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Mexico Finds Tunnel, Possible Tombs Under Ruins


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Author Topic: Mexico Finds Tunnel, Possible Tombs Under Ruins  (Read 206 times)
Avenging Angel
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« on: August 04, 2010, 01:28:51 am »

"Up to now, every archaeologist who has worked in Teotihuacan has tried to find the tombs of the rulers," Gomez said.

http://a.abcnews.com/images/Travel/5b0a96283dbb49ba988635a33803f9f3_mn.jpg

A tent marks the site where Mexican archaeologists are working on what they describe as a... Expand
A tent marks the site where Mexican archaeologists are working on what they describe as a mysterious, 100-meter, 100 yard, tunnel found in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010. Archeologists say the tunnel was probably closed intentionally about 200 A.D. and it may well hold chambers with tombs of the rulers of the city founded 2,500 year ago, where the Teotihuacan culture blossomed starting around 100 B.C. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini) Collapse
(AP)

"There is a high possibility that in this place, in the central chamber, we can find the remains of those who ruled Teotihuacan," he added.

The complex of pyramids, plazas, temples and avenues was once the center of a city of more than 100,000 inhabitants and may have been the largest and most influential city in pre-Hispanic North America at the time.

Nearly 2,500 years after the city was founded — and about 2,100 years after the Teotihuacan culture began to flourish there — the identity of its rulers remains a mystery.

The city was built by a relatively little-known culture that reached its height between 100 B.C. and A.D. 750. It was abandoned by the time the Aztecs arrived in the area in the 1300s and gave it the name "Teotihuacan," which means "the place where men become gods."

Luis Barba, of the Anthropological Research Institute of Mexico's National Autonomous University, said that because there are no images, names or other references to rulers among Teotihuacan's rich murals and stone carvings, some experts suggest the city might have had a shared leadership, with rulers alternating between its four precincts.

"People have looked for these rulers for many years," Barba said. "Perhaps they will be found now. There is nothing to rule it out or make it impossible, but at this point, we have nothing."

Gomez said it will take at least two more months of digging before archaeologists can actually enter the tunnel.

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
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