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Private Enterprise- To mars

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Author Topic: Private Enterprise- To mars  (Read 6703 times)
Qoais
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« Reply #90 on: August 28, 2007, 10:03:09 pm »

Gee, bucky balls within bucky balls.  This is what I figure Iapetus looks like on the inside.  Sacred geometry you say?  What's so sacred about a bucky ball?
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
HereForNow
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« Reply #91 on: August 29, 2007, 03:49:07 pm »

Gee, bucky balls within bucky balls.  This is what I figure Iapetus looks like on the inside.  Sacred geometry you say?  What's so sacred about a bucky ball?

That fact that until they were discovered, we had no clue for one. Second I would say the geometry involved. These were naturally made, yet geometrically shaped. What is more sacred then nature?  Wink
The Shimizu TRY 2004 Mega-City Pyramid is a proposed project for construction of a massive pyramid over Tokyo Bay in Japan. The structure would be 12 times higher than the Great Pyramid at Giza, and would house 750,000 people. If built, it will be the largest man-made structure on Earth. The structure would be 2,004 meters (6,575 feet) high and would answer Tokyo's increasing lack of space.

The proposed structure is so large that it cannot be built with currently available materials, due to their weight. The design relies on the future availability of super-strong lightweight materials based on carbon nanotubes.






Look at a possible product of this technology we've been discussing.
And then we have this little project involving the Trans-Atlantic Tunnel.


I'm just thinking inspiring thoughts ofcourse. Thing is, everything we know today was usually considered to be impossible until someone actually did it.

Even the nano-cables manufactured by robots that ressemble spiders is one of the proposed ideas for building the Mega-City Pyramid by Japanese Engineers. Research it.
This is why I think it's possible, and very likely that someone is going to eventually design a giant flying bucky ball to serve as long-term space traveling vehical, complete with human habitats.

I've posted the best information I could find (and then some) on current projects that were remotely close to what might/could be part of the design, and habitat for long durations. Right down to artificial photosynthesis in living plants and beyond. You mentioning a bucky ball, sparked a great idea for future science. LOL
Cheers! Q, your great fun to speculate with. Thank you for being so inspiring to my/and everyone's imaginations.

« Last Edit: August 29, 2007, 10:51:40 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

Qoais
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« Reply #92 on: August 29, 2007, 11:39:07 pm »

 Embarrassed  This is me, bowing  Smiley

Quote
Even the nano-cables manufactured by robots that ressemble spiders is one of the proposed ideas for building the Mega-City Pyramid by Japanese Engineers. Research it.


I did.  Where do you think I got the idea?  Grin

Fabulous pictures.  I watched a show on TV one night, that was all about this super-structure in Japan and that's where I learned that graphite nanotubes were being considered for use.  the design of this building is totally incredible.  It would sit out in the water on a little spit of land, and every square inch would be used for a purpose.  They discussed waste disposal, fresh air, sunlight, travelling within the structure, etc. etc.  Totally awesome.  The only thing I didn't like about it, was that it was right out there where the first tsunami coming in would hit it broadside.

Did you happen to see Mars the other night?  I didn't.  My sister didn't either and she lives up-country where it was supposedly the best spot for viewing.  Oh well. 
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

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HereForNow
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« Reply #93 on: August 30, 2007, 05:22:22 am »

LOL, See we were on the same page then.....

 Smiley

I didn't get to see it either. (Mars)
Fell asleep.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2007, 03:25:28 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #94 on: August 30, 2007, 03:29:43 pm »

What I would really love to do is to try making some of that so called Metal rubber that has investors interests. It descibes in quick detail how to make it on the link I posted earlier on. We all seem to agree that this has to be the material we're looking for to make these future building designs.
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Qoais
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« Reply #95 on: August 30, 2007, 10:00:08 pm »

Sounds complicated and high tech to me.  Have to have those little robot thingys to do the dipping Cheesy
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

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« Reply #96 on: August 31, 2007, 09:57:34 am »

 Smiley  Trans-Atlantic tunnel, eh?  Safe from plane crashes, but not terrorists.  And since the Atlantic is the most volcanically active place on earth, (not the more publicised Pacific Ring of Fire), I'm not sure I want to take a ride on that.  Think I'll stick to the plane, LOL. Cool
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HereForNow
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« Reply #97 on: August 31, 2007, 07:05:36 pm »

Smiley  Trans-Atlantic tunnel, eh?  Safe from plane crashes, but not terrorists.  And since the Atlantic is the most volcanically active place on earth, (not the more publicised Pacific Ring of Fire), I'm not sure I want to take a ride on that.  Think I'll stick to the plane, LOL. Cool


Hmm I never thought of that. LOL
Maybe something less pointless is better. A trans-continental mag-lev system would certainly be more traditional.
The whole mag-lev technology would be interesting to use for launching small aerodynamic pods. What velocity would be needed to escape Earth's gravity at a net weight of 167 lbs.? The "spiders" themselves could be made out the metal rubber which seems to adjust well to extremes. Hot, cold, and I'm guessing safe from radiation.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2007, 01:20:49 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #98 on: September 01, 2007, 02:55:53 pm »

 Smiley  Happy Labor Day Week-end folks...
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HereForNow
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« Reply #99 on: September 02, 2007, 04:35:35 pm »



Now you have this for a very inspiring idea. Then:



Can you see a potential design difference that would actually enhance the entire structural integrity. As for launching robots:


 Grin

Or launching from South America using an under-ground rail that would incline unto a tower half the height of a mountain.
 
« Last Edit: September 02, 2007, 08:58:41 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #100 on: September 03, 2007, 07:37:27 pm »

Making materials and robots that self-assemble

Self-assembly and tissue engineering are about copying nature at a more basic level -- how things grow and form. Self-assembly is a broad concept that promises to enable molecular-sized machines, robots that build themselves, and ways of growing replacement parts for humans.

Self-assembly is a key strategy for nanotechnology because it promises to make it easier to construct things at the size-scale of molecules. It is also a key strategy in building machines at the visible scale that repair and reconfigure themselves. And tissue engineering, which involves guiding nature in growing replacement parts for humans, could become a significant part of the medical tool kit in the next decade.

Nanowires are poised to become a fundamental building block of important technologies like computer chips and chemical sensors. Scientists have gotten good at growing nanowires; the main barrier to their widespread use is finding ways to control them so they can be arranged and positioned in bulk to enable practical manufacturing methods.

Making good on an old promise

Videoconferencing is a decades-old, seemingly simple idea that has struggled to live up to its potential. Advances in computer vision, projectors and screens promise to realize the dream of making videoconferencing a common and relatively lifelike experience.

Computer Vision

Advances in computer vision and image processing enable a pair of different areas: making machines that see as well as humans do, and making machines that see in ways humans can't.

In the realm of seeing in ways that humans can't, a camera that can pull off a classic magic trick -- reading a playing card facing away from the camera -- has advanced efforts aimed at collecting all of the visual information about a scene by sensing light scattered off objects within it.

The project, in addition to enabling the impressive card trick, combines a digital camera and a digital projector to show a scene from the point of view of the projector as well as that of the camera. The advances are a step toward using a camera to collect enough information to create views of a scene from any angle under any lighting condition. (Camera sees behind objects, TRN June 1/8, 2005)

Another advance gives computers the relatively simple ability -- for humans -- to glance at a desk top and recognize the printed documents lying on it. Combining this with computers' traditional strong suit of file management results in a system that can answer questions like Where is the third quarter budget report? with the information that the report is in the right hand pile four pages down. (Video organizes paper, TRN January 12/19, 2005)

Any needed repairs to humans could be made using these technologies in space.
Advances computing could even use electrostatic emitters to manipulate DNA to reassemble vital organs
with the help of nano-sized nurse cells injected into the blood.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2007, 07:43:27 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #101 on: September 03, 2007, 07:50:36 pm »

A pair of clean energy advances are also worthy of mention. A spray-on material that harvests infrared light could lead to cheap solar cells that can be painted onto surfaces. And titanium dioxide nanotubes that serve as a catalyst for extracting hydrogen from water using sunlight could make a clean method of generating hydrogen fuel more practical.



One more thing on the subject that makes our inner most structure more then practical in use.
Self-Assembly

Self-assembly is among the most common processes in the natural world. In the context of technology, self-assembly is the practice of harnessing natural forces to cause objects to assemble themselves into useful configurations.

The champion of self-assembly is DNA, the molecule that encodes the instructions for making the proteins that control life's processes. Researchers have been using DNA to self-assemble various structures and devices for several years.

In a recent project, scientists made short strands of artificial DNA spontaneously assemble into a fractal pattern known as a Sierpinski triangle. The work demonstrated that theoretically possible to program DNA to carry out any type of computation and nanoscale fabrication. (Programmed DNA forms fractal, TRN April 6/13, 2005)

A related development that deserves mention is a DNA machine that links molecules, opening a route to making sophisticated materials molecule-by-molecule.

Related to the notion of self-assembly are machines that reproduce, reconfigure and repair themselves. In a significant milestone, researchers developed simple modular robots that reproduce themselves. The robots consist of cubes that can rotate on a diagonal axis and attach to each other. Given a supply of the cubes in the right places, a machine can assemble a copy of itself, which in turn can go on to assemble another copy, which in turn can assemble another... (Machine reproduces itself, TRN May 18/25, 2005)

Tissue Engineering

A long-standing dream of biotechnology researchers is the ability to grow replacement organs. One of the main challenges to growing replacement organs is finding ways to get blood vessels to form inside the tissue before it is placed inside the body.

Researchers have brought tissue engineering a significant step forward with a method for growing muscle tissue that contains blood vessels. They also showed that tissue grown using the method survives better in mice and rats than tissue formed using previous techniques.

The key to the breakthrough was seeding several types of cells on a three-dimensional scaffold to form skeletal muscle tissue. (Cell combo yields blood vessels, TRN June 29/July 6, 2005)

Cells also feature prominently in a biochip development that deserves mention: a sensor that measures changes in the size of cells, including human cancer cells and bacteria, in order to quickly gauge the cells' reactions to changes in their environment like anticancer drugs.

A new shape-shifting material also deserves mention. It could bring about stents and sutures that automatically undo themselves when immersed in water.

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HereForNow
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« Reply #102 on: September 03, 2007, 07:52:19 pm »

Now, how feisible is it too build now?
 Smiley

I will be looking to research more possibilities on this. In Fact;
Dipping the positively charged cotton into the negatively charged silver nanoparticle solution resulted in the particles clinging to the cotton fibers.

Silver possesses natural antibacterial qualities that are strengthened at the nanoscale, thus giving Ong's dress the ability to deactivate many harmful bacteria and viruses. The silver infusion also reduces the need to wash the garment, since it destroys bacteria, and the small size of the particles prevents soiling and stains.

The denim jacket includes a hood, sleeves and pockets with soft, gray tweed cotton embedded with palladium nanoparticles, about 5-10 nanometers in length. To create the material, Dong placed negatively charged palladium crystals onto positively charged cotton fibers.
http://www.physorg.com/news97384337.html

This list of things these materials can do is an ever growing industrial dream.
Any company out there that is willing to capitalize on these possibilities could stand to eventually become a fortune 500 company. Then the funding for major projects is available.
Research as many possible businesses that could stand to gain by using alternative technologies like the ones we have been discussing here. I have a list of 9 so far that would make a great business plan to present to potential investors. The idea is to know your approach, and look for the no's first.
Eventually someone will say yes, and then you have a product.

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mdsungate
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« Reply #103 on: September 04, 2007, 08:17:40 am »

 Smiley 
Quote
Silver possesses natural antibacterial qualities that are strengthened at the nanoscale,

And we use gold in all our circuits.  Maybe this is why gold and silver have been the most valued metals since time immorable.   Wink
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HereForNow
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« Reply #104 on: September 04, 2007, 04:00:39 pm »

Smiley 
Quote
Silver possesses natural antibacterial qualities that are strengthened at the nanoscale,

And we use gold in all our circuits.  Maybe this is why gold and silver have been the most valued metals since time immorable.   Wink

Now with that in mind, think of the many different things we could be doing for living.  Wink
I love to build homes and run cnc lathe. However, I have always wanted to learn more about what it really takes to put something in space. This thread if anything, may yet teach us something about what it would actually take.
I'm hoping anyway. Besides, I haven't seen any other international plans to do anything besides **** our planet of it's human element. One of the reasons I think this is so interesting is because of how possible it may actually be to really do it.

I surely couldn't fund something like this. Yet if someone out there does have the means to it, then I would encourage them to atleast consider our collective input on this whole thing. Mean time, I will see what else would be required to begin a private enterprise commited to getting to Mars. As well as staying on topic!
 Smiley
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