Atlantis Online
October 15, 2019, 06:26:52 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Site provides evidence for ancient comet explosion
http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/nationworld/story/173177.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Private Enterprise- To mars

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 35   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Private Enterprise- To mars  (Read 6772 times)
mdsungate
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 683


Hermes, Gateway of the Sun


« Reply #45 on: August 21, 2007, 10:44:37 am »

 Smiley  QOAIS posted a video site in ley lines that reveals that “world banks” are intent on owning and controlling everything.  UNKNOWN and I have both watched the entire two-hour video, and it’s worth the watch if you can get through the beginning.  Roll Eyes

If the video message about world banks is correct, private enterprise IS the only place to turn for this type of a project.  The world banks will charge interest on the loans to finance this project and end up owning Mars as well as Earth, LOL..   

Personally I like your idea of sending the entire space station to Mars.  It makes sense to me.  It kind of reminds me of “the Mayflower” quite apropos actually.    Wink
Report Spam   Logged

Hermes Trismegistus:  “As above, so below.”
HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #46 on: August 21, 2007, 01:33:23 pm »

Well, without having the problem of having to launch hundreds of rockets from the ground to space is a plus. Second, without endangering human to preform the construction of this station it becomes more practical. Robots can work day and night without sleep, food, or water.

Finally, all you have to do is leave the orbit of Earth to sling shot the station to Mars and re-enter a stable orbit.
This thing will be plenty large enough to hold supplies and it doesn't have to be the only one created.
As far as expence, what will it matter if Earth changes cause economic failure?
I think it could be built for next to nothing if we think of it in terms of survival.
Report Spam   Logged

mdsungate
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 683


Hermes, Gateway of the Sun


« Reply #47 on: August 21, 2007, 02:27:16 pm »

 Smiley  Well your plan makes more sense to me than the one set down in “The Case For Mars” by Robert Zubrin. And he’s a degreed scientist with published works!  But just how do you get a plan like this into the hands of people who can help implement it into a reality?  Cool
Report Spam   Logged

Hermes Trismegistus:  “As above, so below.”
HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #48 on: August 21, 2007, 03:55:44 pm »

Well the first thing that any of these ideas need is a good business plan. Second thing they need to do is develope the technology using alternative, low cost materials. If the right investors are able to see the bigger picture in what this kind of technology is capable of accomplishing, more investors will be interested as the stocks in this tech start going up.
Even something like Pyramid City in Japan is a good example of how our space station can be easily designed and constructed.

Manipulating carbon at the cellular level, and telling it what you want it to do is only as tricky as mastering the H-effect and then enhancing it.
This is one of the things that makes a plan like this implementable. Showing them the technology is one of the ways that investors will become more likely to invest.

In theory anyhow. The patent process has to stay out of the loop though until everyone knows about it.
Then, you go through the four steps and then you can invest your own earnings back into the technology that a certain team right here in the forum can assist in developing.
Now one of the things I would love to do is to get Volitzer, TSM, Merlin, and the rest of our tech squad together on this to see what it would take.
 Wink

However, I'm sure that's not going to happen.....
We're probably the only interested parties, LOL.


Knotted nanotube fibers (approximate fiber diameter: 10 microns).


Diagrammatic representation of a nanotube: cylinder with a graphite structure closed at both ends by a fullerene type cap (containing pentagons).
« Last Edit: August 21, 2007, 04:07:46 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #49 on: August 21, 2007, 04:14:29 pm »

 Short Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) 90wt% now available for $250 per gram!

 

Short Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) 60wt% now available for $80 per gram!

Which are actual costs for these materials.

For material on the lost footage of the H-effect, here is a sight that has links and more information on John Hutchison himself.

http://www.americanantigravity.com/hutchison.html

Even more of the technology that would be needed for the project Exodus is already something that our friend John has been into for years.
I've tried several times to contact John to invite him to our forum but he's a busy guy and if we're lucky we might receive an E-mail at the very most.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2007, 04:29:25 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #50 on: August 21, 2007, 04:41:17 pm »

Smiley  Well your plan makes more sense to me than the one set down in “The Case For Mars” by Robert Zubrin. And he’s a degreed scientist with published works!  But just how do you get a plan like this into the hands of people who can help implement it into a reality?  Cool
It's actually more Q's Idea. I'm trying trying to figure out a more practical approach to actually building it.  Cheesy
Now, maybe you would like to tell me what you do for a living and then I'll give you three names.  Cool
Sometimes it's people just like us who reveil to much, and suddenly the goverment steals the idea.
I mean imagine producing a three dimentional picture on a computer screen, hitting enter and suddenly the formation of geometric shapes of all sizes just construct themselves from something that looks like liquid until it's commanded to become ridgid. And this technology exists already. I just have a very small amount of imagination into this idea.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 08:30:36 am by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2007, 04:52:19 pm »

I love the idea of bucky balls, and thank you Q.

Again!
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 08:32:01 am by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #52 on: August 22, 2007, 08:50:58 am »

What they are attempting to do next is;
A number of new technologies will be required to carry out this pioneering mission. These include the landing system on Mars, the Mars ascent vehicle, the rendezvous system in Mars orbit and the Earth re-entry vehicle or capsule. In principle all of these can be tested in a near-Earth environment except for the final qualification of the rendezvous and docking system, which should preferably be carried out in a Mars orbit. The technology required for this Flagship mission will be developed during a series of technology-driven arrow missions.

Some important factors influencing the design and development of the mission are:

Landing site This may remain open for some time until knowledge of the Martian geochemical, biological and environmtnal characteristics progressively improve, through previous missions to the planet. This means that the spacecraft design will have to be sufficiently robust to cope with a variety of different landing sites that will be selected at a later stage of the programme.

Sample size A soil sample of 500 grammes is being considered in line with the recommendations of the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG).

Sample collection A miniature drill will be needed to collect samples of Martian soil at a certain depth. Samples will be taken from underneath the upper layer of soil as this is expected to be completely sterile due to the high level of radiation. The level will be high because unlike the Earth’s atmosphere, that on Mars does not filter radiation. Signs of past forms of life will probably not be found on the surface due to the high oxidisation levels, which destroy identifiable bio-signatures.

Sample protection Careful measures will be needed to protect the sample. On the one hand it will be necessary to avoid contamination of Mars by organisms from Earth and on the other, it will be essential to ensure that no Martian organism – if any exist – contaminates the Earth.
If all goes according to plan, this challenging and complex mission could be launched as early as 2011.

How much of this science could be carried out by a larger manned mission in the event, that our giant flying bucky ball could be created in the next three years?
Report Spam   Logged

mdsungate
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 683


Hermes, Gateway of the Sun


« Reply #53 on: August 22, 2007, 09:44:10 am »

 Smiley  QUOTE FROM HEREFOR NOW:

Quote
Now, maybe you would like to tell me what you do for a living and then I'll give you three names. 


LOL, I’m not sure you’d call what I’m doing a living, LOL.  Currently, I’m just trying to survive and support my wife and four kids!  I’m a music teacher, composer, and would be novelist.  I have a strong science background however, and was going to become a chemist, just before I decided to pursue a musical career and attend the Juilliard School of Music, (a financially dumb move, however rewarding).  My days are currently spent at an in-house division of Zerox at the original GE plant in Schenectady, with an account that is scanning all the millions of technical drawings of turbine generators into an electronic database. It’s very boring at work, but I can make my own hours, (allowing me to give private music lessons), and do things online while the system is busy “thinking”.  If I sell my novel or screenplay things will change.  And right now I’m researching for the next novel, both of which are based on the kind of esoteric knowledge we share here at Atlantis Online.  And by the way, (tying this all back into this particular thread), the characters in my adventure story get to visit “The Face On Mars”, LOL.  Just trying to make all this reading about Mars, pay for itself, I guess, LOL.

Now back to the Bucky balls.  Although I’ve tried to keep up by reading magazines like Scientific American, admittedly I’m not quite up on the kind of micro technology you’re talking about here, (although it sounds like the future of chemistry, LOL.)  Is this liquid you’re talking about capable of reproducing the structure of a microscopic Bucky ball by adding raw material that is not structured?  Because that is what is sounds like you’re saying.  Please elaborate a little on this quote:


Quote
imagine producing a three dimentional picture on a computer screen, hitting enter and suddenly the formation of geometric shapes of all sizes just construct themselves from something that looks like liquid until it's commanded to become ridgid. And this technology exists already.


Exactly how does this work?  Got a web site?  Meanwhile I’ll check out that last link about the Hutchison effect, (this I already know something about, but want to know more). 

   


Report Spam   Logged

Hermes Trismegistus:  “As above, so below.”
Qoais
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3423



« Reply #54 on: August 22, 2007, 10:21:12 am »

"The buckyball, being the roundest of round molecules, is also quite resistant to high speed collisions. In fact, the buckyball can withstand slamming into a stainless steel plate at 15,000 mph, merely bouncing back, unharmed. When compressed to 70 percent of its original size, the buckyball becomes more than twice as hard as its cousin, diamond."

So - we don't have to worry about gathering a bunch of space junk to protect our work station.

Strictly speaking, any tube with nanoscale dimensions, but generally used to refer to carbon nanotubes, which are sheets of graphite rolled up to make a tube. A commonly mentioned non-carbon variety is made of boron nitride, another is silicon. These noncarbon nanotubes are most often referred to as nanowires. The dimensions are variable (down to 0.4 nm in diameter) and you can also get nanotubes within nanotubes, leading to a distinction between multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes. Apart from remarkable tensile strength, nanotubes exhibit varying electrical properties (depending on the way the graphite structure spirals around the tube, and other factors, such as doping), and can be superconducting, insulating, semiconducting or conducting (metallic).

So - we don't need a bunch of wire cables all over the place either.  Just have to figure out how to layer the tubes so that the insulating ones are on the very outside, and the very inside, and the conducting ones are in between. 

Sounds a bit like Tesla's theory that one can just stick a rod in the ground and have free electricity.  If you have a generator to make the electricity, then the nanotubes that the construct are made of, would carry the current. 

Nanotubes can be either electrically conductive or semiconductive, depending on their helicity, leading to nanoscale wires and electrical components. These one-dimensional fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times greater than steel at one sixth the weight, and high strain to failure.

Pictures and audio:

http://online.itp.ucsb.edu/online/qhall_c98/dekker/
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 10:30:05 am by Qoais » Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
mdsungate
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 683


Hermes, Gateway of the Sun


« Reply #55 on: August 22, 2007, 10:41:19 am »

 Shocked  Wow, that’s way cool stuff!  My goodness Qoais, you’re an expert in Egyptian mythology and a science wiz?  You’re as wondrous as these nanotubes.

 But then how practical is the production of this new promising material?  If it costs hundreds per ounce, how practical is it to cover an entire space station with?  And where in do these robots, that Herefornow mentions, come it to play?   Smiley

Report Spam   Logged

Hermes Trismegistus:  “As above, so below.”
HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #56 on: August 22, 2007, 01:23:53 pm »

Well if a robot could be made to carry the materials needed to produce these nanowires, it could spin cables into production. From cables, to layers. Or Billions of bucky balls interlocking into a mega-structure.
That eventually becomes one big bucky ball.

As for any liquid, I was thinking more along the lines of a fine powder that looks like a liquid. Trillions of these bucky balls would ressemble a fine powder. How to get them moving electronically or magnetically, I can't answer because I'm not that educated. To fuse them together, this has an answer and I will research it more tonight to better answer the question.

The goal would be to fabricate sheets made from nano sized materials that robots could manufacture and assemble, by electronically manuvering them to form a number of structural and conductive components.
Building from the inside, out.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 01:47:00 pm by HereForNow » Report Spam   Logged

Qoais
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3423



« Reply #57 on: August 22, 2007, 02:28:28 pm »

Well Sungate, I like to learn all kinds of things, but I'm no expert Grin

As to the cost, I thought graphite was one of the cheapest substances on earth.  But of course, once it's needed for such a specialized purpose, the cost goes thru the roof.  Then you get contractors like the cement companies that give a quote and then use inferior product to increase the profit margin.  And the wheel goes round and round.........

On the other hand, we may have a small problem here:

[edit] Safety issues
See also: Nanotoxicology
Although C60 has been thought in theory to be relatively inert, a presentation given to the American Chemical Society in March 2004 and described in an article in New Scientist on April 3, 2004, suggests the molecule is injurious to organisms. An experiment by Eva Oberdörster at Southern Methodist University, which introduced fullerenes into water at concentrations of 0.5 parts per million, found that largemouth bass suffered a 17-fold increase in cellular damage in the brain tissue after 48 hours. The damage was of the type lipid peroxidation, which is known to impair the functioning of cell membranes. There were also inflammatory changes in the liver and activation of genes related to the making of repair enzymes. These results have been published in "Environmental Health Perspectives" in July 2004.

Pristine C60 can be suspended in water at low concentrations as large clusters often termed nC60. These clusters are spherical clumps of C60 between 250-350 nm in diameter. Thus, nC60 represents a different chemical entity than solutions of C60 in which the fullerenes exist as individual molecules. Recently, results presented at the ACS meeting in Anaheim, CA suggest that nC60 is moderately toxic to water fleas and juvenile largemouth bass at concentrations in water of around 800 ppb. The first study of its kind on marine life, these preliminary results quickly spread across the scientific community. However, the overwhelming evidence of the essential non-toxicity of C60 (not nC60) in previously peer-reviewed articles of C60 and many of its derivatives indicates that these compounds are likely to have little (if any) toxicity, especially at the very low concentration at which it is≈ used (~1-10 µM). [citation needed]

A study published in December 2005 in Biophysical Journal raises a red flag regarding the safety of C60 when dissolved in water. It reports the results of a detailed computer simulation that finds C60 binds to the spirals in DNA molecules in an aqueous environment, causing the DNA to deform, potentially interfering with its biological functions and possibly causing long-term negative side effects in people and other living organisms

Maybe that is why Iapetus is a "dead" star.  Altho I doubt the "star" was submerged in water, but there could be other considerations.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2007, 02:40:53 pm by Qoais » Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
HereForNow
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3278


HUH?


« Reply #58 on: August 22, 2007, 02:48:24 pm »

Well atleast we have a good valid case for what might not work. So the next plan would be to use these materials as sheilding and think of something else that won't endanger human life.

 Grin Nice work though Q.  Wink
Report Spam   Logged

Qoais
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3423



« Reply #59 on: August 22, 2007, 03:01:07 pm »

Perhaps water buckyballs:

http://www.watercluster.com/
Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 35   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy