Atlantis Online
June 24, 2019, 03:10:23 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Remains of ancient civilisation discovered on the bottom of a lake
http://en.rian.ru/analysis/20071227/94372640.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

In Addition to His Racist Newsletters, Ron Paul Voted Against MLK Day

Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: In Addition to His Racist Newsletters, Ron Paul Voted Against MLK Day  (Read 204 times)
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« on: January 18, 2012, 02:39:42 am »

In Addition to His Racist Newsletters, Ron Paul Voted Against MLK Day
January 10, 2012 11 Comments
   


*Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul – who’s on the ballot in today’s New Hamshire primary – did not only produce racist newsletters, but he voted against marking Martin Luther King Day as a holiday, according to The Root. *

Paul, who this weekend said that King was his hero, may have just done that to help the recovery from his racist newsletters scandal.

While many of his supporters link to a file claiming he did vote for the day, a few, newly discovered facts say otherwise:

    But this actually isn’t the bill for the holiday. The text doesn’t even claim that. More importantly, the date is wrong. This vote was taken on December 5, 1979. The vote for the King holiday was actually taken on November 13, 1979:

    The bill was called up in the House on Tuesday, November 13, 1979 … When the final vote was taken, 252 Members voted for the bill and 133 against — five votes short of the two-thirds needed for passage.

    I’m sorry to report that one of those Nay votes, as you can see here, was cast by one Ronald Paul. I’m sorry to further report that Paul again voted no on the 1983 bill that passed.

Read more at The Root.

http://www.eurweb.com/2012/01/in-addition-to-his-racist-nerwsletters-ron-paul-voted-against-mlk-day/

http://www.theroot.com/buzz/ron-paul-did-not-vote-mlk-day?wpisrc=root_more_news
Report Spam   Logged

Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2012, 02:42:07 am »


Herb Silverman


Professor emeritus, College of Charleston; Founder and president of the Secular Coalition for America; Author, “Candidate Without a Prayer"

Martin Luther King and the Republican Race For Righteousness


If I believed in a god, and one with a sense of humor, I would think she had a big chuckle over timing the South Carolina Republican primary for the same week the nation celebrates Martin Luther King Day.

On May 2, 2000, South Carolina became the last state to make King's birthday an official state holiday. But South Carolina also then created another official state holiday on May 10 -- Confederate Memorial Day. Prior to this legislation, state employees had the choice of celebrating the birthday of Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, or Martin Luther King.

Some of our South Carolina politicians think nothing of rewriting history, even when they can easily be caught. For instance, Congressman Joe Wilson claimed that he spearheaded the effort to have King's birthday recognized. A friend of Wilson's from his state legislature days said Wilson must have been confused about which holiday he supported, which was really Confederate Memorial Day. When confronted with circumstantial evidence, Wilson said his memory must have failed him. (This is the same Joe Wilson who famously yelled "You lie!" at the country's first African-American president during a speech to a joint session of Congress.)

Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul voted against Martin Luther King Day both in 1979 and 1983, when the bill passed. In one of his newsletters, Paul referred to the holiday as "Hate Whitey Day." Paul, who is viewed as the presidential candidate least likely to lie, claimed that he neither wrote nor read the newsletters that bore his name.

Martin Luther King is not the controversial figure he once was in South Carolina, with racism today subtler and less institutionally sanctioned. But in 1962, at the height of the civil rights movement led by King, the Confederate battle flag was placed atop the State Capitol by vote of an all-white legislature. In 2000, a so-called compromise moved the Confederate flag to the Capitol grounds. When the NAACP continued its boycott of South Carolina, state senator Arthur Ravenel, a member of Sons of Confederate Veterans, called the NAACP the "National Association for Retarded People." He later apologized--to the mentally handicapped for comparing them to the NAACP.

Presidential candidates are often asked what they think of this flag situation. Former candidate John McCain went back and forth about whether it was a states rights' issue or a symbol of racism and slavery. In 2008, Mitt Romney took a stronger stance, saying he didn't think the Confederate flag should be flown at all. I'll be interested to hear if he changes his mind about this, too, in time for Saturday's election.

The safest, if not the most courageous, answer for national candidates is to call the Confederate flag an issue for South Carolinians to decide. In fact, last month Newt Gingrich said at a town hall meeting, "I have a very strong opinion: it's up to the people of South Carolina." He added that he is opposed to segregation and slavery. Well, that's a relief. But I'm quite sure that Martin Luther King would disagree with Newt about what he just told a Charleston audience was the biggest domestic threat to America: "Removing God from the public arena."

In 1998, fiscally conservative Charleston County councilman Tim Scott insisted on posting a Ten Commandments plaque on the wall of County Council chambers, ignoring advice that he would lose the anticipated legal challenge. Scott insisted that the display was needed to remind residents of moral absolutes. After the plaque went up, the Charleston Post and Courier asked Councilman Scott if he could name all the Commandments. He couldn't. As expected, the court declared the display unconstitutional and handed taxpayers a substantial bill for legal costs.

Councilman Scott was not laughed off the political stage. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2010, the first African-American Republican in South Carolina to serve in Congress. He is now a tea party favorite, and all Republican presidential candidates are seeking his endorsement. He is my congressional representative, though I can't say that he represents my views. I wonder what Rev. Martin Luther King would have thought about all this.
Report Spam   Logged
Volitzer
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 11110



« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2012, 05:12:39 pm »

Show me where Ron Paul had racist newsletters ?

Sounds like Huntsman supporters conning people again.

You make claims that Ron Paul is racist then prove it.

If you don't agree with his libertarian views fine but don't accuse people her of doing stuff without any proof.
Report Spam   Logged
Volitzer
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 11110



« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 07:11:52 pm »

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,30085.msg241076.html#msg241076
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 09:24:17 pm »

Sure, I know how you feel, Volitzer, it's hard to accept that a candidate you support is a racist. The following articles will provide all the proof that anyone could ever need that the man is a bigot.

And, after you read all this information, I will be expecting an apology on your behalf for supporting this racist, or an explanation as to why you still think he is worthy of supporting:

Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 09:32:15 pm »

Ron Paul Did Not Vote for MLK Day

    * 
    * By: Ta-Nehisi Coates | Posted: January 8, 2012




Ron Paul Did Not Vote for MLK Day
GOP debate (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In a blog entry at Atlantic magazine, Ta-Nehisi Coates examines GOP presidential contender Ron Paul's House voting record and determines that he did not cast a vote in favor of MLK Day. Coates conducted the research after a rumor erupted on Twitter during the GOP debates in New Hampshire on Saturday that Paul voted in favor of the legislation.

... But first here's Ron Paul on Martin Luther King Day in his newsletters:

"Boy, it sure burns me to have a national holiday for Martin Luther King. I voted against this outrage time and time again as a Congressman. What an infamy that Ronald Reagan approved it! We can thank him for our annual Hate Whitey Day."

... Paul's supporters link to his Yea vote on this 1979 bill as evidence that he supported an MLK Holiday:

"TO AMEND H.R. 5461, MARTIN LUTHER KING HOLIDAY, BY DESIGNATING THE THIRD MONDAY IN JANUARY RATHER THAN JANUARY 15 AS THE LEGAL HOLIDAY."

But this actually isn't the bill for the holiday. The text doesn't even claim that. More importantly, the date is wrong. This vote was taken on December 5, 1979. The vote for the King holiday was actually taken on November 13, 1979:

The bill was called up in the House on Tuesday, November 13, 1979 ... When the final vote was taken, 252 Members voted for the bill and 133 against -- five votes short of the two-thirds needed for passage.

I'm sorry to report that one of those Nay votes, as you can see here, was cast by one Ronald Paul. I'm sorry to further report that Paul again voted no on the 1983 bill that passed.

Read Ta-Nehisi Coates' entire blog entry at the Atlantic.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.   


http://www.theroot.com/buzz/ron-paul-did-not-vote-mlk-day?wpisrc=root_more_news
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 09:56:25 pm »

Top 5 Most Racist Ron Paul Quotes

  

Getty Images
Getty Images
Did the Libertarian presidential candidate make a series of anti-black comments?

Did he or didn’t he?

That’s the question the public is asking about Ron Paul after a series of racist newsletters bearing his name have sparked controversy. The newsletters were published in the 1980s and ’90s and include disparaging remarks about African Americans. While Paul now says he didn’t personally write the newsletters, a Huffington Post investigation suggests that in 1996 the Texas congressman didn’t deny making the comments.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/26/ron-paul-newsletters-swiftness-of-black-men_n_1169990.html

Old videos from that year, when Paul launched his first presidential campaign, reportedly show the libertarian plugging the newsletters. The only complaint he shares in the recordings are that his words have been taken out of context.

So what racially insensitive remarks has Paul supposedly made about blacks and civil rights in his newsletters and elsewhere?

Here’s a list:

    The Ron Paul Political Report newsletter stated the public should bear arms to protect themselves against carjackings by “urban youth who play whites like pianos.” Note that the terms “black” or “African American” aren’t used in this newsletter sample. However, the racially coded term “urban” and reference to “whites” makes it easy for the reader to ascertain what skin color the youth in question have. The newsletter, written in the first-person, continued on this topic with the following assertion: “I’ve urged everyone in my family to know how to use a gun in self-defense. For the animals are coming.” Now these animal wouldn’t be blacks, would they?

    In another newsletter, Paul described most black men in Washington, D.C., as “semi-criminal or entirely criminal.”

    Talking Points Memo reported that in December 1990, Paul suggested that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. sexually molested girls and boys, remarking: “And we are supposed to honor this ‘Christian minister’ and lying socialist with a holiday that puts him on par with George Washington?”

    In a 1993 Ron Paul Survival Report newsletter, alarm was raised about “The Disappearing White Majority.” The newsletter referenced the growing birth rate of people of color and expressed a pro-segregation stance with this comment: “It is human nature that like attracts likes. But whites are not allowed to express this same human impulse. Except in a de facto sense, there can be no white schools, white clubs, or white neighborhoods. The political system demands white integration, while allowing black segregation.”

    In May 2011, Paul told MSNBC that he would have voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended Jim Crow. He questioned the act because it took authority away from property owners. Evidently, Paul values the rights of racist property owners over those of African Americans whose housing, employment, schooling and leisure activities were all dictated by Jim Crow.

http://loop21.com/top-5-racist-ron-paul-quotes-newsletter
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2012, 10:15:16 pm »

New Batch Of Ron Paul Newsletters Just As Racist As The First
Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX)
share
Benjy Sarlin January 17, 2012, 11:03 AM


A brand new batch of Ron Paul newsletters raises questions for the libertarian Republican — as well as a host of embarrassing fresh passages to go along with such classics as “the coming race war” and “the federal-homosexual cover up on AIDS” from earlier reports.

Ron Paul claims “probably ten sentences out of 10,000 pages” were objectionable in his long-published newsletter series, even as he denies having ever written the content in question (or even having seen most of it). But, as TPM has reported and a new collection of Ron Paul newsletters posted by The New Republic confirms, racism, homophobia, and fringe conspiracy theories seem more like the newsletters’ raison d’etre than a rare aberration. In fact, even short promotional letters for the publication name-checked many of the most toxic passages.

Once again, contempt for African Americans and warnings of a[size=210pt] “race war”[/size] are central themes in the most recently released materials. One issue warned “every honest American should be armed” to prepare for the coming violence.

“Today, gangs of young blacks bust into a bank lobby firing rounds at the ceiling,”
one issue read, continuing: “We don’t think a child of 13 should be held as responsible as a man of 23. That’s true for most people, but black males age 13 who have been raised on the streets and who have joined criminal gangs are as big, strong, tough, scary and culpable as any adult, and should be treated as such.”

Another issue from 1993 defended Marge Schott, who used to own the Cincinnati Reds, after she notoriously referred to her players as “million-dollar niggers.”

“Remember the thought crimes from the novels of Orwell and Huxley?” the article reads. “It’s not fiction in America if the case of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott is any evidence.”

In one 1988 issue, the newsletters suggest Israeli involvement in a terrorist attack in Berlin, foreshadowing a similar suggestion in a previously released issue that Israel may have been behind the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Gays and especially AIDS victims were frequent targets, with a boatload of junk science cited to back up its hateful claims. Newsletters claimed the federal government was lying about how AIDS was transmitted and suggested it could be passed on through sneezes, breathing, or even contact with mail or delivery packages. [size=210pt]An advertised book purported to tell the “the true and horrifying story of the witch-lesbo-feminists who are running America.”[/size]

Then there are the usual conspiracy theories: FEMA camps set up to intern Americans, suspicion that Bill and Hillary Clinton murdered their friend Vince Foster, secret societies running the world, etc.

TPM reached out to a Paul spokesman as to whether the candidate stands by his assertion that only eight to ten statements in the newsletters were offensive within a large body of work but did not receive an immediate reply.

http://2012.talkingpointsmemo.com/2012/01/new-batch-of-ron-paul-newsletters-just-as-racist-as-the-first.php?ref=fpb
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2012, 10:19:34 pm »

 
'Racist newsletter' timeline: What Ron Paul has said


Ron Paul has had to explain racially charged statements and other controversial comments in newsletters published in his name in the 1980s and 1990s. Here's what he's said over the years.

By Mark Trumbull, Staff writer / December 29, 2011



Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas waits in a hallway before speaking at a campaign event, Thursday, Dec. 29, at the Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa.

Charles Dharapak/AP
Enlarge
291 and 1 E-mail Reddit StumbleUpon

It's the biggest setback to hit Ron Paul's candidacy for president: publicity about racially charged statements and other controversial comments in newsletters published in Mr. Paul's name in the 1980s and 1990s.

On Thursday he responded at some length to the concerns during an Iowa radio interview, calling the newsletter statements "terrible" but insisting that he wasn't the one who wrote them. He added that the offensive comments totaled about "about eight or 10 sentences."

Some journalists who have researched the newsletters say it was a lot more than 10 sentences, and that the Texas congressman's response on the issue has changed over the years.


Here, in timeline format, are some prominent Paul statements tied to the issue drawn from transcripts, video clips, and news reports.

1985 to 1994

 The controversial statements that have surfaced stem largely from this period. They were contained in newsletters with titles like Ron Paul’s Freedom Report, the Ron Paul Political Report, the Ron Paul Survival Report, and the Ron Paul Investment Letter, rarely under a byline (although many contained first-person references that readers would assume referred to Paul himself).

Some samples: A December 1989 newsletter quoted by James Kirchick in the New Republic predicted "Racial Violence Will Fill Our Cities" because "mostly black welfare recipients will feel justified in stealing from mostly white 'haves.' "

Another letter said "I think we can assume that 95 percent of the black men in that city [Washington] are semi-criminal or entirely criminal."

An August 1992 edition of the Ron Paul Report labeled former Rep. Barbara Jordan (D) of Texas "the archetypal half-educated victimologist," according to the Houston Chronicle.

1995 to 1996

In a 1995 C-Span interview, Paul talks up his newsletter and espouses some familiarity with its contents. He says it deals a lot "with the value of the dollar, the pros and cons of the gold standard, and of course the disadvantages of all the high taxes and spending our government seems to continue to do."

Paul, having been out of office for a decade, ran for Congress in 1996 and the content of the newsletters were raised by his opponent as a campaign issue. Paul's campaign doesn't deny authorship of the newsletters, but says the Democratic rival is taking the message out of context.

In a Dallas Morning News interview, Paul said the comment about black men in the District of Columbia arose from his study of a report by the National Center on Incarceration and Alternatives, a criminal justice think tank in Virginia.

2001

In a story published by Texas Monthly, Paul tells the magazine that he didn't write "those words." The magazine itself says the newsletter statements are not "remotely like" Paul's public utterances.

"I could never say this in the campaign, but those words weren't really written by me," Paul said, according to Texas Monthly. "It wasn't my language at all. Other people help me with my newsletter as I travel around. I think the one on Barbara Jordan was the saddest thing, because Barbara and I served together and actually she was a delightful lady."

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Elections/President/2011/1229/Racist-newsletter-timeline-What-Ron-Paul-has-said
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2012, 10:25:17 pm »

He said he had "some moral responsibility" for the words, and that his campaign aides said it would be "too confusing" to argue during the campaign that the words were not his. Paul quoted his aides saying "It appeared in your letter and your name was on that letter and therefore you have to live with it."

2007 and 2008

Ron Paul runs for president and defends his record on race.

Separate from the newsletter issue, in 2007 he fielded Republican debate questions from Tavis Smiley and Ray Suarez of PBS. In more than one instance, he frames his views as beneficial for all Americans – racial minorities in particular.

In saying he now opposes the death penalty, he says "If you're poor and you're from the inner city, you're more likely to be prosecuted and convicted." He also cited DNA evidence that has shown some convictions to have been mistaken.

Early in 2008, New Republic magazine publishes a James Kirchick story recounting incendiary passages from Paul's newsletters in detail. The article asserts that the newsletters show an "obsession with conspiracies, sympathy for the right-wing militia movement, and deeply held bigotry against blacks, Jews, and gays."

In a 2008 TV interview, he responds to a question about racism by asserting that libertarians like himself "are incapable of being a racist" because they view "everybody as an important individual" rather than identifying people in groups.

In the interview, he says he enjoys strong support from blacks, for a Republican, in part because of his stands on the Iraq war and the so-called war on drugs. "In all [military] wars minorities suffer the most … so they join me," he said. Regarding the war on drugs, he says "I am the only candidate, Republican or Democrat who would protect the minority against these vicious drug laws."

2011

Paul is running for president again, and is showing greater strength in opinion polls of potential primary voters. Mr. Kirchick (writing this time in the Weekly Standard) and others revive the newsletters as a hot topic.

The Houston Chronicle Tuesday quoted Paul campaign chairman Jesse Benton saying that the newsletters were written by a ghostwriter in Paul's name. Mr. Benton acknowledged the point made by many critics of the candidate: that Paul "should have better policed" the newsletters that went out under his name.

"Dr. Paul has assumed responsibility, apologized for his lack of oversight and disavowed the offensive material," said Benton.

On Thursday, Paul reiterated on a Des Moines radio station (WHO-AM) that he did not write the controversial passages. He portrayed the volume of offensive content as small.

"These were sentences that were put in – I think it was a total of about eight or ten sentences, and it was bad stuff," he told host Jan Mickelson. But, he added, "it wasn't a reflection of my views at all, so it got in the letter, I think it was terrible, it was tragic."

In an email to Talking Points Memo, Kirchick said it's "preposterous" to say that only a handful of newsletter sentences were offensive. "As anyone can see from the scans of the newsletters available on the [New Republic] website or posted elsewhere, the documents contain pages upon pages of bigoted statements and outright paranoia."

While claiming "some responsibility" for the content, Paul said on Iowa radio that "I was not an editor. I'm like a publisher…. There were many times when I did not edit the whole letter and other things got put in."

RECOMMENDED: Election 101 - What's the Republican primary calendar for 2012?
Related stories

    The roar of Ron Paul: Five of his unorthodox views on the economy
    Ron Paul: why racist newsletter flap could hurt him in Iowa
    What if Ron Paul wins Iowa – and New Hampshire, too?
    If Ron Paul wins in Iowa, does that make the state irrelevant?

Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2012, 10:30:02 pm »

Sam Stein
Sam Stein stein@huffingtonpost.com
Ron Paul, In 1996, 'Did Not Deny' Controversial Statement In Newsletter
Ron Paul Newsletters


First Posted: 12/26/11 11:35 AM ET Updated: 12/27/11 08:40 AM ET


NEW YORK CITY -- For the second time in as many runs for the Republican Party's presidential nomination, controversial newsletters Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) published in the 1980s and 90s are threatening his candidacy.

The newsletters have plagued him since he ran to reclaim his seat in Congress in 1996. As he vies for an upset win in the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses, they continue to shadow him today. What's changed, from then to now, is Paul's explanation.

Pressed recently about the contents of the Ron Paul Political Report, Ron Paul’s Freedom Report, the Ron Paul Survival Report and the Ron Paul Investment Letter, Paul has simply denied direct involvement.

"I didn’t write them," he told CNN, when asked about the newsletter's racist descriptions of urban society and paranoid conspiracy theories about federal government. "I disavow them. That's it."

But since Paul spoke to CNN, a number of old videos have surfaced showing him touting the newsletters that were being put out under his name.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/23/ron-paul-newsletter-interview_n_1167645.html

Paul's defenders have noted that even in those video clips, he does not claim authorship, which is true. Back when the issue first arose, however, he was willing to acknowledge that the words were his -- the only complaints he made were about context.

The Huffington Post went through archived newspaper clips from Paul's '96 congressional campaign against Lefty Morris and unearthed several new instances of Paul or his campaign pleading for a more sympathetic understanding of what he wrote.

The Dallas Morning News -- May 22, 1996.

    Dr. Paul denied suggestions that he was a racist and said he was not evoking stereotypes when he wrote the columns. He said they should be read and quoted in their entirety to avoid misrepresentation.

    Dr. Paul also took exception to the comments of Mr. Bledsoe, saying that the voters in the 14th District and the people who know him best would be the final judges of his character.

    "If someone challenges your character and takes the interpretation of the NAACP as proof of a man's character, what kind of a world do you live in?" Dr. Paul asked.

    In the interview, he did not deny he made the statement about the swiftness of black men.

    "If you try to catch someone that has stolen a purse from you, there is no chance to catch them," Dr. Paul said.


Austin American-Statesman -- May 23, 1996

    "Dr. Paul is being quoted out of context," [Paul's spokesman, Michael] Sullivan said. "It's like picking up 'War and Peace' and reading the fourth paragraph on page 481 and thinking you can understand what's going on."

    "You have to understand what he is writing. Democrats in Texas are trying to stir things up by using half quotes to impugn his character," Sullivan said. "His writings are intellectual. He assumes people will do their own research, get their own statistics, think for themselves and make informed judgments."

Austin American-Statesman -- July 25, 1996

    Morris distributed Paul's article to reporters at a Capitol news conference. It was not the first time. Morris has been scrutinizing Paul's writings and sharing his findings with reporters. In May, he released an article in which Paul described a majority of black men in Washington, D.C., as ''semi-criminal or entirely criminal.''

    Morris, a Bee Cave lawyer, once again called on Paul to release back copies of the newsletter he has published for more than a decade. Paul, a Surfside obstetrician, has refused.

    He said he has written ''thousands of items'' during the past 20 years and that releasing these materials would be impractical. Paul said releasing all those writings would be like asking Morris to ''provide documents for every lawsuit he has been involved in during his lengthy legal career.''

A request for comment from the Paul campaign was not immediately returned.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/26/ron-paul-newsletters-swiftness-of-black-men_n_1169990.html
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2012, 10:31:38 pm »

Rosa Parks was one of his heroes? Really? Then why was he the ONLY member of Congress who voted against awarding her a Congressio­nal Medal of Honor in 1999?
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2012, 10:34:19 pm »

http://www.tnr.com/sites/default/files/January1993.pdf
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2012, 10:48:49 pm »

10 Shocking Quotes From Ron Paul’s Newsletters
Ron Paul
share
Benjy Sarlin December 23, 2011, 3:13 PM



Ron Paul’s 1980 and 1990’s newsletters — and their incendiary content — are coming to the forefront of the campaign as the candidate surges to the front of the pack in Iowa.

It’s hard to overstate just how extreme these publications are, from comparing blacks to zoo animals to speculating about Israeli involvement in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. Paul denies having written or read the offensive material in question, but even a casual glance at the newsletters would have revealed their basic formula. As a recently uncovered direct mail piece advertising the newsletters demonstrates, the most out there passages were the chief selling point, not out-of-context asides.

The New Republic, which first obtained the archives during the 2008 campaign, have recently posted images of several issues of the newsletters. Here are 10 of the most shocking quotes from the publications and related materials.

1. “Order was only restored in LA when it came time for the blacks to collect their welfare checks. The ‘poor’ lined up at the Post Office to get their handouts (since there were no deliveries) — and then complained about slow service.” -Report on LA riots, June 1992

2. “I’ve been told not to talk, but these stooges don’t scare me. Threats or no threats, I’ve laid bare the coming race war in our big cities. The federal-homosexual cover-up on AIDS (my training as a physician helps me see through this one.)” -Direct mail ad promoting Paul’s newsletters, written from Paul’s perspective, 1993

3. “It is human nature that like attracts likes. But whites are not allowed to express this same human impulse. Except in a de facto sense, there can be no white schools, white clubs, or white neighborhoods. The political system demands white integration, while allowing black segregation.” -‘The Disappearing White Majority,’ January 1993

4. “I miss the closet. Homosexuals, not to speak of the rest of society, were far better off when social pressure forced them to hide their activities. They could also not be as promiscuous. Is it any wonder the AIDS epidemic started after they ‘came out of the closet,’ and started hyper-promiscuous sodomy?” -June 1990

5. “Whether [the 1993 World Trade Center bombing] was a setup by the Israeli Mossad, as a Jewish friend of mine suspects, or was truly a retaliation by the Islamic fundamentalists, matters little.” -‘The New York Bombing,’ April 1993

6. “An ex-cop I know advises that if you have to use a gun on a youth, you should leave the scene immediately, disposing of the wiped off gun as soon as possible. Such a gun cannot, of course, be registered to you, but one bought privately (through the classifieds, for example).” ‘Blast ‘Em’, October 1992

7. “The opposition will do its best to provoke some precipitous action on on our part to discredit us and our cause. Follow the orders of Captain Parker at Lexington: Stand your ground. Don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here.” -Militia’s 10-point advice to other militias, January 1995.

8. “When the New Money is imposed, every American family must have a Survival Kit of highly liquid, small-denomination silver and gold coins for hand-to-hand use. The Ron Paul Survival Kit — now an industry standard — comes in an official World War II US Army ammo holder.” -Ad for ‘The Original Famous Ron Paul Survival Kit,’ undated

9. “[Martin Luther King, Jr.], the FBI files reveal, was not only a world-class adulterer, he also seduced underage girls and boys…And we are supposed to honor this ‘Christian minister’ and lying socialist satyr with a holiday that puts him on par with George Washington?” -December 1990

10. “It turns out that the brilliant [Bobby Fischer], who has all the makings of an American hero, is very politically incorrect on Jewish questions, for which he will never be forgiven, even though he is a Jew. Thus we are not supposed to herald him as the world’s greatest chess player.” -November 1992, background on Fischer’s “politically incorrect” views (which include Holocaust denial) here.
2012 Presidential Primaries, Ron Paul


http://2012.talkingpointsmemo.com/2011/12/10-shocking-quotes-from-ron-pauls-newsletters.php
Report Spam   Logged
Booker Gant
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 94



« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2012, 11:11:51 pm »

Okay, Volitzer, now try and tell me that old man Paul isn't a racist bigot. You go right ahead.
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy