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ISLAMIC Astrology And Astronomy

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Bianca
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« Reply #30 on: August 19, 2007, 07:59:24 am »








Although Sturm was indicating a willingness to delve into Arabian and Mediaeval lunar astrology, as well as his own unquiet spirit’s ideas, Yeats seems to have taken little interest.

There are other possible places in which the Yeatses could have found lists of the Mansions, though without any tangible evidence that they did: either Western compilations of Arabic source material, similar to the Epitome, such as Guido Bonatti’s Liber introductorius ad iudicia stellarum, or actual translations of original Arabic works, some, such as that of Abenragel cited above, available in printed form, and others, such as the pseudo-Hermes, only in manuscript. All these writers, though, give very similar lists, most in fact derived ultimately from Dorotheos of Sidon and Indian sources.

There is, however, one final source that they did use, which is significantly different from the others. It is a list of Mansions of the Moon in George Yeats’s hand, and was filed with the Automatic Script from 27 June 1918; it is published in George Mills Harper’s The Making of Yeats’s "A Vision" (Appendix C; Vol. 2, 419). As the heading ‘560. Athanasius Kircher’ indicates, the list was derived from a work of the Jesuit polymath Athanasius Kircher, in fact Lingua Aegyptiaca Restituta (Rome, 1643). Kircher was among the first Europeans to study the Coptic language, surmising that Coptic was the descendent of the language of Ancient Egypt, although Coptic had already almost died out as a spoken language by his day and become restricted to the liturgy of the Coptic Church. Kircher had access to a bilingual Arabic-Coptic word list, which had been prepared in the fourteenth century by Barakat ibn Kabar (d. 1324), the priest of the Hanging Church in Cairo. This work was called The Great Ladder (Scala Magna in Kircher’s Latin or al-Sullam al-Kabêr in Arabic) and Kircher added a Latin translation, making it a trilingual lexicon. He published it under the title Lingua Aegyptiaca Restituta, ‘The Egyptian Language Restored’, since he was among the first to surmise that Coptic descended from the language of Pharaonic Egypt.

As a supplement to the word lists, he examined areas by topic, among them ‘The Egyptian names for the stars’ where he sought to piece together the astronomy/astrology of Ancient Egypt. A good part of this chapter is centred on the Mansions of the Moon and was repeated, with a few embellishments, in his magnum opus on Egypt, Oedipus Aegyptiacus (Rome, 1652-54). The two lists both have inaccuracies in the starting and finishing degrees of the Mansions, but they are distinct, and the anomalies in George Yeats’s list indicate that her source was Lingua Aegyptiaca Restituta, where the list starts on page 560.
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« Reply #31 on: August 19, 2007, 08:00:37 am »

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« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2007, 08:06:33 am »








I have amended the list slightly from Harper’s reading in the case of Mansion 4, ‘also the Hour of the [indecipherable word] with her sons’, since it is clearly a translation of ‘gallina caeli’. The use of a capital ‘H’ indicates that George Yeats probably read ‘Hori’ correctly as ‘of Horus’, although the capitalisation is generally not reliable. There is a full article about George Yeats’s list and the links with Athanasius Kircher in the Yeats Annual 16, 2005. Unfortunately in the transmission to printing, the special characters lost their formatting and the version above is more correct.


George understood Latin, but appears to have been slightly cavalier with the dictionary, taking cubitus as bed rather than the cubit measure or forearm and reading frons as frons, frondis, a frond, bough or leafy branch, rather than frons, frontis, forehead, front or brow. In both places the context makes the alternatives clear, so it indicates that she may have been rushing to some degree. She would have been able to read the Coptic as well, since the Golden Dawn required its members to know the names of Egyptian deities in their Coptic forms (Kircher’s assumption about Coptic had been proved right, and Coptic Egyptian is more or less the ancient Egyptian language in the Greek alphabet, giving it vowels and making it more readily accessible). George would probably have recognised most of the Hebrew as well, since the language and alephbet were fundamental from studies in Cabbala in the Golden Dawn. That was still not enough, though, and the gaps in George Yeats’s list are understandable when one sees the pages are also scattered with Greek, Arabic, Estranghelo and Amharic scripts.
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« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2007, 08:07:44 am »

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« Reply #34 on: August 19, 2007, 08:09:38 am »







Though Kircher was correct about the Coptic language’s relationship with Egyptian, most of his other assumptions were wrong, even if they were based on the best classical authorities. These included the assumption that the hieroglyphs were an entirely symbolic or ideogrammatic writing with no phonetic component, and that the Greek language and alphabet were derived from the Egyptian. It may seem obvious now that the alphabet is an adaptation of Greek, but Kircher saw the letters formed from the ibis, ram, bull and so on, and then taken to Greece. To us the similarities between Greek words and Coptic ones (such as ‘polis’ for city-state, ‘karthian’ for heart, or ‘stephani’ for crown) show Egyptian borrowing during the Hellenistic period, but to Kircher it seemed that the influence had gone the other way. The coincidence between the Arabic names for the Mansions and the Coptic ones is also clear and the names seem to be often Greek translations of the Arabic names, especially in the second half of the list, and so it seems probable that the list is largely a version of the Arabic lunar system, especially since the essential Egyptian system is strongly solar and decimal, using the 36 decanates of the Zodiac (ten days of the Sun’s movement) rather than the 28 Mansions (one day of the Moon’s movement). [This will be extended further.]
                                     
   The fact that the list was, at least in part, different from either the Arabic one or the European one derived from it (see Agrippa’s list below) may have been a reason for this version’s attractiveness, but the names still indicate that the Mansions are often linked to the larger constellations and are often little more than subdivisions of the Zodiac signs. Another point is worth noting: Al Batn al Hut appears here as the first Mansion, displacing Alnath/Al Sharatain, and this problem of locating the Mansions reliably may have frustrated the Yeatses: where should the Mansions start? are they tropical or sidereal? which is the first Mansion? These are all variations on the same question really.
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« Reply #35 on: August 19, 2007, 08:12:56 am »








The Shifting Mansions
The Mansions’ names often tie them to a constellation or sign of the Zodiac, for example, the ram's belly, the lion's mane, the scorpion's sting. It is also clear that with the dislocation of the constellations from their associated signs of the Zodiac, owing to the natural phenomenon of the precession of the equinoxes, if the Mansions remain tied to the stars rather than the signs, then some of the anomalies that are gradually established between the two series start to make the system look slightly absurd, thus Al Batn al Hut, "the belly of the fish", from the constellation of Pisces will now be found in the tropical sign of Aries. This is because the system of the Mansions is strongly linked to the stellar patterns in the night sky rather than to the Sun’s equinoxes and solstices (its tropoi, turning points), which form the basis for Arabian and European astrology, and the Mansions therefore creep 'forwards' as the precession of the equinoxes shifts the tropical Zodiac backwards against the background of the stars.


The exact amount of the drift varies with the date. The texts usually derive from Arabic writers of the tenth and eleventh centuries, whose works were transmitted into Europe through mediaeval translations circulated in manuscript, which, in turn, were then sometimes printed some centuries after that, with no updating. There is, therefore, room for a great deal of uncertainty, since each year adds a further slippage of 50.4", and therefore 1º every 71½ years. Such shifts can be confusing and are only further obscured by poor transliteration of Arabic, gaps, or corruption during the copying of manuscripts. Indeed, it often seems that observation stopped with the Arabs and that, once astrology fell into desuetude among in Islamic culture, the system became stuck.
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« Reply #36 on: August 19, 2007, 08:13:58 am »








Traditionally in both the Indian and Arabic systems the first Mansion was Al Thurayya (the ‘Many Little Ones’; Indian, Krittika, the ‘General of the Celestial Armies’; Greek, the Pleiades) located in the shoulder of the constellation of Taurus. With the systematisation of Greek astronomy and the establishment of the the Sun’s position at the Vernal Equinox as the First Point of Aries and the start of the Zodiac, the Mansion associated with the star Sheratan, Al Sharatain, became the first Mansion — Botein seems to have missed out. Sheratan (Beta Arietis) is one of the horns of Aries and the name, meaning the "Two Signs", refers to it as a marker for the Zodiac’s beginning along with Mesarthim (Gamma Arietis); the Mansion is also called Alnath, meaning "the one that butts" and, though this name was more common in European usage, it is liable to confusion with another butter, the bright star in upper horn of Taurus, also called Al Nath or El Nath (Beta Tauri, traditionally shared with Auriga). This Mansion, associated with the horns of Aries, is listed as the first by Abenragel (fl. 1000 CE) and Ibn ‘Arabi (1165-1240 CE), and this is the order that passed into European astrology, so that Alnath is mentioned as the first Mansion by Chaucer (1340-1400) and Agrippa (1486-1535). Johannes Hispalensis, writing in the 1140s, does not tie the Mansions to the tropical Zodiac, starting the first Mansion, Horns of Aries, at 16° 01' Aries, and places the previous Mansion, the Fish (Al Batn al Hut), at the end of the list but starting at 3° 09' Aries. However, if the boundaries of the Mansions are tied to a starting point in the tropical Zodiac, which is usually 0° Aries, when adaptations come they tend to be discrete shifts, displacing the sequence through the whole span of a Mansion, 12º 51' 26", or even two, as in the change from Al Thurayya to Al Sharatain. The list which George Yeats copied out from Athanasius Kircher places his equivalent of Al Batn al Hut (the Fish) aligned with 0° Aries, close to Johannes Hispalensis’ arrangement, but at the head list. If the system is taken as purely sidereal, then it cannot be fixed to any particular point and will shift gradually every year; if the marker stars are used, precessional slippage means that the star that is currently closest to 0° Aries is Scheat (Beta Pegasi; which will reach the exact longitude of the Spring Equinox in 2045), one of the markers of Al Fargh al Mukdin, the First Water Spout.
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« Reply #37 on: August 19, 2007, 08:15:40 am »








An example of the confusing situation, based on one of the clearer and better known stars, Alpha Tauri (Aldebaran), which gives its name to one of the Mansions, may give some indication. Aldebaran ('the follower' of the Pleiades) is usually identified with the eye of the constellation of Taurus, the Bull, and the name is one of the most distinctive and least liable to corruption since it comes from this star, which was one of the four Royal Stars of ancient Persian astronomy.

In purely sidereal terms, and therefore in both Zodiacs at the date of coincidence (circa 200 CE), it is located at 14º 35' of Taurus, at about the mid-point of the Zodiac-sign’s 30º range; by 1900 its position in the tropical system had shifted almost 24 degrees to 8º 27' of Gemini.
Abenragel and Picatrix place the start of the Mansion at 8° 34' 18" Taurus, which is a value based on the position of 0° Aries around the year 1000 CE.

Agrippa, writing in 1509 (and published in 1531), locates the Mansion, called Aldebram or Aldelamen, and glossed as the eye of the Bull or the head of the Bull, as the fourth Mansion spanning the space between 8º 34' 17" and 21º 25' 43" Taurus. This is justifiable as he is writing about what people used to do, and it appears that he is drawing to a large degree on the Picatrix.
Abenragel’s works when published in translation in the sixteenth century carry the values which were valid when he wrote, and with the name somehow garbled into Addauennam.

 
Francis Barrett used Agrippa’s De Occulta Philosophia almost three centuries later as the basis for The Magus (1801).


We therefore find positions determined for a date around 1000 being given as if they still applied after 1800.
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« Reply #38 on: August 19, 2007, 08:17:18 am »








Those who do not just follow sources create different problems:



Joannes Hispalensis, giving a list for 1142 (but published in 1548), does not fix the Mansions to the tropical Zodiac, so he has 'Caput Tauri', the head of the Bull, starting at 11º 43' Taurus and separately 'Oculus Tauri', the eye of the Bull (Al Dabaran), starting at 24º 35'.

Robert Fludd, writing in 1617, gives no names and only attributes, but places the first Mansion at 27° 53' Aries, while the 27th starts at 2° 25' Aries. It is difficult to tell which of the Mansions corresponds to Al Dabaran, but the third starts at 23° 37' Taurus.

Athanasius Kircher’s lists, written in the 1650s but with an historical approach, have the eye of the Bull as the fifth Mansion starting at 21° Taurus.

Coming to the twentieth century, Vivian Robson’s book, The Fixed Stars and Constellations in Astrology, was published in 1923; it was in the Yeatses’ Library (YL 1772) but did not appear until after the bulk of the Automatic Script and the Yeatses’ research. He takes a comparative and historical approach, giving Indian, Arabian and Chinese systems. The list of the Arabian Mansions starts with Al Thurayyah, making Al Dabaran the second Mansion, and takes the stars as markers (so that 0° Aries is not the start), has the Mansion starting at 8° 40' Taurus.

Other writers complicate matters differently, Guido Bonatti for instance adding a separate subcycle of Mansions, but discounting the Mansion in which the New Moon takes place, since the Moon’s effect is obliterated by the Sun. Arcandam (Al-Qalandar, also Alchandreus), apparently a tenth century writer whose astrological works were among the first to enter Europe, adopts a completely different methodology and dispenses with such fractional divisions, locating the Mansions squarely within the signs either in pairs or threes, putting Cocebran in the centre of Taurus (10º-20º), a solution similar to that eventually adopted by the Yeatses.
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« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2007, 08:18:30 am »








 . . back to the Yeatses




The Instructors had discouraged Yeats from wider reading in the early stages of the System’s development and had also denied that "Any use [was] made of apparent use of symbolic motion of  opposite to " (sic), asserting that the phasic divisions were "symbolic & arbitrary only" (22 January 1918; YVP 1 275). It was also clear that the Phases assigned to various people bore no relation to the phase of the moon at the time of a person’s birth, as would be the case in an astrological system. The Instructors assigned Phases to people whom the Yeatses knew early on, and in many cases Yeats knew these people’s charts well: his own Moon would be placed astrologically at Phase 18 or 19 (depending on the divisions) rather than 17, George’s at 25 or 26 not 18, while Maud Gonne, instead of being placed in Phase 16, would be born in the non-human Phase 15. In this sense at least, it was evident that the System was not astrological.

If it was not the Phase of the Sun and Moon, however, it was always possible that there was something to do with the Moon’s absolute position. Again, from their knowledge of the birthcharts of some of the people involved, it was fairly clear that it would not be any simple alignment, but they may have considered it worth investigating a little. At the very least Yeats would have been interested in another set of symbolism.

From notes and references in the Automatic Script, it is clear that the Yeatses devised an alignment of the Instructors’ Phases with the Zodiac fairly early on for their own use. In many comments, they treat the Phases as having stellar counterparts, such that fixed stars are identified as positioned at certain Phases and planets as transiting or passing through them, exactly as in conventional astrology. None of the background apparatus to this schema appears in the Script itself and evidently the Yeatses were developing the ideas elsewhere before bringing them to the evening sessions. This fixed alignment is linked to the Universal Man, and they had a different method of marrying up the individual’s horoscope and Phase (placing the Ascendant at the centre of the Phase, see Astrology).
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« Reply #40 on: August 19, 2007, 08:19:34 am »








Even if there were correspondences between the Phases of the Universal Man and the traditional Mansions, trying to connect the Mansions to their Instructors’ Phases would never have been straightforward, not least because of the difficulty of determining which Mansion started the series and where. In the published versions of the System, Yeats used the precession of the equinoxes for a rather different purpose. In the published versions, they eventually decided on symbolic rather than mathematical allocations with respect to the Great Year (which is linked to the Universal Man), and these allocations are arbitrary, fitting the divisions to whole Zodiac signs, rather than natural, dividing the circle by twenty-eight. A normative pattern of assigning mansions to signs of the Zodiac in twos and threes is seen in some Arab writers, such as Arcandam, and mediaeval manuscripts, but the Yeatses took the arbitrariness to a more extreme degree, allotting a whole sign to the crucial Phases 1, 8, 15 and 22, while allocating the others in triads (see the Cardinal Phases and Triads).

All the same, it would be very strange if the Yeatses had not consulted Joannes Hispalensis, Cornelius Agrippa, or one of the several other resources at some stage. Understandably, however, they did not pursue such researches to any significant extent, since the one thing that all the systems have in common is that they are positional divisions of the Zodiac and as such have very little to do with the Moon’s phasic changes.
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« Reply #41 on: August 19, 2007, 08:23:50 am »







                                          I M A G E S   A N D   T A L I S M A N S





                      
                             FROM FRANCIS BARRETT:
                             The Magus, or Celestial Intelligencer (1801)
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« Reply #42 on: August 19, 2007, 08:27:24 am »








The Yeatses did develop a set of images, one for each of the Phases, Symbols of the Phases, and to some extent their interest in the Mansions of the Moon may have been as much to do with the symbolism involved rather than direct correspondence. The signs of the Zodiac are very simple images, usually just an animal, whereas the Mansions tend to be associated with slightly more complex images, often of situations or specific individuals, though examples such as the fish and the head of a lion show the influence of the Zodiac.


The nature of these images seems in part to derive from the association of the Mansions with talismanic magic in the Middle Ages and early Renaissance (and still today, according to a website on Renaissance Astrology and Magic). The following Mansions and Images are given by Agrippa (for a comparison of the Images with Bruno’s for the Mansions of the Moon, see Phase Images). See Three Books of Occult Philosophy, Book II, Chapter 46 (link to another web-site for the full text of J. F.’s English translation of 1651). Agrippa tells how the talismans used to be made when the Moon was in a particular Mansion, with appropriate materials and perfumes, apparently distancing himself by claiming simply to record what was done rather than to instruct. The names are often recognisable corruptions of the Arabic ones (similar to but different from those in the translation of Abenragel above), while the Latin names coincide almost entirely with those given by Joannes Hispalensis.
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« Reply #43 on: August 19, 2007, 08:31:58 am »






 
           THE MANSIONS OF THE MOON ACCORDING TO H.C. AGRIPPA'S OCCULT PHILOSOPHY - 1533





   name (name – Latin)  from significance Talisman for with image of

1 Alnath horns of Aries  0° Aries journeys and discord the destruction of someone A black man in a garment made of hair, and girdled round, casting a small lance with his right hand
 
2 Albothaim
Albocham belly of Aries 12°51'22" Aries finding treasure and retaining captives reconciliation with a prince  A king crowned

3 Achaomazone
Athoraye rainy ones
or Pleiades 25°42'51" Aries profits sailors, huntsmen, alchemists happy fortune and every good thing  A woman well clothed, sitting in a chair, her right hand being lifted up on her head

4 Aldebram
Aldelamen eye or head

of Taurus 8°34'17" Taurus destruction and hinderances of buildings, fountains, wells and gold mines, the flight of reptiles and creates discord revenge, separation, enmity & ill will  A soldier on a horse, holding a serpent in his right hand

5 Alchataya
Albachaya ( )  21°25'40" Taurus helps safe return from journey, instruction of pupils, confirms buildings, gives health and good will the favour of kings and officers The head of a man
 
6 Alhanna
Alchaya little star of great light 4°17'09" Gemini favours hunting, besieging towns, revenge of princes, destroys harvests and fruits, hinders medicine to procure love betwixt two  two images embracing one another

7 Aldimiach
Alarzach arm of Gemini 17°08'34" Gemini brings money and friendship, profits lovers, disperses flies, destroys teaching authorities to obtain every good thing  A man well clothed, holding his hands up to heaven as it were praying and supplicating

8 Alnaza
Anatrachya misty or cloudy 0° Cancer creates, love, friendship, travellers’ fellowship, drives away mice, confirms captivity victory in war  an eagle having the face of a man

9 Achaam
Alcharph eye of Leo 12°51'22" Cancer hinders harvests and travellers, creates discord between men to cause infirmities  The image of a man wanting his privy parts, shutting his eyes with his hands

10 Algeliache
Aglebh neck or forehead of Leo 25°42'51" Cancer strengthens buildings, extends love, good will and help against enemies to facilitate child-bearing  The head of a lion

11 Azobra
Ardaf Leo’s mane 8°34'17" Leo helps journeys and money from commerce, and redeeming captives fear, reverence and worship  A man riding a lion, holding the ear thereof in his left hand, and in his right, holding forth a bracelet of gold
 
12 Alzarpha tail of Leo 21°25'40" Leo prospers harvests and plantations, betters servants, captives and allies, but hinders sailors the separation of lovers  A dragon fighting with a man

13 Alhayre dogs or winged ones of Virgo 4°17'09" Virgo favours benevolence, money, voyages, harvests, freedom of captives the agreement of married couples and for dissolving charms against copulation images of man in red wax and woman in white wax embracing
 
14 Achureth, Arimes, Azimeth, Albumech, Alcheymech Virgo’s ear of corn 17°08'34" Virgo favours marital love, healing of sick, good for journeys by sea but bad for land divorce and separation of the man from the woman  A dog biting his tail

15 Agrapha
Algarpha covered or flying covered 0° Libra good for extracting treasures, digging pits, helps divorce, discord, destruction of houses and enemies, hinders travel friendship and goodwill  A man sitting and inditing letters

16 Azubene
Ahubene horns of Scorpio 12°51'22" Libra hinders journeys and marriage, harvests and commerce, but helps redemption of captives much merchandising  A man sitting on a chair, holding a balance in his hands

17 Alchil crown of Scorpio 25°42'51" Libra improves bad fortune, helps love to last, strengthens buildings, helps sailors against thieves and robbers An ape

18 Alchas
Altoh heart of Scorpio 8°34'17" Scorpio causes discord, sedition, conspiracy against powerful, revenge from enemies, but frees captives and helps buildings against fevers and pains of the belly  A snake holding his tail above his head

19 Allatha, Achala, Hycula, Axala tail of Scorpio 21°25'40" Scorpio helps besieging and taking of cities, driving people from positions, destroys sailors and captives facilitating birth and provoking the menstrues  A woman holding her hands upon her face

20 Abnahaya the beam, transom 4°17'09" Sagittarius helps taming beasts, strengthens prisons, destroys allies’ wealth, compels a man to come to a certain place hunting  Sagittary, half a man and half an horse

21 Abeda
Albeldach the desert 17°08'34" Sagittarius favours harvests, money, buildings, travellers, causes divorce the destruction of somebody  A man with a double countenance, before and behind

22 Sadabacha, Zodeboluch, Zandeldena the shepherd  0° Capricorn incites the flight of slaves and captives, helping escape, and curing of diseases the security of [i.e. to catch] runaways  A man with wings on his feet, bearing an helmet on his head

23 Sabadola
Zobrach swallowing 12°51'22" Capricorn causes divorce, freedom of captives, healing of sick destruction and wasting  A cat having a dog’s head

24 Sadabath
Chadezoath star of fortune 25°42'51" Capricorn helps marital understanding, victory of soldiers, causes disobedience, hindering execution of authority the multiplying of herds of cattle  A woman giving suck to her son

25 Sadalabra
Sadalachia the butterfly, unfolding 8°34'17" Aquarius helps siege and revenge, divorce, prisons and buildings, speeds messengers, destroys enemies, helps spells against sex or to cause impotence the preservation of trees and harvests  A man planting

26 Alpharg
Phtagal Mocaden the first drawing, draining 21°25'40" Aquarius helps union, love of men, health of captives, destroys prisons and buildings love and favour  A woman washing and combing her hairs

27 Alcharya
Ahhalgalmoad the second drawing, draining 4°17'09" Pisces increases harvests, revenues, money, heals illnesses, weakens buildings, prolongs imprisonment, endangers sailors, and helps bringing evils against anyone to destroy fountains, pits, medicinal waters and baths  A man winged, holding in his hand an empty vessel, and perforated

28 Albotham
Alchalh the fishes, Pisces 17°08'34" Pisces increases harvests and commerce, helps the safety of travellers in dangerous places, causes marital harmony, but strengthens prisons and causes loss of treasures to gather fishes together A fish


http://www.yeatsvision.com/Mansions.html
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« Reply #44 on: September 01, 2007, 10:34:03 am »








                                              T H E   A R A B I C   P A R T S





The Arabic Parts have an honourable history in Astrology stretching far back into antiquity, yet they have been largely lost to modern astrologers since the seventeenth century. The parts (also known as "Lots") enable an examination of the "inner" meaning of the horoscope, which goes beyond the "outer" evaluations stimulated by the arrangement of the planets, signs and houses.

The doctrine of parts is based squarely on the numerical relationships between factors of the horoscope. There are a large number of these parts, the best known today perhaps being the Part of Fortune (Part of the Moon), which has survived because it is the strongest of the parts, due to its involvement of the Sun and Moon. The Part of Fortune is not a planet but is a sensitive, calculated point in the horoscope that shows in effect where the Moon would be if you were born at sunrise.

Many other parts, however, are distinctly useful in predictive astrology and are regularly used in natal, horary and mundane figures. Astrologers can use our traditional Table to Calculate the Value of the Part of Fortune for use in chart delineation.

(NOTE: parts are extracted according to the strength of the planets concerned, i.e., a nocturnal planet is stronger in a nocturnal figure than a diurnal and vice versa).

As with the modern employment of planetary midpoints, the usage of parts should be secondary to an understanding of the major chart factors (planets, signs and house cusps). Use the part to clarify or illustrate any features that need to emphasized. One reason for the decline of parts in modern times may have been their seemingly limitless proliferation and substitution for clear planetary relationships. Nevertheless, experience shows that the directions and transits to the parts (especially Pars Fortunae) have a definite effect with regard to the matters ruled by the house occupied by the part.

According to Bonatti, the significance for good or ill of the part should be judged by the conjunction, or that of its planetary lord, with the planets, but he also allows the use of other aspects (such as opposition, square etc).


To find the positions of various Arabic Parts in your chart, use this neat on-line Arabic Parts Generator.
http://www.noendpress.com/pvachier/arabicparts/index.php
To see more detail, read this article for a much longer list of Arabic Parts.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2007, 10:40:54 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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