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NUCLEAR MISSILE SILO

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Author Topic: NUCLEAR MISSILE SILO  (Read 923 times)
Annunaki
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« on: March 27, 2011, 06:03:05 pm »

NUCLEAR MISSILE SILO
This guy lives in an abandoned nuclear missile silo in Texas.




Bruce Townsley in the corrugated steel quonset hut that is one of the few above-ground structures on the site.


Head south of Abilene, Texas, cross a couple of intersections, look for a small lump in the road with mailboxes sprouting out of the ground, and you’re there. At the end of the driveway, an American flag and array of solar panels provide the only evidence of habitation.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 06:04:56 pm »



Bruce Townsley built his house in an abandoned Atlas F missile site. During the Cold War (a.k.a. "The Good Old Days" - S.L.) Atlas missiles were stored vertically in their underground silos, with attached living quarters for the missilieers. More than 30 years after it was deactivated, Townsley bought the property in 1997 for $99,000; a 2,200 sq ft. fixer-upper.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 06:05:35 pm »



A missile heads down the ICBM highway in central Texas on it’s way to a silo. During the early 1960s it wasn’t uncommon for motorists to pass these weapons of mass destruction on America’s interstate highways.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2011, 06:06:36 pm »



Construction of an Atlas missile silo. Circa 1960.


Two giant overhead silo doors cover the 185-foot hole in the ground where a missile armed with a nuclear warhead used to be. Townsley managed to get one of these massive doors up and running; with a lot of helping hands and a rented crane, he finally cracked it open.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2011, 06:07:45 pm »



Living in a missile silo means lots and lots of stairs:
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Annunaki
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« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2011, 06:08:13 pm »



Townsley takes the stairwell down to the first level of his house; the old crew quarters.

A set of 6,000-pound blast doors keep occupants safe during a nuclear attack. The doors curve inward to offset the vacuum effect of a blast – keeping everything inside from being sucked out:
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Annunaki
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2011, 06:08:41 pm »



The white “latticed” debris door is an added safety feature to keep whatever an explosion carries into the tunnels from making it to the control room.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2011, 06:09:03 pm »



All four of the doors are still fully functional – impressive in their size and precision, they take little more than a gentle shove to swing open.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2011, 06:09:30 pm »



Townsley’s living space is about 1,100 square feet and completely round. The room is essentially a concrete bubble suspended from the large column in its center.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2011, 06:09:52 pm »



When the site was an active missile base, this room “floated” on massive springs. This let the room move both up and down and side to side, which would absorb a bomb blast in the event that the Russians managed to get a shot off.

Every room in the structure revolves around the center pillar like a clock — kitchen, living room, office, bedroom — all separated by short partition walls built by Townsley.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2011, 06:10:20 pm »



Townsley has a clean aesthetic. His tastes in furnishings have a simple, feng-shui vibe.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2011, 06:11:01 pm »



Clutter disturbs the chi when you live in a round, totally open room.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2011, 06:11:34 pm »



“The hardest part was learning how to drywall on a curve.” It took some time adjusting to the subterranean lifestyle; “You have to get used to living without windows,” he says. “But I have a TV monitor [hooked up to] an aboveground video camera.” Another thing he didn’t expect was quietness. “It’s intensely quiet,” he says, “and I’m a quiet freak. But there was a time when I had to keep a fan on all day just to have some noise.”

Townsley’s James Bondian home includes a much, much larger feature – the 185 foot-deep missile silo.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2011, 06:11:58 pm »



To get to the silo requires navigating another set of blast doors and a corrugated steel tunnel.
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Annunaki
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« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2011, 06:12:19 pm »



When the silo was operational, this tunnel led to a fully fueled, nuclear warhead equipped Atlas F missile:
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