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Private Enterprise- To mars

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Author Topic: Private Enterprise- To mars  (Read 7264 times)
HereForNow
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« Reply #120 on: September 06, 2007, 09:37:33 pm »

Off Topic:

Imagine nanoprobes inside of latex paint that could be electronically manipulated to actually change the pigments to any color. A touch screen is positioned in a panel on the wall of a home. It would be used as a climate control/wall & ceiling color control in one.

Britannica gives this explanation for pigments in all types of paint. -
Pigments are insoluble and are applied not as solutions but as finely ground solid particles mixed with a liquid. In general, the same pigments are employed in oil- and water-based paints, printing inks, and plastics. Pigments may be organic (i.e., contain carbon) or inorganic. …



 Smiley Hmmm
« Last Edit: September 06, 2007, 09:38:16 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

mdsungate
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« Reply #121 on: September 07, 2007, 02:43:54 pm »

 Smiley  I was watching the "Science Channel" last night, and some researchers were given a grant for promising research in the the field of future space travel. 

There are grants for this kind of thing!

HERE'S A QUOTE FROM:

http://code210.gsfc.nasa.gov/grants/grants.htm#General_Information


Quote
NASA's GSFC Grants procurement office awards and administers grants and cooperative agreements for the GSFC scientific research programs and for NASA Headquarters (HQ) Program Offices, including continuations and renewals to previously awarded HQ grants. All awards are made in accordance with the NASA Grants and Cooperative Agreement Handbook, http://ec.msfc.nasa.gov/hq/grcover.htm.

Ya never know, HereForNow.  Wink
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HereForNow
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« Reply #122 on: September 07, 2007, 03:15:14 pm »

Again you have to present a realistic plan that will get that money awarded. We could show them all of this and, not only would we be denied. They will use the idea. It has to stay in the confines of private enterprise.


NASA depends upon the private sector -- industry, educational institutions and other nonprofit organizations -- for the greater part of its research needs. Therefore, NASA encourages the submission of unique and innovative unsolicited proposals which will further the Agency's mission.
This document provides guidelines for the preparation of formal unsolicited proposals to those who wish to convey their creative methods or approaches to NASA. These guidelines apply to all unsolicited proposals regardless of the NASA Installation or Agency program for which they are intended, but do not apply to solicited proposals.

At the end of this document, information is provided which gives insight into NASA's specific current and anticipated research goals, and science or engineering topics that may be of interest to NASA. It should be noted that projects toward the research end of the spectrum rather than supplies or services are generally most suited to the unsolicited proposal approach.

« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 07:11:05 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

Qoais
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« Reply #123 on: September 08, 2007, 01:30:01 am »

I'm thinking that for one to tap into this money trough, one must have a few things first.

Like - a background in science and scientific research

Like - maybe a lab where some work is already being done and one can demonstrate one's skills in the desired technology

Like - may a few letters behind their name

and like that Cheesy
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HereForNow
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« Reply #124 on: September 08, 2007, 01:37:01 pm »

I'm thinking that for one to tap into this money trough, one must have a few things first.

Like - a background in science and scientific research

Like - maybe a lab where some work is already being done and one can demonstrate one's skills in the desired technology

Like - may a few letters behind their name

and like that Cheesy

I agree! I'm a carpenter and machinist. The only money they will give me is enough for a bus ride to the air-port. LOL
Ofcourse if I were a multi-millionaire, that would be different. Then they would be asking me to invest in them. Which is kind of what a business plan accomplishes.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2007, 01:40:59 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

mdsungate
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« Reply #125 on: September 09, 2007, 10:32:55 am »

 Smiley  Well, then maybe this idea should be presented to a promising researcher, and not to NASA?  There are some good ideas here, even if they're from a carpenter, a musician, and (okay Qoais... I'm not going to pigeon-hole you, because you are quite versitile), and the rest of the contributers in this thread. 

I myself am a would be writer, and novelist, (still trying to sell my novel).  A personal here of mine is, Jules Verne.  Although he never invented anything, his fictional stories inspired the scientists of later days.  The first step of any technological progress is in the belief that it could be done, and it would be beneficial to mankind if it were done.  If Verne hadn't planted the thought in peoples minds that a trip to the moon was possible, perhaps we never would have suceeded in going there.  His story made it seem real and possible.  And so although I am not in the position to implement anything along the lines of a space station, (and perhaps none of us here are), we are all in the position of writing about one.  Which is exactly what we have already done. 

So perhaps the next step is to put it in the form of a story.  Or at least put it in the form of a magazine article which could be published and read by scientists who could do something about implementing it. 

My voice teacher taught me this addage; "Follow through on your ideas, or you will read about them in the newspaper".   Wink

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HereForNow
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« Reply #126 on: September 09, 2007, 12:37:00 pm »

Smiley  Well, then maybe this idea should be presented to a promising researcher, and not to NASA?  There are some good ideas here, even if they're from a carpenter, a musician, and (okay Qoais... I'm not going to pigeon-hole you, because you are quite versitile), and the rest of the contributers in this thread. 

I myself am a would be writer, and novelist, (still trying to sell my novel).  A personal here of mine is, Jules Verne.  Although he never invented anything, his fictional stories inspired the scientists of later days.  The first step of any technological progress is in the belief that it could be done, and it would be beneficial to mankind if it were done.  If Verne hadn't planted the thought in peoples minds that a trip to the moon was possible, perhaps we never would have suceeded in going there.  His story made it seem real and possible.  And so although I am not in the position to implement anything along the lines of a space station, (and perhaps none of us here are), we are all in the position of writing about one.  Which is exactly what we have already done. 

So perhaps the next step is to put it in the form of a story.  Or at least put it in the form of a magazine article which could be published and read by scientists who could do something about implementing it. 

My voice teacher taught me this addage; "Follow through on your ideas, or you will read about them in the newspaper".   Wink



SunGate, I would be honored to have you write about this. I will even let you publish my real name. Hopefully the others in the thread will feel the same.

As for the science that we've published that contributes to the feisibility of actually doing it. I beleive that it would make all the sence in the world to readers to know that these things can be done already, and haven't been.  Wink
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HereForNow
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« Reply #127 on: September 09, 2007, 03:23:06 pm »

Do a search on: (electrostatic-manipulation on nano)

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HereForNow
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« Reply #128 on: September 09, 2007, 03:25:20 pm »


Please Reveiw....

Nanoscale Manipulation and Self-Assembly: Single particle nano-manipulation, DNA nanotechnology, and Bio-nanotechnology.
Nanoscale Manipulation includes techniques for the manipulation of single cells, individual molecules, and atoms by scanning probes, laser tweezers, and other novel techniques. These schemes can be viewed as "top-down" fabrication techniques taken to their extreme, where even single particles can be positioned precisely. Nanoscale Self-Assembly takes the opposite approach. Here, chemical processes, such as complementary base pairing in DNA, are exploited for "bottom-up" assembly, where the structure "self-assembles" spontaneously without external manipulation. Other forms of bio-nanotechnology include biomaterial templating and microbial nanomanufacturing. Which stands to reason that for the self-assembling structures to occur, we need to think; Electrostatic discharge or electro-chemical signals and frequency modulation.

« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 09:58:25 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #129 on: September 09, 2007, 03:48:06 pm »


Think, Quantum Computer
Hybrid Molecular Electronics Example:
In the near term, there are myriad companies who are leveraging the power of organic self-assembly (bottom up) and the market interface advantages of top down design. The top down substrate constrains the domain of self-assembly.

Based in Denver, ZettaCore builds molecular memories from energetically elegant molecules that are similar to chlorophyll. ZettaCore's synthetic organic porphyrin molecule self-assembles on exposed silicon. These molecules, called multiporphyrin nanostructures, can be oxidized and reduced (electrons removed or replaced) in a way that is stable, reproducible, and reversible. In this way, the molecules can be used as a reliable storage medium for electronic devices. Furthermore, the molecules can be engineered to store multiple bits of information and to maintain that information for relatively long periods of time before needing to be refreshed.



Fig. 1
Recall the water drop to transistor count comparison, and realize that these multiporphyrins have already demonstrated up to eight stable digital states per molecule.

The technology has future potential to scale to 3D circuits with minimal power dissipation, but initially it will enhance the weakest element of an otherwise standard 2D memory chip. The ZettaCore memory chip looks like a standard memory chip to the end customer; nobody needs to know that it has “nano inside.” The I/O pads, sense amps, row decoders and wiring interconnect are produced with a standard semiconductor process. As a final manufacturing step, the molecules are splashed on the wafer where they self-assemble in the pre-defined regions of exposed metal.


Fig. 2

From a business perspective, the hybrid product design allows an immediate market entry because the memory chip defines a standard product feature set, and the molecular electronics manufacturing process need not change any of the prior manufacturing steps. The inter-dependencies with the standard silicon manufacturing steps are also avoided given this late coupling; the fab can process wafers as they do now before spin coating the molecules. In contrast, new materials for gate oxides or metal interconnects can have a number of effects on other processing steps that need to be tested, which introduces delay (as was seen with copper interconnect).

For these reasons, ZettaCore is currently in the lead in the commercialization of molecular electronics, with a working megabit chip, technology tested to a trillion read/write cycles, and manufacturing partners. In a symbolic nod to the future, Intel co-founder Les Vadasz (badge #3), has just joined the Board of Directors of ZettaCore. He was formerly the design manager for the world's first DRAM, EPROM and microprocessor.

Generalizing from the ZettaCore experience, the early revenue in molecular electronics will likely come from simple 1D structures such as chemical sensors and self-assembled 2D arrays on standard substrates, such as memory chips, sensor arrays, displays, CCDs for cameras and solar array assembly.



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HereForNow
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« Reply #130 on: September 09, 2007, 03:52:21 pm »

Nurse Cell Technology as discussed.
Controlling production, and key design

The implacations of using these technologies in space the way we discussed earlier on.


The Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment (CanX) program is only Canadian picosatellite program at present. It is operated by the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Space Flight Laboratory (UTIAS/SFL). The program's objectives are to involve graduate students in the process of spaceflight development, and to provide low-cost accesss to space for scientific research and the testing of nanoscale devices. The CanX projects include CanX-1, CanX-2, and the BRIght-star Target Explorer (BRIGHT).

CanX-1 only switches into the detumbling/torquing mode when it is instructed to do so. It is for reducing the tumbling rate of the nanosatellite so that any images taken are not blurred as a result of CanX-1's motion. This mode can also be used to increase the tumbling rate of CanX-1 so that images can be taken in multiple directions without long delays. It uses maximum power when all three magnetorquers and the magnetometer are on simultaiously, and all payloads are switched off because sufficient power may not be available.

Remember our spider-like robots? Seems that it's all falling into place now huh?
What do you think SunGate? Q?

« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 10:01:26 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #131 on: September 09, 2007, 05:47:13 pm »

Proposed machanical processes.


Now if we are going to stick to a design that will ressemble the giant bucky ball, let's think about the purpose of the inner most sphere we'll call #1., for now. Then the purpose of the one that will serve as a collector/manufacturing/mineral refinment and so...We can call it #2.
Last we have the purpose of the outer most sphere #3. All of these spheres work to sustain themselves in every aspect of purpose to preserve us and offer proper sheilding.

Using spectral analysis: http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/asca/abc/node9.html to sift useful material from hazzardous, the refinement process can be broken down structural conponents of materials using hot, cold, and H-effects to separate and clear them of contaminations to purest form and then combined with nanocomputers for later uses in construction, and everything else.


In the first class of instruments, scientists use the wave-like nature of electromagnetic radiation. A prism bends the incoming light (refraction), and how much it bends depends on the wavelength. Use a slit to block out any unwanted light, place a prism behind the slit, and record the image (using a photographic plate, for example, or an electronic camera). The position along one direction of the image corresponds to the wavelength. The combination of a dispersive element (something that divides light into its component wavelength, the prism in this case) and an imaging detector makes a spectrograph. Instead of a prism, you can use a grating (a grating makes use of diffraction, another property of waves) as the dispersive element. In fact, this is more common in modern spectrographs.

In the second class of instrument, scientists use the particle-like nature of electromagnetic radiation. Each photon (a packet of radiation) carries a certain amount of energy. Most detectors used in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy are capable of measuring the energy of each incoming photon --- for specific detector types, see the X-ray Detectors section. This is very different from optical astronomy, where most detectors cannot do this --- this is because X-ray and gamma-ray photons are generally fewer in number but carry more energy per particle. It's much easier to measure the energy of an X-ray photon than that of an optical photon.

Different types of instruments have different strengths and weaknesses. For example, dispersive spectrographs (the first type) are generally better at distinguishing neighboring wavelengths than the second (non-dispersive) types. On the other hand, with the latter, you get imaging and spectroscopic informations at the same time, which you cannot do with a dispersive instrument.
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HereForNow
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« Reply #132 on: September 09, 2007, 07:08:33 pm »



Energy storage from refined materials



One more artical that speaks of crystalised energy, for the refinement process:
Article from _www.realitysandwich.com_ (http://www.realitysandwich.com)   
For the past century, mainstream science has marched to the drum of modern   
convenience, producing a dazzling array of inventions to make our lives more   
comfortable, more entertaining and more productive. This Disneyland vision has   
unfortunately led us away from a path of economic and ecological
sustainability  into a dead end world powered by fossil fuels. What can possibly change
this  situation?
Several long forgotten principles of electromagnetism and something called  “
Zero-Point Energy” (ZPE) have reemerged in recent years as a central part of   
the search for free energy. This includes three revolutionary technologies: 1)
 wireless transmission of electricity, 2) free electrostatic energy and 3)   
passive electrical propulsion. Together, these technologies could bring about a
 catalytic change in the world, reducing our dependence on fossil fuels while
 rearranging the planet’s politico-economic landscape.   
To understand ZPE, we need to begin with a theory. Several new theories   
describe it as the residual energy resonating in a “space lattice” [The  Genesis
of Electromagnetic and Gravitational Forces, Peter Grandics, Ph.D,  2002].
This view proposes space is actually a cubic arrangement of spiraling  “energy
vortices” that fill space perfectly as a non-compressible lattice.  Manipulating
the space lattice and tapping into its energy vortices then becomes  a
unifying goal of ZPE research.
In this model of the universe, everything is described as some form of   
crystallized energy. Matter is said to originate from “angular energy” that has   
crystallized into a molecular lattice. Applying pressure causes matter to   
crystallize further and take on a larger more visible geometry, like that of a   
hexagonal quartz crystal or octahedral diamond. As things crystallize, they   
become more stable, coherent and resonant.
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HereForNow
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« Reply #133 on: September 09, 2007, 07:15:23 pm »

It's your choice! Not NASA's....
However, this is what they think.


FROM NASA:


It's been done before; you should be concentrating on Mars.
The moon is the stepping stone to Mars

 A mission to go directly to Mars without first developing the capability on the moon might be within the resources of the government, but we haven't seen a way to make it work as a commercial enterprise. We whole-heartedly support the NASA administrator's proposal that the U.S. government mount an international manned expedition to Mars, especially if they leave the moon for private enterprise.

Our goal is to establish a system where people can earn a living from space development. Once people are earning a living from it, without having to rely on tax money, progress will continue without bound. For this to happen, the finances have to work every step of way. As best we can analyze it, a private manned mission to Mars would require far too much capital investment in research and development, and return far too little revenues, for such a mission to be financially viable.

The moon's industrial infrastructure will make Mars possible

The equations change, however, if we first establish an industrial and economic infrastructure on the moon. By leveraging a Mars mission with metals and fuel derived from lunar resources, and by supporting it with the local population and industrial capabilities of the moon, we can bring Mars missions within the realm of private enterprise.

Most of the systems we will need for a Mars mission can be developed and tested on the moon. We won't be able to study the effects of the corrosive atmosphere of the red planet or long-term exposure to extreme cold. Except for those factors, however, we should be able to develop all the systems we will need to support our crew on the long journey to Mars in the relatively accessible environment of the moon. We will be able to have our crew test the habitat systems for a two-year Mars mission in a spaceborne evironment; but putting that habitat on the moon near our developing lunar community, we provide them a path to safety when we discover problems with our engineering. We can tune up the design, and wait to go on to Mars until we get it right.

To get to Mars, launch from the moon

Launching for Mars from the surface of the moon also give us a tremendous advantage because we will be able to use a mass driver, reacting against the mass of the moon, for our intial injection into the trans-Mars trajectory. This reduces the total mass our of spacecraft by at least a factor of four, perhaps as much as three million pounds.

The moon is the front door to the universe

All these factors point us toward the moon as the logical step for private enterprise in space. If you want to go, and want to stay, the moon is the front door to the universe.

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Volitzer
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« Reply #134 on: September 09, 2007, 11:35:19 pm »

NASA is an Illuminati front.

They have as much interest in space truths as the Communists did with honest media.
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