de Odhinn-Hermodr

Yours!  Smiley

The origin of the name of the locality Glozel

    In dialect, in some regions of France including the Bourbonnais, in the initial C is often pronounced [g], and conversely the G in the final position is pronounced [c / k], example plum: "Reine-Claude" is called "Reine-Glaude."
Thus, for the original meaning of the term Glozel, one can find the root in the following words, taken from the local dialect and / or regional speech:
- Clos: "cultivated paddocks" (in langue d'oil, Celtic Klos: "close", & Gallic Clos: "closed / piece of land").
- Claussel: frequentative derivative Claus, the ending "-el" is a diminutive, is the equivalent of Closerie: "farm" (in the South and Central France).
- Cluzel: "corrals / cave (which is a closed)."

    The Champ (field) Duranthon, of Durantons and / or Duranton, literally "ford of the forest" in Celtic, takes its name cultic of the words Dur: "oak / forest", Ath: "ford", & Ona: "on". The Celtic Goddess Dana was cross the ford to the dead on his horse. Or literally "brave and strong", by translation through the Celtic Dur: "brave", teangorlach Dùr: "drive", Ona "on", & Tun: "fort", to Dunon: "fortress" lexeme French words Dune and Dunette.
That is to say that the "modern" French appellation: Champ des Morts: "fields of the dead" is not at all suited to Celtic religious concept to the naming Duranthon.

O-H de Warenghien

« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 06:08:27 am by warenghien » Report Spam   Logged

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