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Private Enterprise- To mars

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Qoais
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« Reply #75 on: August 23, 2007, 02:49:06 pm »

ANOTHER QUOTE FROM QOAIS:


Quote
Why do we have to lift any material off the earth to build in Space when the material is already out there floating around?

That was a quote from 3D - not me Grin

I can't remember where I read this, it was recent, that we'd have to create an "energy" pulse in our sphere like the energy the earth puts out.  They create this for the space station workers as apparently they'd die without it.

I guess we'd have to put firstly put together a team to determine exactly what the requirements are for sustaining life for lengthy intervals on a constructed planet.  Once that's figured out, we'd then have to figure out how to incorporate all the needs into our design.  We know we need certain foods on a regular basis for good health, we need so many hours of sunshine as well.  Now I find that we need these "vibrations" or energies that the earth puts out and who knows what else?

We'd need a system for collecting water cause it sure as hell isn't going to rain on our "planet" until we get some atmosphere happening.  I think we would have to do a mock up here on earth first actually, to see what all could and would go wrong.  If there is no gravity, there would have to be pressurized compartments where people can go, there has to be pumps to pump liquids since gravity feed wouldn't work, etc. etc.

The more one considers all that needs doing, the more I think we really should finance a trip to Iapetus.  Reverse engineering sure sounds a lot easier that starting from scratch Cheesy
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

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HereForNow
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« Reply #76 on: August 23, 2007, 08:57:21 pm »

Hierarchical Photosynthetic Systems
for Photochemical Energy Conversion:
Natural Photosynthesis

The goal of this program is to identify the mechanisms
responsible for optimization of photochemical energy
conversion in natural photosynthesis, and to use this
information for the development of artificial photochemical
systems with enhanced photochemical energy conversion.
Specifically, this project investigates the correlations
between sequential electron transfer with static and
dynamic structures in natural and artificial systems, and
investigates strategies for linking ultrafast, light-induced,
one-electron transfer to slower, energy-conserving redox
and electrochemical processes in artificial photosynthetic
systems using bio-mimetic, hierarchical molecular
architectures. Novel approaches include the use of
isotopically labeled photosynthetic proteins for analysis of
the structure and function of natural photosynthetic systems,
metal-oxide colloids as bio-mimetic photochemical charge
generators, time-resolved and spin polarized electron
paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies for analysis of
sequential electron transfer and electron donor/acceptor
geometries, time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy
for analysis of metal ion structure and function in photosynthetic
chemistry, and the use of X-ray and neutron scattering
techniques for resolving molecular structure and structural
dynamics of photosynthetic assemblies in disordered media.

http://chemistry.anl.gov/photosynthesis/hierarchical_systems.html

For the sake of a moon sized object, plant life is like gold in space.
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HereForNow
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« Reply #77 on: August 23, 2007, 10:43:14 pm »

The US Army hopes, within a few years, to deploy a plasma shield – a machine that generates a protective screen of dazzling mid-air explosions – to stun and disorient an enemy.

The device uses a technology known as dynamic pulse detonation (DPD). A short but intense laser pulse creates a ball of plasma, and a second laser pulse generates a supersonic shockwave within the plasma to generate a bright flash and a loud bang.

The Plasma Acoustic Shield System will eventually combine a dynamic pulse detonation laser with a high power speaker for hailing or warning, and a dazzler light source. PASS has already been demonstrated by the system's makers, Stellar Photonics.

"It uses a programmed pattern of rapid plasma events to create a sort of wall of bright lights and reports (bangs) over the coverage area," says Keith Braun of the US Army's Advanced Energy Armaments Systems Division at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey, US, where the system is being tested.

Force delivery
Braun puts the maximum range of the system at around a hundred metres. But he says the PASS laser is unlikely to be used as a weapon, in its current format, since it lacks sufficient power. Unlike other high-power lasers which burn a target, the DPD relies on a shockwave. Braun says it would take several minutes to burn through a piece of paper using the laser.

"It is fair to say that any stunning or disabling of a target individual would require additional force on target," says Braun. "The current state-of-the-art in portable, rugged laser systems is not at the point of sufficient power."

However, he does not rule out the possibility altogether: "This type of capability is at the core of what we eventually expect from the technology."

Indeed, PASS may be the first step towards a man-portable, tuneable laser weapon that could be used in both non-lethal and lethal modes. Stellar Photonics, which has a $2.7 million contract to build PASS , plans to develop smaller and more powerful versions in future.

http://technology.newscientist.com/article/dn11723

Plasma sheilding, or even an electromagnetic feild would prevent leathal radiations from killing our crew.
Generating them is up to the experts who stole the research on this.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 10:46:25 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #78 on: August 23, 2007, 10:54:43 pm »

Kinetic <p>Multiwalled carbon nanotubes, multiple concentric nanotubes precisely nested within one another, exhibit a striking telescoping property whereby an inner nanotube core may slide, almost without friction, within its outer nanotube shell thus creating an atomically perfect linear or rotational bearing. This is one of the first true examples of molecular nanotechnology, the precise positioning of atoms to create useful machines. Already this property has been utilized to create the world's smallest rotational motor and a nanorheostat. Future applications such as a gigahertz mechanical oscillator are envisioned.

buckypaper: a thin sheet made from nanotubes that are 250 times stronger than steel and 10 times lighter that could be used as a heat sink for chipboards, a backlight for LCD screens or as a faraday cage to protect electrical devices/aeroplanes. <p>chemical nanowires: Carbon nanotubes additionally can also be used to produce nanowires of other chemicals, such as gold or zinc oxide. These nanowires in turn can be used to cast nanotubes of other chemicals, such as gallium nitride. These can have very different properties from CNTs - for example, gallium nitride nanotubes are hydrophilic, while CNTs are hydrophobic, giving them possible uses in organic chemistry that CNTs could not be used for.

computer circuits: A nanotube formed by joining nanotubes of two different diameters end to end can act as a diode, suggesting the possibility of constructing electronic computer circuits entirely out of nanotubes. Because of their good thermal properties, CNTs can also be used to dissipate heat from tiny computer chips. The longest electricity conducting circuit is a fraction of an inch long.(Source: June 2006 National Geographic).

conductive films: A 2005 paper in Science notes that drawing transparent high strength swathes of SWNT is a functional production technique (Zhang et. al., vol. 309, p. 1215). Additionally, Eikos Inc. of Franklin, Massachusetts is developing transparent, electrically conductive films of carbon nanotubes to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in LCDs, touch screens, and photovoltaic devices. Carbon nanotube films are substantially more mechanically robust than ITO films, making them ideal for high reliability touch screens and flexible displays. Nanotube films show promise for use in displays for computers, cell phones, PDAs, and ATMs.

electric motor brushes: Conductive carbon nanotubes have been used for several years in brushes for commercial electric motors. They replace traditional carbon black, which is mostly impure spherical carbon fullerenes. The nanotubes improve electrical and thermal conductivity because they stretch through the plastic matrix of the brush. This permits the carbon filler to be reduced from 30% down to 3.6%, so that more matrix is present in the brush. Nanotube composite motor brushes are better-lubricated (from the matrix), cooler-running (both from better lubrication and superior thermal conductivity), less brittle (more matrix, and fiber reinforcement), stronger and more accurately moldable (more matrix). Since brushes are a critical failure point in electric motors, and also don't need much material, they became economical before almost any other application.

light bulb filament: alternative to tungsten filaments in incandescent lamps.

magnets: MWNTs coated with magnetite

optical ignition: A layer of 29% iron enriched SWNT is placed on top of a layer of explosive material such as PETN, and can be ignited with a regular camera flash.

solar cells: GE's carbon nanotube diode has a photovoltaic effect. Nanotubes can replace ITO in some solar cells to act as a transparent conductive film in solar cells to allow light to pass to the active layers and generate photocurrent.

superconductor: Nanotubes have been shown to be superconducting at low temperatures.

ultracapacitors: MIT is researching the use of nanotubes bound to the charge plates of capacitors in order to dramatically increase the surface area and therefore energy storage ability.

displays: One use for nanotubes that has already been developed is as extremely fine electron guns, which could be used as miniature cathode ray tubes in thin high-brightness low-energy low-weight displays. This type of display would consist of a group of many tiny CRTs, each providing the electrons to hit the phosphor of one pixel, instead of having one giant CRT whose electrons are aimed using electric and magnetic fields. These displays are known as field emission displays (FEDs).

transistor: developed at Delft, IBM, and NEC.

Chemical
air pollution filter: Future applications of nanotube membranes include filtering carbon dioxide from power plant emissions.

biotech container: Nanotubes can be opened and filled with materials such as biological molecules, raising the possibility of applications in biotechnology.

water filter: Recently nanotube membranes have been developed for use in filtration. This technique can purportedly reduce desalination costs by 75%. The tubes are so thin that small particles (like water molecules) can pass through them, while larger particles (such as the chloride ions in salt) are blocked.

Mechanical
oscillator: fastest known oscillators (> 50 GHz).

liquid flow array: Liquid flows up to five orders of magnitude faster than predicted through array.

slick surface: slicker than Teflon and waterproof.

In electrical circuits
Carbon nanotubes have many properties—from their unique dimensions to an unusual current conduction mechanism—that make them ideal components of electrical circuits. Currently, there is no reliable way to arrange carbon nanotubes into a circuit.

The major hurdles that must be jumped for carbon nanotubes to find prominent places in circuits relate to fabrication difficulties. The production of electrical circuits with carbon nanotubes are very different from the traditional IC fabrication process. The IC fabrication process is somewhat like sculpture - films are deposited onto a wafer and pattern-etched away. Because carbon nanotubes are fundamentally different from films, carbon nanotube circuits can so far not be mass produced.

Researchers sometimes resort to manipulating nanotubes one-by-one with the tip of an atomic force microscope in a painstaking, time-consuming process. Perhaps the best hope is that carbon nanotubes can be grown through a chemical vapor deposition process from patterned catalyst material on a wafer, which serve as growth sites and allow designers to position one end of the nanotube. During the deposition process, an electric field can be applied to direct the growth of the nanotubes, which tend to grow along the field lines from negative to positive polarity. Another way for the self assembly of the carbon nanotube transistors consist in using chemical or biological techniques to place the nanotubes from solution to determinate place on a substrate.

Even if nanotubes could be precisely positioned, there remains the problem that, to this date, engineers have been unable to control the types of nanotubes—metallic, semiconducting, single-walled, multi-walled—produced. A chemical engineering solution is needed if nanotubes are to become feasible for commercial circuits.

As fiber and film
One application for nanotubes that is currently being researched is high tensile strength fibers. Two methods are currently being tested for the manufacture of such fibers. A French team has developed a liquid spun system that involves pulling a fiber of nanotubes from a bath which yields a product that is approximately 60% nanotubes. The other method, which is simpler but produces weaker fibers uses traditional melt-drawn polymer fiber techniques with nanotubes mixed in the polymer. After drawing, the fibers can have the polymer component burned out of them leaving only the nanotube or they can be left as they are.

Ray Baughman's group from the NanoTech Institute at University of Texas at Dallas produced the current toughest material known in mid-2003 by spinning fibers of single wall carbon nanotubes with polyvinyl alcohol. Beating the previous contender, spider silk, by a factor of four, the fibers require 600 J/g to break In comparison, the bullet-resistant fiber Kevlar is 27–33 J/g. In mid-2005 Baughman and co-workers from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization developed a method for producing transparent carbon nanotube sheets 1/1000th the thickness of a human hair capable of supporting 50,000 times their own mass. In August 2005, Ray Baughman's team managed to develop a fast method to manufacture up to seven meters per minute of nanotube tape. Once washed with ethanol, the ribbon is only 50 nanometers thick; a square kilometer of the material would only weigh 30 kilograms.

In 2004 Alan Windle's group of scientists at the Cambridge-MIT Institute developed a way to make carbon nanotube fiber continuously at the speed of several centimetres per second just as nanotubes are produced. One thread of carbon nanotubes was more than 100 metres long. The resulting fibers are electrically conductive and as strong as ordinary textile threads.

http://www.buckyrules.com/index.php/Main_Page#Electromagnetic
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 11:08:05 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #79 on: August 23, 2007, 11:05:48 pm »

Until a few years ago, there were two known forms of pure carbon, graphite and diamond. Then an improbable-seeming third form of carbon was discovered: a hollow cluster of 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. Buckminsterfullerene or "buckyballs"--named for the American architect R. Buckminster Fuller, whose geodesic domes had a similar structure--is the roundest, most symmetrical large molecule known. It is exceedingly rugged and very stable, capable of surviving the temperature extremes of outer space. At first, however, the molecule was a mystery wrapped in an enigma. But when a convenient way of making this molecule, also known as C60, was discovered, it set off an explosion of research among chemists, physicists, and materials scientists to uncover the molecule's secrets. Investigators soon discovered a whole family of related molecules, including C70, C84 and other "fullerenes"--clusters as small as C28 and as large as a postulated C240.These unusual molecules turn out to have extraordinary chemical and physical properties.They react with elements from across the periodic table and with the chemical species known as free radicals--key to the polymerization processes widely used in industry--thus opening up the fullerenes to the manipulative magic of organic chemists. When a fullerene is "doped" by inserting just the right amount of potassium or cesium into empty spaces within the crystal, it becomes a superconductor--the best organic superconductor known. More important, because C60 is a relatively simple system, it may help physicists master the still mysterious theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Speculation and some hard work on potential applications began almost immediately after the discovery of buckyballs. Possible applications of interest to industry include optical devices; chemical sensors and chemical separation devices; production of diamonds and carbides as cutting tools or hardening agents; batteries and other electrochemical applications, including hydrogen storage media; drug delivery systems and other medical applications; polymers, such as new plastics; and catalysts. Catalysts, in fact, appear to be a natural application for fullerenes, given their combination of rugged structure and high reactivity. Experiments suggest that fullerenes which incorporate alkali metals possess catalytic properties resembling those of platinum. The C60 molecule can also absorb large numbers of hydrogen atoms--almost one hydrogen for each carbon--without disrupting the buckyball structure. This property suggests that fullerenes may be a better storage medium for hydrogen than metal hydrides, the best current material, and hence possibly a key factor in the development of new batteries and even of non-polluting automobiles based on fuel cells. A thin layer of the C70 fullerene, when deposited on a silicon chip, seems to provide a vastly improved template for growing thin films of diamond. It is too early to make reliable forecasts of commercial potential, although the early indications are that buckyballs may represent a technological bonanza when their properties are fully understood. Yet it is important to note that the discovery of this curious molecule and its cousins was serendipitous, made in the course of fundamental experiments aimed at understanding how long-chain molecules are formed in outer space. It is a strong reminder that fundamental science is often the wellspring of advanced technology in ways that are completely unpredictable.

http://www.3rd1000.com/bucky/bucky.htm

If your willing to do the reading there is a ton of very positive resulting information that does encourage consideration.
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HereForNow
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« Reply #80 on: August 23, 2007, 11:12:53 pm »

A major undertaking in artificial gravity research is being prepared at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston, overseen by NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Starting next year at UTMB, a corps of individuals will partake in bed rest studies that reproduce the effects of weightlessness, with half that group also rotated once a day on a centrifuge.

The new centrifuge has been built for NASA by Wyle Laboratories, headquartered in El Segundo, California, for use in studying the effects of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the negative effects of long-term microgravity on the human body. That newly-built centrifuge has recently been installed at UTMB. "It's a really beautiful device," Young said.

Young is co-investigator for the work, teamed with William Paloski, principal scientist, in the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center.

The NASA-sponsored research is divided into two phases. The first phase is using the short radius centrifuge -- which has a radius of 10 feet (three meters) radius to support NASA's Artificial Gravity Pilot Study. A second phase will include significant enhancements to the centrifuge design to provide support for a multinational artificial gravity project that would involve Germany and Russia, Young added.

The Artificial Gravity Project Pilot Study involves test subjects being placed in a six degree head-down bed-rest position which simulates the effects of microgravity on a human body. The test subjects are then positioned in the short radius centrifuge and subjected up to 2.5 Gs at their feet to simulate a gravity environment.

"As far as I'm concerned," Young concluded, "the purpose of all these studies is not to show how to use artificial gravity. Rather, it is to determine whether or not artificial gravity is an acceptable solution."

http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/artificial_gravity_041125.html
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HereForNow
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« Reply #81 on: August 25, 2007, 08:37:48 am »

It is a lot of reading below this post to cover, however it's all based on what facts have been found in the related science.  Smiley It makes what were doing feisible. If nothing else, discovery channels could make a computer generated image for a movie showing the idea.
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HereForNow
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« Reply #82 on: August 25, 2007, 10:29:23 am »

Hey while were at it we can give our robot civil rights too....   Angry

LOL
Sorry, I can't stand the decisions this country makes sometimes.
Grrrr
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Qoais
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« Reply #83 on: August 25, 2007, 10:38:47 am »

Geez, imagine all the money spent on these machines.  Private enterprise could never match the government money.  I wonder what carnival ride will be developed from this new technology Grin Grin  Most of the spectacular carnival rides we have now were based on testing done for astronauts and pilots.
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

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HereForNow
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« Reply #84 on: August 25, 2007, 11:21:34 am »

I think that if they do use these technologies to make roller-coasters, that they can implement electromagnetic boost for launching our robots into space.  Shocked

Ah-ha!
The robots from there could be fitted with anti-gravity technology to continue upwards into space.
Without gravity, the boost could launch them from here to the moon easily.
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Qoais
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« Reply #85 on: August 27, 2007, 12:39:54 am »

Just a reminder that Mars will be within sighting distance tomorrow night, if one is inclined to be up and about around midnight. (That's Pacific Mountain time I think)
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
HereForNow
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« Reply #86 on: August 27, 2007, 04:48:09 am »

Est. Time would be around 8 pm then, right? I have always loved Mars.  Smiley


Anyhow, American/Canadian private enterprise was able to launch humans into space and safely return them to Earth. Now we have Japan and China in a heated competition
to land an unmanned mission on the moon.

Yahoo.com News....
With Asia's biggest powers set to launch their first unmanned lunar missions — possibly as early as next month — the countdown has begun in the hottest space race since the United States beat the Soviet Union to the moon nearly four decades ago.


Back at the ranch-
Nanotechnology could of course be utilized in the construction/composition of the ships structural design as well as its outer hull.    Compare the below article with the eyewitness accounts of the Roswell incident, note the similarities of the materials described by the eyewitnesses during the incident and that of modern nanotechnology. 
   
Japan's space agency said last week that its SELENE lunar satellite is on track for a Sept. 13 launch, following years of delay as engineers struggled to fix mechanical problems.

China, meanwhile, is rumored to be planning a September blastoff for its Chang'e 1 probe, but is coy as to the date.

The Chinese satellite and its Changzheng 3 rocket have passed all tests, and construction of the launch pad is finished, according to the National Space Administration's Web site. Last month, China's minister of defense technology told CCTV that all was ready for a launch "by the end of the year."

Officials have tried to play down the importance of beating each other off the pad, but their regional rivalry is never far below the surface.

"I don't want to make this an issue of win or lose. But I believe whoever launches first, Japan's mission is technologically superior," said Yasunori Motogawa, an executive at JAXA, Japan's space agency. "We'll see which mission leads to the scientific breakthroughs."

China's military-run space program has taken a great leap forward in recent years, and the country sent shock waves through the region in 2003, when it became the first Asian country to put its own astronauts into space.

China also blasted an old satellite into oblivion with a land-based anti-satellite missile, the first such test ever conducted by any nation, including the United States and Russia.

But Japan is right behind China.




I wonder how Japanese or chinese people would veiw our space station's plan?
 Cool If America & Canada can't do it, we could always look to Asia for some assistance in regaurds to potential investors. I know that private enterprise could never match the united states in funding, but international enterprise might.

Besides, I have always loved meeting people from other countries.
Before my Job at Blair left Erie, and returned to Warren PA.
I worked side by side with African, Russian, Bosnian, and Albanian refugees.
Awesome work ethics, and the people themselves were just beautiful in personality and philosophy. Some of the ladies during the holidays they celebrated would bring traditionally prepared dishes to work to share with everyone. I was in my glory atleast once a month. Bosnian Pita, or kabobs, russian deserts, Albanian home-made bread, and so on. Cheese pizza was our contribution and was a very popular item with the exceptions of Russians who eat way healthier foods then probably most of us.
They would snack on water and fruit.

Collectively, we were an intence working machine that managed to accomplish the impossible everyday! Literally.......100,000 individual items of clothing processed, inspected, and warehoused/ or shipped. 2 shifts @ 319 people. Do the math, and it sounds impossible but it was done.

« Last Edit: August 28, 2007, 03:07:59 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #87 on: August 28, 2007, 02:44:45 pm »

So Qoais, have you looked up anything on John Hutchison?

A friend of mine explained something to me that could very well do the job of launching robots into space without rocket technology. Before I attempt to explain it the way he did. You really should investigate the science of the wild self-taught scientist from Vancouver. I also e-mailed him a link direct to this topic. I'm hoping he looks at it atleast.  LOL
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« Reply #88 on: August 28, 2007, 03:12:34 pm »

Hmmmm Thanks to TSM, here is a woderful link Q.

Terrible, horrible things can be done to this millimeters-thick patch of shimmering material crafted by chemists at NanoSonic in Blacksburg, Virginia. Twist it, stretch it double, fry it to 200°C, douse it with jet fuel—the stuff survives. After the torment, it snaps like rubber back to its original shape, all the while conducting electricity like solid metal. “Any other material would lose its conductivity,” says Jennifer Hoyt Lalli, NanoSonic’s director of nanocomposites.

The abused substance is called Metal Rubber, and, according to NanoSonic, its particular properties make it unique in the world of material chemistry. As a result, the company’s small office has been flooded with calls from Fortune 500 companies and government agencies eager to test Metal Rubber’s use in everything from artificial muscles to smart clothes to shape-shifting airplane wings.

At this stage, however, NanoSonic is busy meeting the demand for its 12-inch-by-12-inch samples, which take custom-built robots up to three days to create. That’s speedy, if you consider that Metal Rubber, a product of nanotechnology, must be fabricated molecule by molecule.

The manufacturing process, called electrostatic self-assembly, starts with two buckets of water-based solutions—one filled with positively charged metallic ions, the other with oppositely charged elastic polymers. The robot dips a charged substrate (glass, for example) alternately from one bucket to the next. The dipping slowly builds up tight, organized layers of molecules, bonded firmly by opposing charges. Afterward the substrate is removed, leaving a freestanding sheet of Metal Rubber.

With investor interest booming, Metal Rubber could make its commercial debut within a year or so. Although shape-shifting aircraft wings and sensory robotic gloves are on the horizon, Metal Rubber will probably appear first in more humble, practical roles. Abuse-resistant flexible circuits and wires, for instance, could allow you to do terrible, horrible things to your portable electronics—consequence-free.
http://www.popsci.com/popsci/science/f30c0b4511b84010vgnvcm1000004eecbccdrcrd.html

One more bit of help with this idea, as a friend explained.
Gravity is a result of sub-charged particles both positive (protette) and negative (electrette)  1 electron has zillions of omni snf think just how many electrons every object has.

You can use electrons to run motors to overcome gravity but once the electron flow is shut off the electrette/protette attraction takes over and slows everything to a halt.



Eager Investors! And all the while, we sit here talking about how to get funding.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2007, 03:17:28 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
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« Reply #89 on: August 28, 2007, 07:51:30 pm »



You have all seen this I'm assuming.
An example of sacred geometry. However looking at it, I see a model of an even more enlightening idea about design.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2007, 08:02:46 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

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