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Treasure in Nova Scotia?

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Crystal Thielkien
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« on: January 09, 2011, 03:18:38 am »

Treasure in Nova Scotia?
By George Burden | August 25, 2010 at 12:05 am | 5 Comments




Is the Holy Grail in Nova Scotia? Possibly.

Was there a pre-Columbian Templar/Masonic presence in Nova Scotia? Probably.

Was something extremely valuable hidden in Nova Scotia? Almost certainly.

As a physician and as Chairman of the Explorers Club for Quebec and Atlantic Canada, I am open-minded but skeptical. Iíve always had a passion for history and have a good collection of ancient coins and an excellent reference library. A local dealer often asks me to identify coins that are too old to be within his expertise.

Recently, a metal detector hobbiest brought in two ancient looking bronze coins he had found by a fresh water lake near the ocean in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Imagine my surprise when these turned out to be 2500 year old Carthaginian bronze currency.

Of course, this doesnít prove the Carthaginians were in Nova Scotia. After all, a drunken pirate who picked them up in North Africa, could have passed out here and lost them two hundred years ago. Whatever era, this lake would have been a convenient spot for mariners to load up on supplies of fresh water.

A recent issue of The Explorers Journal, the official magazine of the renowned Explorers Club, featured an article on 16th century European maps which showed remarkably accurate depictions of the northern coast of Greenland. This is interesting because at the time this area was covered by ice, not only in the 16th century but even in the 10th and 11th centuries when the Vikings were journeying westward. The author maintains, however, that these areas were free of ice in ancient times when the Phoenicians (and Carthaginians who were Phoenician colonists), the ancient Greeks and the Romans ruled.

These 16th century maps referenced now-lost ancient manuscripts as their source. Since we know the Phoenicians and others traveled to Great Britain to trade for tin, itís not a stretch of the imagination to think that they may have gone further, especially during a warmer climatic period.
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2011, 03:20:29 am »

Visitors from Overseas

I mention the above only to establish how I went from scoffing at many pre-Columbian claims of visits to North America, to believing it strongly probable that we had previous overseas visitors. We just need to find evidence, and I believe there are some highly suggestive clues

At one time much of the Viking Eirik‘s and Graenlendinga Sagas was thought to be legend… until Norwegian archeologists, Helge Ingstad and his wife Anne Stine Ingstad, found proof of a Viking settlement in l’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland in 1960. As mentioned, I think it probable that others have visited North America, and that one of these was Prince Henry Sinclair, Grandmaster of Scottish Freemasonry.

The Italian geographer, Antonio Zeno, has documented how Sinclair made this voyage prior to 1400 with a flotilla of 12 ships. That this expedition ever occurred has been scoffed at by many historians, but let’s ask ourselves why Sinclair would care to fictionalize this trip. Sinclair was of Viking descent, and many of the small islands around Scotland were Norwegian territory at the time. Sinclair apparently held Norwegian titles (including Jarl of the Orkneys) and would have been well aware of the Viking expeditions to Vinland.

The Norwegians had an active colony in North America on the west coast of Greenland at least until the 1400′s, a mere stones throw from Baffin Island, and older existing maps (see cartographer Sigurdur Stefansson) show good representations of Baffin Island (Helluland), Labrador (Markland) and the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland (Vinland). The Northern Peninsula was where the l’Anse aux Meadows settlement was discovered. Sinclair would have to been aware of this. Why would he bother to fictionalize a trip that was old hat by the end of the Fourteenth Century? His Norwegian confreres would hardly have been impressed.

Furthermore, the Rosslyn Chapel, built in the early 1400′s by his descendant, William Sinclair, incorporates plant motifs including Indian maize and aloe vera. These were supposedly unknown in Europe prior to Columbus. Skeptics say the motifs are merely variations of European plants. If so the artists must have been dining on ergot contaminated bread (a medieval precursor of LSD).
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2011, 03:21:35 am »

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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2011, 03:22:22 am »

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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2011, 03:26:50 am »

The next question is why would Prince Henry Sinclair bother traveling to Nova Scotia? The only logical answer, as I will outline, would have involved something extremely valuable, specifically the treasure of the Order of the Poor Soldiers of Christ and the Temple of Solomon, otherwise known as the Knights Templar. Many people are aware of the Oak Island site on Nova Scotia’s southern shore, overgrown with imported European oaks, and suspected by locals since the late 1700′s to be a treasure repository.

This site comprises structures going hundreds of feet down to a chamber at the level of bedrock. It is so elaborately engineered that even modern treasure seekers have been unable to circumvent the system of flood tunnels and booby traps left for would-be interlopers. Some critics claim the flood tunnels are naturally occurring structures, but the layers upon layers of oak planking and packed cocoanut husks tell another story entirely. This is unlikely to be the work of a motley crew of pirates as some claim, but rather the work of trained engineers.

Coincidentally, the Freemasons of the 13th century would have numbered just such engineers, in fact the very best that medieval Europe had to offer. Freemasonry saw its origins with the humble stone cutters of the Catholic Church’s Middle Ages building mania. As the Gothic style of churches, cathedrals, and monasteries developed and became more elaborate the Freemasons slowly mastered intricate engineering skills. They organized themselves into a continent-wide network of lodges to which members could gain entry by elaborate passwords, grips and signs. This was for the very practical reason that the Freemasons often had to travel the brigand ridden highways of medieval Europe. No one, however, would bother robbing a mason because they never carried any money. All a visiting Mason’s needs were taken care of at the local lodge. The traveler in turn financed his home lodge so that brothers would stay, eat and equip themselves without expense.

In his book, Architecture, David Jacobs explains how by the early 13th century, the Freemasons had earned a level of prestige equal to that of university Ph.D. and had begun to sport scarlet cloaks, long hair and beards. In 1230 the Catholic Church ordered the flamboyant members of the brotherhood to cut their hair and dress modestly as would befit those building their churches. The Freemasons refused and threatened to strike. The Church threatened imprisonment, heresy trials and torture. The Masons replied by threatening to destroy every church, cathedral and monastery they’d built. Incredibly the mighty medieval Church backed down. Many believed the Masons could flatten a huge cathedral by simply removing a keystone or two. The Freemasons got to keep their long hair and beards.
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2011, 03:27:51 am »

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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2011, 03:28:20 am »

We now know where Sinclair got his engineers. But what was his connection with the Templar treasures? To answer this, let’s delve back a bit in the history of the Knights Templar. Although ostensibly organized to protect pilgrims to the Holy Land during the time of the Crusades, the original Templars consisted of nine French knights under the leadership Hugues de Payen (whose wife was Catherine de St. Clair, or as the family later became known, Sinclair).

These nine knights occupied the site of the ruined Temple of Solomon and began, not to guard pilgrims, but to excavate the temple. Their extensive tunnels have themselves been explored, with Templar artifacts found, proving the Order had been present. No one knows what Payen found, but not long after their excavations the Templars exploded into one of the most powerful and wealthy organizations of the Middle Ages.

By 1300, the Order was the major banker of Europe, issuing drafts which could be redeemed at any of the extensive and multi-national preceptories. They had also attracted the enmity of Philip IV (ironically known as “Philip the Fair”) despite having provided large loans and protection to the monarch. To avoid paying his debts, Philip manufactured charges or heresy and bullied Pope Clement V into ordering the Templars excommunicated as heretics. Philip tried to arrange for secret orders to be sent to have all the Templar knights arrested and their property seized on Friday, October 13th, 1307. Many of the Order were arrested but the Templars must have been forewarned as their wealth, their documents and their fleet disappeared and were (officially) heard from no more. The Order’s elderly grand master, Jacques de Molay, was tortured, and then burned alive.

This particular Friday the 13th also proved very unlucky for Philip and Pope Clement. They were both dead within a year. Many countries proved remarkably slow in pursuing the Templars and it would appear Scotland may even have welcomed many to its shores. This was hardly surprising since Robert the Bruce, the king of Scotland, had been contemporaneously excommunicated for killing his rival, Comyn, on the Franciscan church altar at Dumfries. He would have been in dire need of funds and troops as the English had long coveted Scotland’s territory. William Wallace was a predecessor of Robert the Bruce and if you saw the movie Braveheart you have some idea of how fond the Scots were of the English. The Templars had initially fought Wallace, but adversity makes for strange bedfellows.

The greatest victory of the Scots against the English, and the one which established Scotland’s independence for centuries, was the Battle of Bannockburn. On November 6, 1314, the English appeared poised to win against an apparently weaker Scottish army, when an armored force appeared over the horizon. From records of the money and equipment left behind, and relatively low casualties it would seem the English fled in terror. An armored force of knights wearing the Templar emblem would have had just such an effect, as if an army of ghosts had suddenly risen from the dead.

Having cemented the claim of Robert the Bruce to the Scottish throne, however, the Templars now presented a bit of a problem for Bruce. He remained a fair target for the rest of Catholic Europe as long as the excommunication held, as did the Knights Templar themselves. A logical move would have been to rename the latter organization or perhaps merge it with an existing one. By this time the medieval cathedral building spree had begun to wane and the Masonic lodges would likely have realized the need for new “blood”. The Templars with their wealth and power would have been an attractive acquisition as well as another way of the Freemasons thumbing their noses at the Catholic Church. Everyone, the Catholic Church included, would have been happy to see the Templars “disappear”.
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2011, 03:29:02 am »

Hence it would hardly seem strange to find Prince Henry Sinclair grandmaster of the Freemasons three-quarters of a century later. The question is what would he have been doing in Nova Scotia? Besides material treasure, some believe the Templars may have found documents which could potentially have shaken the foundations of the Catholic Church, documents which questioned some of their fundamental and long taught tenets. Perhaps what they possessed was simply too explosive to harbor in Scotland. Nova Scotia (or New Scotland) would have been a great alternative.

There are other remnants in North America thought to have connections including the circular Newport Tower (circular buildings being the typical style of a Templar preceptory), the presence of which was possibly documented as a “Norman villa” by Verrazano in 1524, and a stone inscribed with what is considered to be the figure of Templar knight. The stone is dubbed the “Westford Knight” due to its discovery in that town in Massachusetts.

Many readers may have been familiar with much of what I’ve outlined. Most are not familiar with the so called “Mystery Walls”, found near Nova Scotia’s capital, Halifax. This is a protected site, but it has not been extensively explored. It is located on high ground and is naturally fortified by ridges, supplemented with walls built in a style similar to medieval walls I’ve seen in the U.K.

The area is well back from the harbor of Halifax, and cleared of trees, would have an incredible and unique panoramic view of the harbor and its entrance, ideal for a defensive position. There is a pentagonal structural foundation within the walls which has a general eastward orientation. The building also has a smaller chamber located on the north side of the structure (which some have dubbed the Grail chamber).

The number five and the “five points” of a pentagon have specific meanings both the Freemasons as does the orientation of a building to the east, like the temple of King Solomon. In the Bible, 1 Kings tells us that the gateway to the Holy of Holies was pentagonal in shape. Furthermore, a perusal of the map of Templar structures in the Rennes-le-Chateau area reveals that the structures are orientated in a perfect pentagram.

Was this the first Masonic lodge in North America? At present, the first documented Masonic lodge meeting in North America occurred at the Sinclair Inn, in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, in 1738. Further food for thought is the fact that Nova Scotia was first known as Acadia (a corruption of Arcadie or Arcadia) in the early 1600′s. Those who believe the blood line of Christ passed through the Merovingian Kings will recall that Arcadia, Greece was the first place to which Christ’s descendants were alleged to have emigrated after leaving Judea before moving on to France.

This leaves me with one final question: What exactly was Sinclair hiding (or retrieving) in Nova Scotia? I can’t help but wonder if something of earth-shaking importance remains to be discovered on this province’s shores.

References

   1. Architecture by David Jacobs, Newsweek Books, New York 1974
   2. The Hiram Key by Christopher Knight and Robert Lomas, Arrow Books, The Random House Group Ltd., 20 Vauxhall Bridge Rd., London SW1V 2SA, England, 1997
   3. The Vinland Sagas: The Norse Discovery of America, translated by Magnus Magnusson and Hermann Palsson, Penguin Books, 27 Wright’s Lane, London W8 5TZ, England, 1965
   4. The Temple and the Lodge, by Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh, Bantam Press, 1990

Photo Credits

Photos © George Burden

“Building with pentagonal foundation found enclosed by the Mystery Walls”

“The so-called “Grail chamber” found within the confines of the pentagonal building”

“Stair case found near another building foundation within Mystery Walls”

Other Photos

L’Anse aux Meadows, recreated long house, Wikipedia Commons

Stefánsson map, c.1590, The map shows Greenland as part of the polar mainland and Hel

http://lifeasahuman.com/2010/travel-adventure/adventure/treasure-in-nova-scotia/
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2011, 03:30:09 am »

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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2011, 04:21:58 am »

The Knights Templar 

The Knights Templar have been linked to the mystery of Oak Island by many, primarily because historical records suggest that they had both motive and means to deposit treasure in the Money Pit. Compelling of all is their connection with the Holy Land, prompting speculation of untold wealth in the form of the Holy Grail.

The Knights Templar were a military and religious band of men. When they formed in 1114 AD they were a small band of nine men who protected the highways of the holy land, thus allowing pilgrims to travel safely without the worry of threat from pickpockets, thieves, pirates and massive Islamic armies.

The Knights Templar were themselves on a secret mission whilst they camped in the Temple of Solomon. Here they were swiftly excavating the ruins beneath the ancient stables and were quick to return home once they found what ever it was they had been searching for. Could the Templar have discovered the legendary Holy Grail?

Meanwhile, St. Bernard preached about Holy War, stirring up Europe for the Crusades, causing the Templar to find themselves at the centre of religious fervour. It was not long before sons of wealthy families were pledging their fortunes and property to the order just for the privilege of joining the band.

The Templar began to emerged as the worlds first bank whereby Kings would deposit their gold in Paris only to be able to withdraw it again in Jerusalem. The result of which was the immaculate growth of Templar, in both wealth and number.

When eventually Jerusalem and the Holy Lands were lost to Islamic rule, the Templar experienced a swift backlash whereby the king of France began to plot against the organisation in hope of reaching their immense wealth.

On 13th of October 1307 the King found an ally in the Pope and ordered that the Templar be arrested. Those captured played victim to the worst tortures the medieval culture could bestow upon them, followed by being burned at the stake. The Templar grand master announced a curse on the king and pope from his final position, the stake on which he was roasted. Within one year, both would be dead.

Once the day of the arrests arrived, the Paris Templar arranged that its treasures be loaded on a wagon train headed toward the port city of La Rochelle. From there, it was deposited aboard the Templar ships, setting sail to an unknown destination. According to Andrew Sinclair, author of "The Sword and the Grail", the Templar were said to flee with the treasure to Scotland.

It was in Scotland that they founded the St. Clair family, later to be known as Sinclair. The Sinclair's built Rosslyn Chapel, an often cited link between the Temple and Freemasonry. This chapel becomes temporarily the resting place of the legendary Holy Grail before its final journey to Nova Scotia, (a site currently enjoying increased fame due to the success of the popular Dan Brown novel, The Da Vinci Code).

The Sinclair's became the Grand Masters of the order and desired a new land in which to establish their utopian Templar government. Using both their money and military strength coupled with the sailing abilities of the Zeno's, they sailed westwards towards Nova Scotia.

The arrival of the Knights Templar in this region is supported by a Zeno narrative and map attributed to Vopell and Vavassatore. It depicts the landmass of Nova Scotia or New Scotland with the figure of a crowned knight. Further evidence exists of visitors in New England, in the form of the Tower in Newport, Rhode Island and, the Westford Knight, a carving of the figure of an armoured, European knight holding a cruciform sword, a common Templar emblem on graves.

With the motive to settle in Nova Scotia, one question remains, what happened to all the Templar treasure? Assuming treasure was still remaining after the building and sustaining St. Clair's and the voyage to America it would have been necessary to hide it.

Once the unsuccessful colony of the Temple died out, instead of sailing back east, the American Templar decided to hide the bounty. They built a complex 'Money Pit' on Oak Island by engineering flood traps to prevent anyone reaching the treasure. The spot is marked using the form of a stone cross, symbolism typical of the Templar.

Evidence exists to support the Templar's involvement in the Oak Island Money Pit, but to expand this theory further, it would be useful to consider the influence of the Freemasons in this area, as the Templar were a precurser for this select group of individuals. There remains a strong connection to this area with the Knights Templar, whether relative to the treasure or not and further study may shed light on the mystery.

http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk/content/view/52/73/
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2011, 04:24:35 am »

Oak Island / Knights Templar Treasure / Kensington Rune Stone

    This story of a Great Treasure buried on Oak Island is known worldwide and for over 600 years many have spent money and lives
looking for it. We saw a TV show on the History Channel about the Kensington Rune Stone, Oak Island and the Knights Templar
Treasure and we were hooked. On the TV show Scott F. Wolter did a great deal of work to prove that the Kensington Stone was real
and it was from the 1360's but others refused to believe his findings. Scott went to Oak Island and traveled to other sites to prove his
point but still others refuse to believe his findings so we thought we would take a look at his work and see what we could come up
with.

    Well within 3 weeks we think we found the missing link that could put the last piece of this puzzle together to get things going
again. We located what looks to be a ship covered with stones and is the same size and shape of a Viking Cargo ship from the 1390's.
We have tried to get a Treasure Trove Permit from the Nova Scotia Government but this is like giving up a kidney. We talked to all of
the departments and got the run a round. Mr. Robert Ogilvie manager of Special Places, Dep. of Tourism, Heritage, and Culture said
we had no qualifications or understanding of documented history. We were welcome to apply but it would be turned down. Well now I
will do what it takes to prove him wrong.

    I told them we did not want the ship and we did not want to dig it up, we only needed information from the ship and site to help us
locate the Templar Treasure and they could keep the ship. Well now this will not happen. We hope to get a Museum or someone that
wants to check out what we located and they can claim the ship. When we ask DCNR or the Museum Commissioner back here in Pa.
for something the first thing they say is NO. I see this is also true in Canada. I just wonder how many treasure hunters give up and just
dig and take their chances. The Governments and Museums are the ones that lose in this game; artifacts are being melted down and
sold.

    Finders Keepers is doing what we can to work with the governments and not against them. We are doing everything we can to get
someone to check out this site this summer.


Click Here to read the story on the Oak Island Money Pit.

Here is OUR story and what we found on our trip to Hobson Island.

       In June 2010, Finders Keepers traveled to Nova Scotia to checked out a small island in the Mahone Bay area. The Island is know
as Hobson Island and it is 175 feet long and 100 feet wide and around 5 feet above sea level during high tide and 700 feet long at low
tide. We used Google Earth to view it up close and to measure it. In the pictures you can see a pile of rocks in the shape of a ship and
the pile measures 59 feet long and a Viking Cargo ship measures 59 feet long. The Vikings were known to burry their ships when they
were no longer useful.

       In the History of the Mikmag Indians they tell of red hair men that came to their land on the back of a wale. Then they say the red
hair men built a island and planted trees on it. Then the red hair men built a ship and left.

       Well we think this was not a wale but a Viking Ship turned over. Had the wale made it to main land then the Mikmag would of
known it was a ship, so it did not make it to shore. We believe that the Mikmag saw the Vikings on the back of their ship and it looked
like a wale from 3/4 of a mile away. Then the Viking Ship hit land and the mast broke off. Then they unloaded the ship and burried it on
the Island. The island was made of sand and was 20 feet above sea leavel so it would be easy to dig a hole big enough to burry the
ship. They would of wanted to use stone to hold it down instead of sand. We think they used the stones found around the shore line
and this is why the island is gone today.

      A Viking Cargo Ship could hold up to 25 tons of cargo and they could of built a raft and used the high tide and low tide to get the
cargo and treasure to shore of Oak Island. They could of hauled stones and trees back to the island during low tide and to the Mikmag
this would look like they were building a island.

       If a Viking Ship was upside down the mast would be the first thing to hit solid land and if you look in the upper right of the picture
( use Google Earth not Google Map ) you can see a straight object that we think could be the mast and yardarm.

The Island is in the right location, between the ocean and Oak island.
The island is 3/4 mile from shore.
The pile of rocks are in the shape of a ship.
The pile of rocks are 59 feet long.
The Viking Cargo ships were 59 feet long.
The long object (mast) is on the ocean side of the island.
The long object is the right size for the mast and yardarm together.
The Vikings were the only ones to burry their ships and there is a pile of rocks.

       We believe there was a Viking Ship buried on the Island and this was the ship Prince Henry Sinclare and the Templar Treasure
was on. Now that the island has washed away you can see a pile of rocks that we believe were used to bury the ship but are now
gone. In the1970's a Light House and buildings were on the island but all are now gone and so is the 20 foot high island.
If this is a Viking Ship the ocean will destroy anything left on the island, we have to work together and fast on this historical find to get
the info before it is gone. We just want to prove this is a Viking Ship, then hope the Goverment locates someone to check it out to see
if anything is left.

1. We are still trying to get a small piece of wood from the streight object in the water to have it carbon dated. Our rented dive gear was
not working for us to get a sample. We are looking for someone in the area that has their own dive gear and is willing to help us get
the wood sample to carbon date. Email us for more info..

2. We did locate metal artifacts from the area that looks like a ship but the goverment says the artifacts are from the late 1800's and
early 1900's.Huh

3. We did hope to locate some wood or coconut fibers on the surface to carbon date but there is to many dried plants on the island to
do this in one day.

4. We had metal detectors with us but their is lots of red stones and red clay (with iron deposits) and plants that set off the detectors.
Yet we still located metal objects.

Check out these other topic related websites:

http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk

http://www.hookedx.com

http://www.chesterbound.com/Oak%20Island/Hobson%20nose.htm
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2011, 04:25:41 am »

Oak Island / Knights Templar Treasure / Kensington Rune Stone

    This story of a Great Treasure buried on Oak Island is known worldwide and for over 600 years many have spent money and lives
looking for it. We saw a TV show on the History Channel about the Kensington Rune Stone, Oak Island and the Knights Templar
Treasure and we were hooked. On the TV show Scott F. Wolter did a great deal of work to prove that the Kensington Stone was real
and it was from the 1360's but others refused to believe his findings. Scott went to Oak Island and traveled to other sites to prove his
point but still others refuse to believe his findings so we thought we would take a look at his work and see what we could come up
with.

    Well within 3 weeks we think we found the missing link that could put the last piece of this puzzle together to get things going
again. We located what looks to be a ship covered with stones and is the same size and shape of a Viking Cargo ship from the 1390's.
We have tried to get a Treasure Trove Permit from the Nova Scotia Government but this is like giving up a kidney. We talked to all of
the departments and got the run a round. Mr. Robert Ogilvie manager of Special Places, Dep. of Tourism, Heritage, and Culture said
we had no qualifications or understanding of documented history. We were welcome to apply but it would be turned down. Well now I
will do what it takes to prove him wrong.

    I told them we did not want the ship and we did not want to dig it up, we only needed information from the ship and site to help us
locate the Templar Treasure and they could keep the ship. Well now this will not happen. We hope to get a Museum or someone that
wants to check out what we located and they can claim the ship. When we ask DCNR or the Museum Commissioner back here in Pa.
for something the first thing they say is NO. I see this is also true in Canada. I just wonder how many treasure hunters give up and just
dig and take their chances. The Governments and Museums are the ones that lose in this game; artifacts are being melted down and
sold.

    Finders Keepers is doing what we can to work with the governments and not against them. We are doing everything we can to get
someone to check out this site this summer.


Click Here to read the story on the Oak Island Money Pit.

Here is OUR story and what we found on our trip to Hobson Island.

       In June 2010, Finders Keepers traveled to Nova Scotia to checked out a small island in the Mahone Bay area. The Island is know
as Hobson Island and it is 175 feet long and 100 feet wide and around 5 feet above sea level during high tide and 700 feet long at low
tide. We used Google Earth to view it up close and to measure it. In the pictures you can see a pile of rocks in the shape of a ship and
the pile measures 59 feet long and a Viking Cargo ship measures 59 feet long. The Vikings were known to burry their ships when they
were no longer useful.

       In the History of the Mikmag Indians they tell of red hair men that came to their land on the back of a wale. Then they say the red
hair men built a island and planted trees on it. Then the red hair men built a ship and left.

       Well we think this was not a wale but a Viking Ship turned over. Had the wale made it to main land then the Mikmag would of
known it was a ship, so it did not make it to shore. We believe that the Mikmag saw the Vikings on the back of their ship and it looked
like a wale from 3/4 of a mile away. Then the Viking Ship hit land and the mast broke off. Then they unloaded the ship and burried it on
the Island. The island was made of sand and was 20 feet above sea leavel so it would be easy to dig a hole big enough to burry the
ship. They would of wanted to use stone to hold it down instead of sand. We think they used the stones found around the shore line
and this is why the island is gone today.

      A Viking Cargo Ship could hold up to 25 tons of cargo and they could of built a raft and used the high tide and low tide to get the
cargo and treasure to shore of Oak Island. They could of hauled stones and trees back to the island during low tide and to the Mikmag
this would look like they were building a island.

       If a Viking Ship was upside down the mast would be the first thing to hit solid land and if you look in the upper right of the picture
( use Google Earth not Google Map ) you can see a straight object that we think could be the mast and yardarm.

The Island is in the right location, between the ocean and Oak island.
The island is 3/4 mile from shore.
The pile of rocks are in the shape of a ship.
The pile of rocks are 59 feet long.
The Viking Cargo ships were 59 feet long.
The long object (mast) is on the ocean side of the island.
The long object is the right size for the mast and yardarm together.
The Vikings were the only ones to burry their ships and there is a pile of rocks.

       We believe there was a Viking Ship buried on the Island and this was the ship Prince Henry Sinclare and the Templar Treasure
was on. Now that the island has washed away you can see a pile of rocks that we believe were used to bury the ship but are now
gone. In the1970's a Light House and buildings were on the island but all are now gone and so is the 20 foot high island.
If this is a Viking Ship the ocean will destroy anything left on the island, we have to work together and fast on this historical find to get
the info before it is gone. We just want to prove this is a Viking Ship, then hope the Goverment locates someone to check it out to see
if anything is left.

1. We are still trying to get a small piece of wood from the streight object in the water to have it carbon dated. Our rented dive gear was
not working for us to get a sample. We are looking for someone in the area that has their own dive gear and is willing to help us get
the wood sample to carbon date. Email us for more info..

2. We did locate metal artifacts from the area that looks like a ship but the goverment says the artifacts are from the late 1800's and
early 1900's.Huh

3. We did hope to locate some wood or coconut fibers on the surface to carbon date but there is to many dried plants on the island to
do this in one day.

4. We had metal detectors with us but their is lots of red stones and red clay (with iron deposits) and plants that set off the detectors.
Yet we still located metal objects.

Check out these other topic related websites:

http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk

http://www.hookedx.com

http://www.chesterbound.com/Oak%20Island/Hobson%20nose.htm
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Wildcard
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« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2015, 08:25:59 pm »



What map is this?
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captnfrog
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« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2016, 09:58:02 am »

Hello,
Is there a photo avail of the coins brought in?
Thank you
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