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(VI.) HISTORY - The Coming of Christianity

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Bianca
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« on: August 17, 2007, 06:48:25 pm »





The argument between Origen, an orthodox Christian who lived between 185 and 253, and the philosopher Celsus, who in 176-80 produced The True Word, an anti-Christian tract, inevitably involved astrology. Celsus took the view that the main idiocy of many practised by Christians was the denial of the power of the planets; Origen asserted that the whole idea of free will was demolished if one accepted that the stars were rational beings, and assigned by God to the nations on earth. He accepted that the planets' movements could foretell events, and was particularly attached to the idea of comets as omens, which had announced wars and natural disasters, but also the birth of Christ.

Tertullian, born in about 160, and an eloquent early writer about Christianity, argued that it was the fallen angels who had taught man astrology (and, incidentally, metallurgy and botany). These angels, who lived in the clouds conveniently near the stars, were inevitably excellent meteorologists. Nevertheless, Christians would do well to reject them and their notions, despite the fact that the Magi were astrologers. He obviously saw it as extremely worrying that 'astrology nowadays, for-sooth, treats of Christ; is the science of the stars of Christ, not of Saturn and Mars', and argues that since the coming of Christ the drawing up of horoscopes should be discontinued. He was especially pleased that at the time of writing astrologers were positively forbidden to enter Rome.

Many Christian apologists made it their business to read the published works of astrologers, in order to refute them; others took the short cut of simply reading anti-astrological works and repeating their arguments.

Hippolytus, for instance, who lived in Italy and wrote in Greek (he was buried in Rome in 236) lifted his arguments straight from the writings of Sextus Empiricus.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2007, 08:04:13 pm by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.


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