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Leonid Meteor Shower 2010: Everything You Need To Know


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Mobius
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« on: November 18, 2010, 12:22:01 am »


Leonid Meteor Shower 2010: Everything You Need To Know (PHOTOS)

Alden Wicker First Posted: 11-17-10 12:51 PM   |   Updated: 11-17-10 01:28 PM

Conditions are ripe tonight for a beautiful display of fireworks.

The annual Leonid meteor shower happens tonight, November 17th through the 18th. With 15 to 20 an hour, you'll be able to see a meteor streak across the sky every few minutes, though Discovery Magazine puts it at more like 20 to 30 an hour.

The best time to observe should be after midnight, when the earth is facing the incoming bits of gravel. No telescope needed, just a space far away from light pollution where you have a wide view of the sky, and maybe a lawn chair to keep you from getting a crick in your neck.

Unfortunately, the gibbous moon will be bright this year. If you're really intent on having the best view, stay up until the wee hours of the morning, when the moon sets and allows the sky to darken, around 5:15 am. The Washington Post report that the sky will be dark enough for a good show by 3 am.

The Leonid shower happens every year in November. This year's shower will be relatively tame, since Earth will be passing through a less crowded area of debris from the comet Temple-Tuttle. Previous showers showcased hundreds or thousands of meteors an hour.

Check out PHOTOS from past Leonid meteor showers below.

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Mobius
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2010, 12:23:06 am »



Leonids meteors are seen streaking through the sky in Muju county, 300 kilometers, southwest of Seoul, South Korea Monday, Nov. 19, 2001. (AP Photo/Yonhap)
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Mobius
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2010, 12:25:16 am »



Several Leonids meteors are seen streaking through the sky over Joshua Tree National Park, Calif., looking to the south in the Southern California desert in this approximately 25-minute time exposure ending at 3:45 a.m. PST (11:45 UT) Sunday, Nov. 18, 2001. Two are visable at center, one partly hidden behind a Joshua tree branch. Two more faint meteors are just above the scrub brush at lower right, and two other faint meteors appear at top and center left.. The Leonid shower occurs each November, whenthe Earth's orbit takes it through a trail of dust particles left by the Comet Tempel-Tuttle, which swings around the sun once every 33 years. The horizontal streaks are stars and or planets. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
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Mobius
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2010, 12:26:14 am »



The night sky over the ancient city of Ayutthaya, Thailand, is seen Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009 as meteors from Leonid meteor shower appear. Forecasters define a meteor storm as 1,000 or more meteors per hour expected to streak across the sky during the shower's peak. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
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Mobius
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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2010, 12:27:09 am »



The night sky over the ancient city of Ayutthaya, Thailand, is seen Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009, as meteors from Leonid meteor shower appear. Forecasters define a meteor storm as 1,000 or more meteors per hour expected to streak across the sky during the shower's peak. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
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Mobius
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2010, 12:28:01 am »



Leonid meteors are seen streaking across the sky over snow-capped Mount Fuji, Japan's highest mountain, early Monday Nov. 19, 2001, in this 7-minute exposure photo. Star gazers braved cold temperatures at the foot of Mount Fuji to observe the shower of Leonid meteors. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
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Mobius
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2010, 12:28:52 am »



A group of Lenoid meteors are observed in the sky above Beijing's Great Wall early Wednesday morning, Nov. 18, 1998. The shower is caused by the earth's passage through the long tail of the Comet Tempel-Tuttle. It is called the Leonid shower because the meteors appear to come from the direction of the constellation Leo. (AP Photo/Chien-min Chung)
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Mobius
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2010, 12:29:21 am »

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Mobius
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2010, 12:30:07 am »



BADELING PASS, CHINA: The Leonid meteor shower lights up the sky above China's Great Wall as stargazers brave the minus 20 degrees Celcius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit) temperature and walk up the wall with their flashlights 18 November in Badaling. AFP PHOTO/Stephen SHAVER (Photo credit should read STEPHEN SHAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2010, 12:31:01 am »



AYUTTAYA, THAILAND: The Queen Sri Suriyothai statue in Thailand's ancient capital Ayutthaya is silhouetted against the night sky as thousands of people turned out to watch the Leonid meteor shower in the early hours 18 November. Traffic jams were reported on major highways leading out of the capital Bangkok as Thais fled smoggy skies to catch a glimpse of the celestial display, which disappointed all with less meteors than expected. (PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mobius
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« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2010, 12:31:57 am »



AZRAK, JORDAN: Photo dated 18 November 1999 shows a Leonid meteor storm over the Azrak desert, 90km east of Amman. The storm packed up to some 1,500 meteros per hour visible with the eye. The Leonids - so called because they appear in the sky in the region of the constellation of Leo - are a stream of minute dust particles trailing behind the Tempel-Tuttle comet, which is visible from earth every 33 years. (JAMAL NASRALLAH/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mobius
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« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2010, 12:32:44 am »



AZRAK, JORDAN: Photo dated 18 November 1999 shows a Leonid meteor storm over the Azrak desert, 90km east of Amman. The storm packed up to some 1,500 meteros per hour visible with the eye. The Leonids - so called because they appear in the sky in the region of the constellation of Leo - are a stream of minute dust particles trailing behind the Tempel-Tuttle comet, which is visible from earth every 33 years. (JAMAL NASRALLAH/AFP/Getty Images)
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Mobius
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« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2010, 12:33:27 am »



A reservoir is seen under the sky in Prachinburi province, northeastern Thailand in the early hours on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009, as the Leonid meteor shower nears its peak. (AP Photo/Wasant Wanichakorn)
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« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2010, 12:34:11 am »



A woman observes the night sky for Leonid Meteors at an observatory near the village of Progled south of the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2009. The annual Leonid meteor shower is promising to put on a dazzling sky show. The Leonid meteor shower occurs each year as a result of Earth passing through dust released by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. The point from where the Leonid meteors appear to radiate is located within the constellation Leo. (AP Photo/Petar Petrov)
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« Reply #14 on: November 18, 2010, 12:34:56 am »



A Mongolian nomad family gather outside their gers, or tents, to look at the Leonid meteor shower on the snow-covered Hurandel Hills, near Zoonmod, in Mongolia early Wednesday November 18, 1998. The family did not stay out long in the minus 25 degree celcius cold, as they were treated only a few were falling than had been predicted. The Leonid meteors, the result of dust from a passing comet, were last visible 33 years ago. (AP Photo/Greg Baker)
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