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(XI.) HISTORY - Into the Twentieth Century

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Bianca
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« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2007, 09:10:01 am »








A Biography of Alan Leo by Margaret E. Hone, from her book The Modern Text Book of Astrology, 1951.:



THE TURN OF THE CENTURY


1860-1917. William Frederick Allan (Alan Leo)

This man must be acclaimed as the father of modern astrology.


Working with his wife and a devoted group of friends, he travelled all over England, lecturing on astrology. He edited the magazine Modern Astrology and was an indefatigable worker as a professional astrologer. His major achievement was the writing of thirty books, in which he made a complete restatement of astrology. From now on, the emphasis lay on the study of the human being, events in his life being shown to be largely, though not entirely, consequent on his own character.


In 1915, he founded the Astrological Lodge of London, which still carries on the spirit of his teaching. The high principles of Alan Leo and his understanding of the ancient wisdom through theosophical teachings, gave pure astrology an ethical status and lifted it away from fortune-telling and commercialism. Through the world-wide ramifications of the Theosophical Society, his books and teachings spread to all countries.









Alan Leo's work has long been out of print, and was republished in the 1960s and 1970s in England.



 Two books recommended by your author, if you can find them are How to Judge a Nativity and Art of Synthesis.


The second book, Art of Synthesis was originally named How to Judge a Nativity, Part II. When Leo revised these books, which were also part of a series he titled the "Astrology for All" series, he added additional material and a more esoteric rendering of most of the chapters. Students were delighted and the book sold really well, having more reflections of his popular Esoteric Astrology and Theosophic ideas. This prompted Leo to revise it yet again, and this second revision resulted in a new name, as the book no longer resembled a mere continuation of the first work.
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« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2007, 09:25:53 am »







                                                     E V A N G E L I N E   A D A M S





Evangeline Smith Adams, born on 8 February 1868, was perhaps the best known American astrologer of her day. She ran a hugely successful astrological consulting business as well as writing several books about the subject (including The General Principles of Astrology as co-author) and her autobiography, The Bowl of Heaven. Because Adams's biography primarily focused on her astrological business, not much is known about her personal life.



Biography

Adams was born on 8 February 1868 at 8:30 am in Jersey City, New Jersey, to a conservative family. Her father died when she was 15 months old. Before Adams began working as an astrologer full time, she became engaged to a Mr. Lord, who was believed to be her employer. Although she claims she was initially in love with him, she lost any feelings that she had for him and subsequently broke the engagement. In 19th century Boston, breaking an engagement was tantamount to divorce, and it was seen as a grave scandal. Evangeline Adams died in 1932.



Arrests

Adams was arrested twice in New York for fortune telling, in 1911 and 1914. Although practicing astrology was not legalized at that time, Adams was acquitted and set a precedent for the non-criminality of professional astrology.
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« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2007, 09:39:48 am »








Herb Kugel says in his article, "The Stars on Trial: The Story of Evangeline Adams," in The Mountain Astrologer, Feb/Mar, 2000, p. 53:

"Evangeline Adams was one of the most important influences on the development of American astrology as we currently know it. She became famous because of a tragic hotel fire in which many people perished. Her career climaxed with a precedent-setting court case in which she demanded that astrology itself be placed on trial.

"Adams came from the same illustrious family as two American presidents, John Adams and John Quincy Adams; however, she dismayed her conservative New England relations by, "dabbling in heathenism," that is, by wanting to become an astrologer. She became a very successful astrologer and gave advice and comfort to about 100,000 people during her 40-year career.

"Her clients ranged from the poor and unknown to the powerful and famous. She taught astrology to financier John Pierpont Morgan, who once stated, 'Millionaires don't use astrology, billionaires do." Tenor Enrico Caruso never crossed the ocean during World War I without first consulting Adams to obtain the safest dates for sailing."

NOTE: To read this fascinating five-page article, with details about Adam's colorful life and her landmark trial, contact The Mountain Astrologer for this and other back issues.

To read a long summary of the Adams case with some verbatim documents, visit Carlo Ravin's tribute to Walter Coleman a pioneer in astrology and the law.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 EVANGELINE ADAMS' WRITINGS: In addition to her huge clientele, daily radio show, newspaper columns, and publishing Monthly Forecast, Adams wrote four astrology books for the layperson. Published between 1926 and 1931, they are all out of print, though you may find some at AstroAmerica. They were:

Bowl of Heaven
Astrology: Your Place in the Sun
Astrology: Your Place Among the Stars
Astrology for Everyone

 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
BIRTH AND DEATH DATA: Evangeline Adams lied about her age. She lied consistently, yet in an inconsistent way. Her lengthy AstroDatabank record, rated as DD for Dirty Data is quoted here in its entirety:

"Time given in her autobiography "Bowl of Heaven" (p.27, quotes of dad's diary.) Date given in astrological literature; Karen Christino quotes same date (1868) in "A Geneological History of Henry Adams of Braintree, MA"': same date on her death certificate: same date in the 1900 Boston census.


"Other sources suggest different years of birth. In the 1910 Boston census, she claimed to be 47; in the l920 census, 49. On her marriage certificate in 4/23, she gives age 50 (her husband also gave a wrong birth year). Her obituary in the NY Times gives age 59 at her death in l932. The NY Library catalog lists"1872?"

"Catherine V. Thompson wrote to M.A. 7/8-1933, "I notice that the Director of the Evangeline Adams Studios states that she was born in 1868. That is officially contradicted by the record in our Public Library which says that Evangeline Smith Adams was born in 1859..... I met Miss Adams in Boston in 1898 and have friends who knew her there and we cannot understand why ten years have been taken off her age. Records in our State House say that her husband, Mr. George Edwin Jordan, Jr., was born June 20, 1890 at Foxboro, MA, and his mother who lives here stated that his wife was 30 years older than himself."

Joan Lenert reported that she had a chart for Adams for 1868 but for 9:30 AM EST. Lina Accurso reported that her mom, born in 1871, was a contemporary of Adams. Adams died 11/10/1933, 4:00 AM, New York, NY.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



The biography of Adams, Foreseeing the Future:  Evangeline Adams and Astrology in America is available from www.OneReed.com and Amazon.com.

About What Evangeline Adams Knew

Once the world's most famous astrologer, Evangeline Adams single-handedly popularized astrology in the United States.  Now, for the first time, Adams' biographer, astrologer Karen Christino, uncovers all of her astrological secrets. In an easy-to-understand format, you'll discover:

. How Adams predicted World War II and the stock market crash of 1929
. How Evangeline foresaw death for Enrico Caruso and Rudolph Valentino
. How she chose presidential winners
. Evangeline's work with the magician Aleister Crowley, and for clients like Edgar Cayce, Joseph Campbell, Eugene O'Neill and Tallulah Bankhead
. Evangeline on trial, with actual court transcripts
. How Evangeline chose travel and wedding dates, and analyzed the potential for marriage in the horoscope.

Karen Christino is a consulting astrologer based in New York City. Her books include Foreseeing the Future: Evangeline Adams and Astrology in America and Star Success: An Astrological Guide to your Career.  Karen has written for Glamour, Marie Claire, Modern Bride, Seventeen, and numerous astrology journals. She is professionally certified by the National Council for Geocosmic Research, and has a B.A. from Colgate University.
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« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2007, 09:41:48 am »







                                       A Look at the Famous Astrologer Evangeline Adams





by Karen Christino

Here are some of the legends: Evangeline Adams made astrology legal in New York. She predicted the Windsor Hotel fire, the stock market crash of '29, World War II, the deaths of King Edward VII, Enrico Caruso, and even herself. Her books, now all out of print, are eagerly sought after by students, and even stolen from library shelves. Her reputation rests on her astrological expertise, but she was also known to be a palmist. Some even say she was primarily psychic or clairvoyant. But the fact remains that she was the best-known American astrologer of her day. I was fascinated by this woman, and intrigued by the events in her life. Just what was true, and why is it still discussed over half a century after her death? As I began researching Adams' life for my book about her, I would ask these questions again and again.

Evangeline Adams had an eventful life and ran a hugely profitable and successful business at a time when women commonly remained dependent upon men for their livelihood. She has left us not only several astrology books, but an autobiography as well. And there is much documentation on her life available: Adams was an active promoter of herself, giving many interviews to newspaper and magazine reporters.

Fortunately, consistent birth data for Adams has been published: February 8, 1868 at 8:30 am in Jersey City, New Jersey, making her an Aquarian with Pisces rising. Adams' horoscope is quite revealing, as it indicates an emotionally sensitive individual. I feel that Adams truly believed in her work. Her compassionate nature drew her to help others through astrological consultation and guidance. The Pisces influence is also probably responsible for the mystery, glamour and romance which surround Adams.
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2007, 09:43:20 am »








Evangeline’s autobiography, The Bowl of Heaven is laced with humor and irony, and is her life as she would have us see it. I view the book as a promotional piece for both astrology and the author. As such, it is free of bold confessions, dicey personal anecdotes, or any hint of sex. Today we are accustomed to the juicy "tell all" biography.  But Evangeline Adams was writing at a different time, and she was writing as a professional. Her readers therefore only get those facts which are either entertaining or which support Adams' role as an astrological authority. If we will have the real story of Evangeline's life, we must read between the lines.

Take, for example, the only references to her father: "My father died when I was 15 months old," and "My father, through no fault of his own, had lost most of his money just before his death." How tantalizing they are! And yet I have  been unable to find out exactly what occurred. Was there an accident or illness? Was the man swindled or did he make a bad investment? We may never know.

Ascertaining anything about Evangeline's personal romantic life was also difficult. Once more, limited details are provided by the author herself in her autobiography, but it appears obvious that her employer, Mr. Lord, was the same man to whom Evangeline was engaged. Yet there are glaring contradictions in her account. On one hand, she professes to have been in love with and engaged to the man. Then she describes herself as being "totally unresponsive" and declares "I did not love him." What really went on?
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« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2007, 09:44:27 am »








We can say that logically she contradicts herself. Setting pure logic aside, however, it is apparent that she had mixed feelings about the relationship. She is able to see, feel, and understand alternate views of the situation, especially in retrospect. A complicated emotional nature is revealed.

What is also revealed is the extremely important role which astrology played in Adams' decision-making process. I estimate that her engagement took place between about 1893 and 1896, when she then left her secretarial job behind and began practicing astrology professionally. She had been studying astrology for at least seven or eight years and already had great faith in it. I believe that Evangeline herself broke off the engagement. In late 19th century Boston, this was a real no-no, even approaching the censure of divorce (a woman couldn't even kiss a man unless they were engaged, meaning that they would soon definitely marry). This must have been a frightfully dramatic episode, but Adams characteristically sidesteps the details. She goes on, instead, to discuss how vehemently her family opposed her. Obviously, part of their anger was due to the fact that Evangeline was breaking not only intellectual, religious and philosophic taboos, but social ones as well.

Any influence Mr. Lord exerted was along conventional lines -- the traditional promise of a home and family.  Her astrology teacher, Dr. Smith, on the other hand, represented the unconventional:  astrology and an independent life. We can only imagine how torn Adams was as she fought to reconcile these opposing ambitions within herself.  What would be the element of power in her life, the love and financial support of a well-to-do husband, or having control of her own destiny through an independent career? The objective nature of astrology finally tipped the scales.

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« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2007, 09:47:04 am »







If we return to The Bowl, Evangeline tells us that, "I had but one ambition: to legalize astrology in the State of New York". She goes on to give us an overview of how she was acquitted of wrong-doing.  Yet we must recognize that the laws had not changed. A precedent had been set, however, in how the law would be interpreted in the future. Just because an astrologer practiced professionally would no longer legally mean that she was guilty of wrong doing.  Evangeline implies in her book that she was successful in making astrology legal -- the reader's mind tends to fill in the rest in a certain way. The is the nature of Piscean accounting!

Today, there do continue to be those who believe that Adams was primarily psychic or clairvoyant.  Her four books on astrology convince me that this is not the case, and her predictions consistently seem to invoke the clear timing which only astrology can provide. Evangeline was highly attuned to the planet Neptune. We must assume that she had quite a strong intuition, and that she was in touch with the Infinite. If we want to understand Evangeline Adams as a true and complex person, we must be willing to admit that there was more to her life than astrology alone.

I cannot help but feel that Adams' life and memory have now been truly resurrected, as well as transformed as a result.  So many of the old legends turn out to be true, confirmation is available, even though some claims have often been exaggerated through the years.

____________________

Karen Christino is a consulting astrologer and the author of Foreseeing the Future: Evangeline Adams and Astrology in America (One Reed Publications, 2002). She's also written Star Success (Pocket Books) and articles for Marie Claire, Modern Bride and Seventeen magazines. Her popular "Choose Your Career" column has appeared in American Astrology magazine since 1992.


http://solsticepoint.com/astrologersmemorial/adams.html
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« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2007, 09:51:34 am »

                                                  



                                                                                             






                                                           G R A N T   L E W I




Writing in the 1930s-1940s, Grant Lewi was the author of two hugely popular books that introduced the general public to astrology. Still in print by Llewellyn, these gems of information and insight are Astrology for the Millions and Heaven Knows What. He received a Master's degree from Columbia University and taught English before becoming interested in astrology. For many years, he was editor of Horoscope Magazine.





Today, he is still remembered for a feat that few of us would have the nerve to try. He predicted his own death at age 49 by a cerebral hemorrhage. He died exactly on the day predicted--July 15, 1951. It is said--and it may be true--that he had never been insured, but that when he saw his death coming, he took out a life insurance policy which helped to sustain his wife and three children.

                                                               





"Grant Lewi was the inspiration for a practical astrology."

- Noel Tyl




Ask any astrologer: the books Heaven Knows What and Astrology for the Millions, written by Grant Lewi, are two of

the finest interpretive books ever written by an astrologer.
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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2007, 10:25:06 am »


                                                                                                                          GRANT LEWI'S NATAL CHART




BIRTH AND DEATH INFORMATION: AstroDatabank gives the following information rated A, from him in a letter in 1945. He was born June 8, 1902, at 8:30 AM EST, in Albany, NY, 73W45; 42N39. He died July 15, 1951, in Tucson, AZ.
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« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2007, 10:30:53 am »







                                                    S Y D N E Y   O M A R R






Astrologer to Stars Wrote World's Best-Read Horoscopes

By Louis Sahagun



Sydney Omarr, the astrologer and counselor to the rich and famous whose horoscopes are the most widely read in the world, died Thursday. He was 76.

Blinded and paralyzed from the neck down by multiple sclerosis, Omarr died at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica of complications from a heart attack. His ex-wife, assistants and several close friends were by his side.

A lifelong promoter of the ancient art of divining the future from the juxtaposition of the planets and stars, Omarr was diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis in 1971 but continued working until suffering a massive heart attack on Dec. 23.

He reached millions through his 13 books and his column, which is owned by the Tribune Co. and carried by the Los Angeles Times. The column appears in more than 200 daily newspapers.

Arrangements are being made for his assistants to continue producing the column under Omarr's name.

Omarr's books -- 1 for each of the 12 signs of the zodiac plus 1 for the entire year -- have sold 50 million copies worldwide.



Threw Lavish Dinners

Although he took his job as horoscope master to the masses seriously, Omarr also insisted on having fun. He especially enjoyed splurging on lavish dinner gatherings, for friends and paramours, and gambling. In a recent interview with The Times, Omarr mused, "I win more than I lose."

The interview was his first after more than a decade of keeping a low profile as MS devastated him physically. He believed that this year, with Jupiter in the fifth house, he was poised for success through publicity.

But, then, "Sydney always had the boyish charm of the man of the hour," said Omarr's assistant and friend, Paul Smalls. "He was always the Leo surrounded by adoring women and fans."

"About those adoring women," Omarr liked to say, "it's the astrology they're in love with, not me."

Benson Srere, who worked with Omarr at the United Press news service in the early 1950s, said Omarr was valued by his readers "not because they believe every word he wrote, but because it always contained threads of hope and encouragement."

His fans ranged from working stiffs to politicians and princes, movie stars and scholars. The walls of his Westside apartment are covered with framed photographs of him with celebrities such as actresses Angie Dickinson and Jayne Mansfield, and authors Aldous Huxley and Henry Miller.



Omarr was born Sidney Kimmelman at 10:27 a.m. on Aug. 5, 1926, in Philadelphia, with the sun, Mercury and Neptune all in Leo, and Libra on the ascendant.
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« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2007, 10:35:14 am »

                                                           






Sydney Omarr (5 August 1926 – 2 January 2003) was an astrologer and counsellor to the rich and famous. While he wrote numerous books on the subject of astrology, including “My World of Astrology” and his autobiography “Answer in the Sky”, he is probably the most widely known for his books on the popular Sun Sign astrology that endeavoured to predict a person’s astrological influences based on his 'Sun Sign' - technically derived as the constellation providing the backdrop to the Sunrise on the day of a person's birth (such as Aries, Taurus, etc).

He also wrote a daily Sun Sign horoscope column which appeared in more than 200 daily newspapers of the Los Angeles Times syndicate and which was read by millions. It is believed that Sydney Omarr has sold more books on the topic of astrology (over 40 million) than any other individual.

Omarr (born Kimmelman) was born into a modest Jewish background, being the son of a grocer and a housewife. Being a typical Leo who likes to gain centre stage, at the age of 15 he was performing sleight of hand tricks in magic shops and local talent shows.

He regarded numerology as his first love, and wrote a few books including "Thought Dial" on the topic, but he was unable to earn a living at numerology so he pursued a similar natural inclination to astrology.

At the age of 17, he enlisted in the Army and within a year he was the first and only astrologer for the Army. He wrote the horoscope column for the U.S. Army's "Stars and Stripes" newspaper, and he believed his private horoscope work for President Franklin D. Roosevelt won him that position.

When Omarr completed his stint in the Army, he attended Mexico City College and studied journalism, later to become a reporter for the United Press.

Omarr’s first book was entitled “Sydney Omarr’s Private Course on Numerology”, which he self-published and sold for £2.00. The fact that people were actually prepared to read and even buy his written words no doubt was a boost to his very Leonine ego, and this success prompted him to carry on with his literary endeavours.

As Omarr became a rather prolific writer, he also reinvented himself as a celebrity in his own right, appearing on various radio and television shows to include Mike Douglas, Merv Griffin, and Johnny Carson. He knew countless celebrities, and his wife Jeraldine Saunders was a former model, cruise director, and the creator of the "Love Boat" concept for ABC television.

Toward the end of his life, Omarr wrote a series of astrological guides published by Penguin, Sydney Omarr's Day-By-Day Astrological Guide. While he authored the books up until his death, his protégés have taken over the work, and Signet continues to publish the series.

He believed he had been an astrologer in many previous lifetimes, and he was able to do full planetary horoscopes in his head when given an individual's birth coordinates and birth time. For his Los Angeles Times syndicate columns, he wrote each and every daily horoscope column personally, usually three weeks in advance.

Perhaps the only thing that has really blighted Omarr’s life was his health. In 1971 he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and as the disease slowly eroded his body he lost his sight in the early 1990’s and became paralysed from the neck down.

                                                   

Sydney Omarr died on 2 January 2003 at St John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California of a heart attack. His wife and friends were at his side. He is buried at Riverside National Cemetery in Riverside, Calif.
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« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2007, 10:40:44 am »








"I refer to it as the world's worst-kept secret that President Reagan relies on astrology." Astrologer Sydney Omarr 1988

 

As the world remembers the passing of Sydney Omarr, a prominent astrologer whose column appeared in more than 300 newspapers across the country including the Washington Post, it is interesting to look back to the days of the Reagan Administration, and the use by the President and First Lady of astrology to guide in the making of important decisions in the White House.

The 1988 astrological revelation caused a massive stir in the press, and hundreds of political cartoons were drawn mocking the Reagans. The Reagan Library in Simi Valley California, in fact has 2800 pages of files that detail the media attack. It was during this fire storm of controversy that Sydney Omarr took to the air giving a number of interviews in the Reagans defense. He praised Nancy Reagan for consulting an astrologer before making major decisions, and he stated that "only the ignorant" would laugh at the First Lady's awareness of astrology.

In one interview, done with the Wall Street Journal, Omarr made a stunning revelation. He stated that the Reagans were not the only high level Washingtonians to have looked to the stars.

Omarr told the Journal that both President Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger were also "gung-ho" on astrology. " I don't want to reveal my sources at this time," he added. "My background is in journalism. It is unimpeachable. I know this for a fact."

As for Ronald Reagan,  like Calvin Coolidge, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt before him, astrology appeared to be tied into life itself, and important decisions required at least a quick glance to the stars. The Philadelphia Inquirer, for example, insisted that "the signing of the U.S. Soviet treaty eliminating medium-range nuclear missiles" had been signed at 1:30 p.m. on December 8, 1987 based on advise from an astrologer. In addition, many papers reported the story that Ronald Reagan had postponed his inauguration 9 minutes as governor of California till 12:10 a.m. on January 2, 1967 based on astrology calculations.
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« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2007, 10:44:54 am »








Reagan became noted as being one of the few governors to actually sign astrology legislation when on August 30, 1974, as Governor of California, he signed legislation which became Chapter 583, and added Section 50027 to the government Code, relating to astrology. The legislation removed Sacramento licensed astrologers from the category of fortune tellers, thus allowing them to practice their trade for compensation.

According to Reagan's former Chief of Staff Donald Regan, the prime source of astrological direction inside the Reagan White House was being provided by San Francisco star gazer Joan Quigley. In his book "For the Record" Regan stated that Nancy Reagan planned almost all presidential travel, press conferences, and even the president's cancer surgery based on information she was receiving from Quigley.

Regan made his stunning revelation concerning the use of astrology after being forced out of the White House by Nancy Reagan. It was a revelation that upset many inside and outside the White House including another prominent astrologer Jean Dixon.

Dixon, an astrologer who became nationally prominent for her prediction of the assassination of President John Kennedy, was once an astrological advisor to Reagan.

Dixon had gained the favor of the future president by predicting in 1962 that he would become Governor of California, and later President of the United States. "She was always gung ho for me to be President," said Reagan.

She was dropped by Nancy in 1976, when she stated that Reagan would not gain the presidency that year. Nancy figured that Dixon had lost her powers of prediction. Joan Quigley was quickly picked up by Nancy as the next seer, even though she too predicted that 1976 would not be the year for Reagan.

In 1988, when the astrology scandal broke at the White House, Dixon sent Reagan a copy of an New York Times editorial she had just written supporting the use of astrology. "I would shoot a few people if I were you for talking," she wrote in an attacked handwritten note to the President.
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« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2007, 10:47:25 am »






The astrology news was announced, mysteriously and coincidentally, on almost the same day as the death of Carroll Righter. Righter, a prominent Hollywood astrologer, was rumored to have been President Reagan's favorite astrologer during a long 45 year relationship. Reagan even admitted in his 1965 autobiography "Where's the Rest of Me" that he and Righter were friends, and that he and Nancy read Righter's column "regularly."

Other astrologers rumored to be connected to the Reagan White House included Joyce Jillson, who told the Associated Press that the Reagans regularly consulted astrologers, and that it was this counsel that led to Reagan doing things like having news conferences during the full moon. Jillson stated that "she had been to the White House" and "spent a lot of time there after the assassination attempt on Reagan."

Most importantly, Jillson claimed she had originally been employed by Reagan insiders, and paid $1200, to help pick Reagan's Vice President from a list of seven candidates. The Jillson claim actually backed up the same Bush-astrology allegation that had been made five years earlier by Democratic Rep. Larry McDonald. On April 30, 1983 McDonald speaking to the John Birch Society stated,

Mr. Reagan and his wife are both very avid followers and believers. And guess what these seers of the horoscope had to say? That Mr. Reagan would be the nominee and that the Republicans could win the White House only if George Bush was his running mate.
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« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2007, 10:49:55 am »








"One of my jobs," wrote Jillson, "was to review the charts of all Vice Presidential candidates. I told Reagan that George Bush was the only choice. The rest is history." The basic astrological sign involved in the decision was that "George Bush, a Gemini, was the most compatible with Reagan, an Aquarian."

In his first reply to reporter questions about the Reagan's use of astrology, and the story that he might actually have been picked as Vice President by an astrologer, Bush actually defended the practice. "I don't know about that," he said. "But I will tell you one thing: There are two edges to this sword. There are a helluva lot of people across this country that read these columns. Otherwise they would not be in the papers." Later after many more astrology questions, Bush then running for President himself, reconsidered his position declaring that he never read an astrology column and wouldn't know where to find one in a newspaper.

Astrology was only a part of Reagan's interest in things unseen. He was openly known to be very interested in anything occult including UFOs, lucky numbers, astrology, lucky coins, and ghosts. Even small things bothered Reagan such as a house that Reagan friends purchased for the Reagans at 666 St. Cloud in Bel Air, California. When Reagan found out the address, paperwork was immediately started to change the address to 668 St. Cloud. He was, according to Reagan's Deputy Chief of Staff Michael Deaver, "incurably superstitious. If he emptied his pants pockets you would always find about five good lucky charms that people had sent him."

To protect the administration from potentially damaging leaks about the Reagan obsession with the occult, a team of officials worked together to cover up things up. Deaver, always the loyal Reagan team player, was the official who took the bizarre timing requests made by astrologer Quigley, and made changes in the Reagan schedule while keeping secret the source of the information.
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Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
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