Atlantis Online
November 14, 2019, 03:45:02 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Were seafarers living here 16,000 years ago?
http://www.canada.com/victoriatimescolonist/news/story.html?id=34805893-6a53-46f5-a864-a96d53991051&k=39922
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

(IX.) HISTORY - Success - And The Beginning Of Failure

Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: (IX.) HISTORY - Success - And The Beginning Of Failure  (Read 510 times)
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« on: August 17, 2007, 08:13:03 pm »








No one at Bologna would have thought of wasting time arguing for the intellectual respectability of astrology.

This was now taken for granted, and at most there was an occasional sarcastic thrust at 'those who persuade themselves that a most noble body such as the sky effects nothing in these inferiors but produced merely light, and through light, heat.' Elsewhere there was a similar attitude.

At the University of Paris astrology was so thoroughly embedded in the curriculum that in 1512 Gaurico was seriously thinking of leaving Italy and going to Paris to work, on the grounds that the university there was more thoroughly committed to it.

Indeed there was a lengthy tradition, and in 1437 the university had decreed that all physicians and surgeons must possess a copy of the current almanac for use as a medical textbook. Jean Avis produced annual almanacs for the medical faculty for forty years.

Yet historians have claimed that the theological faculty at Paris was opposed to the teaching of astrology, which was never the case.

Many monarchs of Europe competed for the services of Regiomontanus (1436-76), an immensely distinguished astronomer and astrologer, and in France Nostradamus (1503-66), whose fame rested and still rests on gnomic pronouncements of future doom couched in symbols so obscure that any interpretation can be placed on them, led a group of astrologers which much influenced Henry II's widow, Catherine de' Medici.

Henry IV ensured that an astrologer was present at the birth of his son, the future Louis XIII, who in turn ordered Jean Baptiste Morin (1583-1656) to attend at the birth of his son, the future Louis XIV. Later, Morin hid behind the curtains of the royal bedroom to observe the precise moment at which the young Louis XIV and his bride consummated their marriage, so that he could work out the conception horoscope of any future Dauphin who might be born as a result of the coupling.
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.


Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy