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R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz

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« on: November 12, 2007, 08:04:00 am »


The Colonnade of Amenhotep III Temple of Luxor, Egypt







In 1937 the Alsatian mathematician, philosopher and Egyptologist, R.A.Schwaller de Lubicz began a fifteen year, on-site study of the great temple complex of Luxor. Assisted by a highly trained team of surveyors and architectural draftsman, he assiduously and precisely measured, analyzed and recorded every stone, column, passageway, chamber, inscription and statue in the temple complex. His findings, published in the massive, erudite and highly complex Temple of Man call for a total reexamination and reinterpretation of the entire body of Egyptological theory. Yet, by and large, the seminal work done by Schwaller de Lubicz has been ignored, even abused, by the current Egyptological community. The reasons for this are not hard to find.

Schwaller de Lubicz had profoundly confronted the prevailing archaeological theories concerning the development, mathematical sophistication, religious symbolism, and total culture of the ancient Egyptians. To understand the significance, indeed the radical nature, of what he has done it is important to recognize two matters. One, that the currently popular 'scientific' notions concerning the origin, timing, order and locality of the development of the earliest civilization are nothing more than theories - tentative assumptions given the appearance of authority by the elitist posturing of the academic community - based upon less than two hundred years of piecemeal archaeological study. And two, that those two hundred years of study have been powerfully controlled, directed and biased by the fundamental (and highly arrogant) belief of the European Age of Enlightenment that modern civilizations represent a total advance, especially philosophically and mathematically, over ancient civilizations.

Schwaller de Lubicz has challenged these notions by categorically proving that the Dynastic Egyptians possessed mathematics far superior to that of the Pythagorean Greeks whom they proceeded by more than 1500 years, and that of the Europeans whom they preceded by more than 3000. Furthermore he has demonstrated that Egyptian culture represents a great doctrine in which science, religion, philosophy, and art were altogether fused into one grand and extraordinary synthesis equaled no where else in the entire ancient or modern world. Most contemporary Egyptologists become quite uncomfortable when the research of Schwaller de Lubicz is mentioned. They cannot find fault with the absolute precision of his measurements and scholarship, yet they refuse to see beyond the biases of their 'modern' Eurocentric programming to grasp the astonishing brilliance of Egyptian culture. Readers interested in the life and studies of Schwaller de Lubicz will find a thorough and articulate introduction in the excellent book, 'Serpent in the Sky' by John Anthony West.
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2007, 08:07:47 am »









Built upon the site of a small Middle Kingdom temple, much of the present temple of Luxor was constructed by the 18th Dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III (reigned 1391-1353 BC). A stunningly beautiful double colonnaded court was added by the 19th Dynasty pharaoh Ramses II (reigned 1290-1224 BC). The enormous asymmetric complex, over 800 feet long was built in stages to a design unique in sacred architecture; it is constructed upon three separate axes, and every wall, colonnade and hall is rigorously aligned to one or another of these three axes. Additions made a thousand years later by the last of the Egyptian-born pharaohs, those made a few years later by Alexander the Great, and even those of the Romans, were all aligned according to the original axes, showing that the architectural guidelines ordering the temple were handed down through the generations. These three different axes, skewed as they are, seem to defy logical explanation, yet Schwaller de Lubicz saw within them a deliberate expression of harmony, proportion and extraordinary symbolism.

While it is far too complex a subject to discuss here, Schwaller de Lubicz found in the temple of Luxor a record of the Egyptian's understanding of the cosmic laws of creation and the manner in which spirit becomes manifest as matter. One of his central insights was that the various sections of the human body are incorporated into the proportions of the temple itself (see illustration below), and in the proportions of the various sculptures and wall carvings. John Anthony West tells us:
"Because there is nothing in our society that remotely corresponds to a Temple of Luxor, it is difficult to understand why Egypt should have exercised such infinite pains and genius on what is ultimately a symbolic gesture. It is even more difficult for us to understand the uses to which it was put and the effect it must have had on those exposed to it." West then suggests that "the Temple is in the nature of a magic rite, extending over two millennia, designed to evoke in the beholder an understanding of creation and creative power."

The present author strongly agrees with this idea based upon his own experiences at the temple complex. During a three day period spent at Luxor I repeatedly took copies of the illustrations reproduced below into the temple and experimented with both dowsing and meditation at certain sites. The sites I was primarily interested in were those that corresponded to the general locations of the Hindu chakras if they were to be marked upon the illustration of the temple and skeleton. These particular sites registered a significantly stronger dowsing response with both L rods and a pendulum as compared to non-specific areas within the temple. Meditation yielded similar results. On the sites corresponding to the chakra locations I felt a strong tingling sensation in my entire body, and furthermore a sensation of what I can only call increased physical awareness of the locations of the chakras in my own body. It seems logical to me that these experiences are conditioned by both the power of place inherent in the Luxor area, and by the gathering, amplification and focusing of that power at certain specific sites through the agency of Luxor's extensive sacred geometry.


http://www.sacredsites.com/africa/egypt/luxor.html
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 05:23:15 pm »








The name Schwaller de Lubicz is not one which many people have heard and yet if you scratch below the surface of the works of Hancock, Bauvel and other modern writings on Egypt, Esotericism and ancient civilization, you will find him standing there waiting.

The source for much of the modern re-appraisal of Ancient Egypt comes from the work of John West, who clearly tells us that Schwaller de Lubicz was his inspiration.

Yet, who exactly was Schwaller de Lubicz and why haven’t we heard of him ? The first reason why we have not heard of de Lubicz is that much of his work is still only available in the native tongue of French.

It seems difficult for us conditioned to believe in the supremacy of English as a world language, to realize that there is a vast library of untranslated material which is great import to modern esotericism. Most of the works of Rene Guenon, Julius Evola and Schwaller de Lubicz are still only available in their native tongue.

The second reason why we probably haven’t heard of Schwaller de Lubicz is that he is incredibly difficult to read. Since he believed is the sacredness of language and of number, he used them only with reservation and respect and in a form that demanded slow, meditative consideration. His works cannot be breezed through, they demand digestion. Not something we are used to, being the era of the paperback and streamlined news broadcast with their “two minute” concentration spans.  As his works have been slowly translated (Inner Traditions have released many of his titles including the first release of The Temple of Man, his two volume opus in 1998), it is important to consider his unique insight into the nature of Egyptian civilization.
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 05:26:13 pm »








The foundation of De Lubicz’ vision comes from the sacredness of number and language.

With the ancient Hebrews De Lubicz saw language not as a simple means of communication, but as an interface between man and the divine. When the Sepher Yetzirah saw that YHVH created man with the fire letters of the Hebrew alphabet and St.Johns Gospel saw that the “Word was God”, we have some indication of a deeper understanding of language than our present secular usage.

The same applies to numbers, the greatest secret of the Pythagorean brotherhood was the relationships between numbers, sound and form.

We may wonder why such relationships were important or had any value beyond the purely speculative and this is where De Lubicz’ work is of great significance.

De Lubicz understood through his research into alchemy and Hermerticism that in the traditional view of the universe life was part of a “Great Chain of Being”. From the lowest particle to the greatest deity, all partook of certain characteristics and were linked together into a great scheme of existence. The foundations of this bridge of resonance were within sacred letters and numbers, with vibrations and harmonics.

This had immense practical application, for example, in conjunction with Fulcanelli, De Lubicz was able to use these underlying principles to decode the methods used to create the great windows of Chartes Cathedral. These stained glass windows show the use of certain colours which could not have been created by pigment and which involved a changes in the actual molecular structure of the glass, something which is still considered beyond the state of our present technology.

But by understanding the underlying harmonics of the universe, De Lubicz was able to practice the nearly forgotten alchemical arts and decode this Cathedral.
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 05:27:41 pm »








The significance of such an approach is seen his reconstruction of Pharonic Egypt.

De Lubicz examined the architecture of Ancient Egypt and found  that it had an underlying symbolic code, a magnificent numerical system, which operated as a intiated form of language. By making this deduction he went on to decode the system and find the real, life changing concepts that Egypt was based on. 

From this research he predicted the true age of Pyramids, the water erosion on the Sphinx and even suggested that the Nile had been redirected years before satellite images proved his hypothesis correct.

But the value of his work is not found in such speculation, but in his restoration of the primal language, of the real meaning of perception and the nature of spiritual experience as found in sacred geometry and alchemy.
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« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2007, 05:29:41 pm »








To fully grasp De Lubicz’ vision we need to consider the Egyptian mindset from within the “Great Chain of Being” and remove our modernist and secular theories from the stage.

For a moment consider the Egyptian perception, time, space, direction – all have religious connotations. Time is not simply a clicking of a digital clock, time is measured by the flow of religious festivals, time within the day is correlated to stories about the gods. Every moment hence is sacred and full of spiritual intent.

De Lubicz went further and decoded the architecture of many of the temples, for example, he spent years decoding the Temple of Luxor showing that its design was based on the human body and that its dimensions reflected sacred proportions (similar to those found in Chartes and other cathedrals build on Masonic dimensions).

Yet what does it mean ? What does it matter that a temple is like a human body. The significance can only be understood when we consider the experience of the average Egyptian within a traditional culture based on an appreciation of the unity between the individual, the state and the divine.

As “Jack” the Egyptian approaches the temple, he is not isolated from it. He approaches it at a certain time, correlated to a god or religious concept, from a direction intent with meaning. He is not isolated from the architecture, it is alive. Its form, shape and dimension all communicate to him. He knows they have the same proportions as his body and hence he is part of the architecture, he is connected to the temple and it to him. Further to this, he knows it has been placed in a “sacred location” and hence is connected to his mother land and to his people.

So there is no division, there is a harmonic and unity between the individual, time, space, direction, architecture, land and people.
 
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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2007, 05:32:21 pm »








As the temple rite begins “Jack” the Egyptian does not feel that it is only for the priestclass or that they get more than he does. He knows that he is part of a great chain of being, an organic state where he is linked to all others in the country from the lowest worker to the Pharoah himself. As the Pharoah acts he influences the whole state, as he practices the ancient rites all are affected.

There is not an artificial division between religion, politics, the divine and the secular, the Egyptian experience is one harmonic, one unity which encompasses all aspects. This unity was the foundation for the Egyptian Harmonic, it sustained Egypt for thousands of years, indeed, Egyptian art did not change for some 2,000 years until the advent of Akhenaten and then returned to its “Old style” until its fall.

The great unity of Egypt was its sustaining vision, its essence was not only found in the state or political structure or in the priesthood, but was within every aspect of its expression, from art to architecture, from music to medicine.

Like a hologram, even a single artifact can reveal the language of the greater form.

Schwaller de Lubicz understood this and used the mathematics of the temples to give us a glimpse of the greater vision that of Egypt.
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« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2007, 05:34:09 pm »








" The plan and structure of the world, which, through the Middle Ages and down to the late eighteenth

century most educated men were to accept without question - the conception of the universe as a

" Great Chain of Being, composed of an immense or infinite number of links ranging in hierarchical order

 from the meagerest kinds of existents.. through every possible grade up to the ens perfectissimum".



Great Chain of Being,
Arthur Lovejoy.
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« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2007, 05:36:30 pm »








 
This greater vision was not only found within the Egyptian civilization, while it certainly was its greatest expression.

The traditional worldview underlied much of Medieval thought, though its unity was not expressed as clearly as it was in Egypt.

Since the reference point for modern man is the material world, he judges life by his perceptions and acts accordingly. His life is hence governed by physical desires and material requirements.

This way of life, whether it be Western consumerism or Marxist materialism, was created by the development of the (Western) scientific worldview, whereby man was removed from his place at the center of the universe and reduced to his new status as an "evolved monkey".

Beginning in the 19th century (some would argue earlier) prevailing ideologies began to jettison God, spirituality and the Medieval worldview and replace "superstition" with a "scientific" model based on matter, evolution and technology coupled with a blind belief in progress. This new scientific model was and is a direct contradiction of the earlier "traditional" model, which was based on the "Great Chain of Being".
 

This Great Chain is the traditional view of the universe which is not locked in a simple "nuts and bolts" view, but which encompasses the great span of existence from the very heights of spirit to the depths of the infernal realms.

The Great Chain of Being while expressed in many cultures is not doctrinally specific, it can be found in Hindu, Buddhist, Platonic, Christian and Mystical cosmology, it is found throughout literature from myth and legend to the visions of Dante.
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2007, 05:38:39 pm »






Modern mans vision of reality can be seen like those locked into Plato's cave, he perceives only shadows and presumes these to be real.

This is far more dangerous than we admit, for if we limit our reality to our sense alone then we remove all possibility of ethical or spiritual insight and reduce existence to material banality.

While psychology may wish to somewhat expand our horizons by positing spiritual equivalents within the mind, it is still reductionist and everything is referenced back to the senses and the material world.

If it is from matter we come, then to matter we shall return.

The Harmonic of Ancient Egypt and the sacred mathematics of Pythagoras, the blazing power of language and the divine proportions of architecture reflect a worldview where all was sacred and from the labourer to the Pharoah or king, all partook of the essence of the organic whole.

It is only today with the advent of so-called individual freedom, the scientific method and man-centered political systems that this union has been shattered and modern man is left alienated and lost in a hostile world.

Perhaps DeLubicz work is the glimpse of just how much we have lost.

 

 Reposted from the former website of the Institute of Gnostic Studies.


http://pages.zoom.co.uk/thuban/html/schwaller.htm




MORE HERE:

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,4733.msg43102.html#msg43102
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« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2007, 09:16:22 pm »











The Temple of Man


by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz
Translated from the French by
Deborah Lawlor with Robert Lawlor

Illustrations by Lucy Lamy

1998, Inner Traditions; two volumes in slip case, 544 pp each, 400 b&w illustrations; hardcover, $195.00; ISBN 0-89281-570-1





Publicists for this two-volume book would have us believe that: “The monumental Temple of Man represents the most important breakthrough in our understanding of Ancient Egypt since the discovery of the Rosetta Stone.” I don’t know if even R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz himself (1887-1961) would agree with that unfortunate overstatement on the inside of the dust jacket by the PR people at Inner Traditions, the work’s publisher, but almost certainly no scholarly Egyptologist would. Then, as far as I can tell, Egyptologists have been pretty universally silent on the merits or demerits of Schwaller de Lubicz’s non-traditional concepts. This in spite of the fact that the idea of an Egyptian origin for the Hermetic doctrine has been rehabilitated among some contemporary Egyptologists (see the work of Eric Iversen, Egyptian and Hermetic Doctrine, Copenhagen, 1984). And even today some of Schwaller de Lubicz’s ideas filter into academic publications (see, for instance, figures 47 and 54 in Temples in Ancient Egypt, Byron E. Shafer ed., Cornell, 1997).


There are many reasons for the hesitation in official discourse to take on Schwaller de Lubicz’s ideas, but surely chief among them are the difference in language and approach. And here I do not mean the French that the author wrote in, but rather the language of esoteric philosophy by which he expressed himself, approaching ancient Egypt with his own agenda in order to give voice to his teachings.
He was trained as a chemist, which led to his interest in alchemy and other esoteric arts. Formerly going by René Schwaller, his pursuit and knowledge of the “sacred sciences” prompted Prince O.V. de Lubicz Miosc to confer his family title on the Frenchman in 1919. Schwaller de Lubicz went to Egypt to study her monuments and remained fifteen years, especially examining Luxor Temple in great detail, along with his wife, Isha, and his stepdaughter, Lucy Lamy. While in Egypt he worked with Clement Robichon, architect and director of field work of the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology, and also with noted French Egyptologist Alexandre Varille. It took Schwaller de Lubicz and his team eight years to survey, photograph and produce drawings of Luxor Temple, a project he initially thought could be accomplished in six months.


No doubt it was his personal philosophy, influenced by his knowledge of alchemy, Pythagorean and Hermetic doctrine, and his own theories on the “symbolique” that inspired him to envision Luxor Temple as a blueprint of the “cosmic man.” Many Egyptophiles have at least seen - if not actually read - Schwaller de Lubicz’s slender volume The Temple of Man (first published in France as Le Temple dans l’Homme in 1949), with its illustrations showing the floor plan of Luxor Temple over which is superimposed a human skeleton. It was this early work that grew into the present edition of his hugely expanded thesis published in 1957 as Le Temple de l’Homme. Full title of this new English version is The Temple of Man: Apet of the South Sanctuary.




The thesis of the massive study may be summed up as follows:

Luxor Temple incorporates the proportions of the divine man in its layout and decoration, thereby serving as a “symbolique anthropocosmos.” That the temple has these human proportions is important because: “Man conceived by the Creator is Universe. On his body, senses, organs, assimilative functions, and vital nervous centers, both physical and occult, all knowledge is inscribed.”
Of course, the biggest drawback to this idea is that this particular temple was constructed by different kings in different dynasties, with the initial (back) part of the building being raised by Amenhotep III and the remainder (forecourt) added by Rameses II several generations later (with subsequent kings making contributions as well). If the “finished” temple represents the cosmic man, this presupposes a foreordained master plan that was necessarily followed by all the kings who worked on the structure over time.


The Temple of Man requires two huge volumes, each with over 500 pages to establish this doctrine and analyze the temple from its entrance to the rearmost sanctuaries, pointing out the correspondences between the “cosmic man” and the layout and decoration of the structure. In short, Schwaller de Lubicz argued that if one superimposed a figure of a standing man over the blueprint of the temple, that which is on the walls at any given point would symbolically relate to that corresponding part of the human body.


If Schwaller de Lubicz spent fifteen years in Luxor figuring this all out, it should come as no surprise that it may take the uninitiated reader quite a lot of time to work through the material in this massive study. Here are the main themes awaiting the intrepid pilgrim: The Doctrine of Anthropocosmos, Foundations of Pharaonic Mathematics and Calculations, Pharaonic Trigonometry, Living Architecture of Number, The Cosmic Principle of Volume, Pharaonic Cubits, The Human Canon, The Royal Apron, The Axes, The Architecture of the Temple, The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus, The Diadem, The Joints, The Head, The Zodiac, The Mystic Temple. And those are just the chapter titles of Volume I!




Volume II has more supporting textual material and 101 plates.

The Temple of Man, though more esoteric philosophy than Egyptology, to be sure, with its superb design and splendid illustrations, is an impressive, beautifully realized presentation of a highly controversial thesis. At its very worst it is only R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz forcing Luxor Temple to fit into his personal master plan and “philosophical” interpretations. But the very fact that the man spent fifteen years intensely studying this one monument to come up with the conclusions he did deserves consideration, discussion and debate.


It is hoped that fully respected Egyptological scholars who themselves have studied Luxor Temple in great detail - and I’m thinking in particular of Lanny Bell and Ray Johnson - will take a serious look at The Temple of Man and respond to Schwaller de Lubicz’s special interpretation of the structure’s layout and decoration. It would likewise be interesting to get a scholarly reaction from someone like Gay Robins to his ideas on the mathematics of proportion and how such relates to the ancient Egyptians’ depiction of the human form. It is The Temple of Man, after all, which is the bible of such “New Age” popularizers as John Anthony West (Serpent in the Sky) and Graham Hancock (Fingerprints of the Gods), and silence from academia only emboldens them to advance their personal reinterpretations of Schwaller de Lubicz’s ideas.

For those of you with interest in alternative approaches to ancient Egypt, The Temple of Man will be an important - if expensive - addition to your library.

Greg Reeder
 


 

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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2007, 09:23:08 pm »








The Temple of Man



by R. A. Schwaller de Lubicz

Original French text translated to English by Debra and Robert Lawlor

Published by Inner Traditions International, 1998 





Review by Dr. Colette M. Dowell  © 1998



I wonder what drives personal passion so rigorously that one’s lifetime is spent pursuing it. Is it the ultimate goal of resolution and the final achievement of understanding that surpasses any other desire ? Or what ?

                    Schwaller de Lubicz spent his entire lifetime pursuing his deep passion of figuring and comprehending the link between so-called cosmic realms and terrestrial nature including alchemy, physics, mathematics, geometry, art, astronomy, and, among his favorites, symbolism. He spent over fifteen years engaged in his studies of Ancient Egyptian Anthropocosmos Man and his temples. His work, The Temple of Man, reflects such skill and determination of comprehending Pharaonic Consciousness, it exceeds far beyond any other works of disciplined study along these lines I have ever encountered. The voluminous material in The Temple of Man is delivered with the great detail and gifted clarity for which Schwaller was so adept. Schwaller, however, did not achieve this great work of art by himself. Lucie Lamy, his stepdaughter and most indispensable lifelong collaborator, kept many research notes and drafted the graphics and illustrations. Deborah and Robert Lawlor demonstrated pure love in their translation of Schwaller's French text into English, (which must have been an incredible task). And Inner Traditions deserves applause for producing such a fine piece of art in book form. For the seekers of higher realms of consciousness and that of Ancient Egyptology, I know of no other book that contains so many variants of thought and data composing and revealing such a highly advanced way of thinking. The Temple of Man is a degree of education one would acquire after lifetimes of lessons.

          I was positively astonished and overjoyed when I received the two volumes of The Temple of Man. The exceptional beauty in which they were bound was beholding to my eyes. The quality of graphics, illustrations and early historical photography of both the geographical nature and portraits of temples are themselves keepsakes alone. Schwaller's eloquent and scholarly way of dissecting mathematically-oriented spiritual philosophy and physics is masterful. Ancient Egyptian's Pharaonic concept of Man as the center of the Universe in physical expression as Anthropocosmos Man was not totally new to me, but the rich understanding I received from reading Schwaller's work was certainly new. When we read a few books on sacred geometry and a few books about spiritual values and divine principles, "we" (I am not speaking for all of us) tend to think we intellectually and spiritually understand our placement in the universe. I suspect, though, that we can't possibly grasp sacred geometry and divine principles until we dig to their roots and go through the deliberate deliverance of concepts and lessons that have been so deeply sculpted in the Ancient Egyptian architecture and hieroglyphics. I also suspect that we truly need to know and understand these lessons, for that is why they were given.

          We have a tendency to view a mural or bas-relief of a man leading cows with nets and birds as just possibly a legend of how Egyptian people might have farmed; but particular hieroglyphic and "hieratic" writing is so much more than that. It reveals in its SYMBOLIQUE, tutorial lessons in both scientific and spiritual esoteric realms. These laws and lessons reflect knowledge of spirit manifesting into matter and the harmonic growth and relationship between the two. This lost wisdom, in a sense, is a form of physics. In modern terms we would label such equivocal philosophy as quantum physics and even holographic physics. "Pharaonic mentality rejected metaphysical and rational thought. The hieroglyphic form of writing makes the syllogistic system of such a rational science impossible. Pharaonic mathematics confirms this attitude."..."Duality within Unity, the incomprehensible truth of the Trinity." ("VOLUME and CONSCIOUSNESS")

          Believing, learning and knowing are the three gates of entry into the Temple. The Temples are encoded with practical, physical and spiritual lessons. To the Anthropocosmos Man, the Universe is a projection of human consciousness. Consciousness is volume. The architecture in the Temples expresses volume in form. The Anthropocosmos Man interprets conscious gestation as volume and form and depicts various stages of gestation as particular proportions contained within a sphere. Proportionality creating form and rhythms in our daily life are functions known as neters in Egyptian language. An example of natural form and rhythm is the cycle of our hours based upon days, upon the revolution of the Earth, upon the lunar, around the equinoxes, around the solar calendar and so on. Neters have different implied esoteric terms pertaining to their functions, mathematical equations and geometric laws. The Pharaohs appointed distinct symbols and developed many items of measure befitting these neters, some of which are known as fathoms, cubits and canons. Architects enveloped the Temples with such engineering and design that when the entire complex or even just fragments of itself was viewed as a model, monumental points such as foundations, joints, bas-reliefs, transparencies, murals and hieroglyphics contained the philosophy and teachings of the Ancient Pharaohs. Anthropocosmos Man views himself as true physical expression of the genesis of functions and believes Man to be the center of the Universe.

          Anthropocosmos Man had configured the vital moment of Genesis in mathematical terms and was able to express this creation by way of geometry propagating into greater proportions. They had realized the square roots of 2, 3, and 5, and the perpetual golden mean ratio "phi" associated with pentagonal and hexagonal geometry expressed in the physical development of organic creatures in relationship to the growth and size of their different body parts. The Temple of Luxor is architecturally rendered to exhibit within its design the same proportions as the proportions of Man, thus also exhibiting the mathematical and geometrical structure of the Cosmos and its locale within human consciousness. Pharaonic Consciousness not only recognized Man as the center of the Universe but was also able to formally equate it as well. In The Temple of Man, Schwaller addresses the famous Mathematical Rhind Papyrus's content and dissects it revealing their knowledge of mathematical and geometrical laws and functions.

          Music to the ears engages the Universe. This Pharaonic conception divides vibrations into proportioned intervals known as tones. These tones coagulate and multiply into spherical volume resulting in resonant harmonics and unity of chords creating form, beauty and consciousness. The inner ear was therefore recognized as one of the main keys utilized to enter the gates of wisdom and knowledge. This natural form of creation is everywhere at all moments and has self-cognition. This innate knowledge is carried throughout all vibrations and travels everywhere through multiple harmonic passages creating, in effect, geometric structure and form. Therefore, in simple terms, Cosmic Man's interpretation of consciousness is vibrational volume expanding from the center of a sphere proportioned harmonically and containing innate knowledge.

          Anthropocosmos Man, relating consciousness to volume and volume as spheres, and perceiving that our entire Universe functions under these principles, deduced that our solar system consisted of consistent terms of proportionality, and geometric structure. Their knowledge of the gearing system of our Universe was expressed through their Temples and measuring devices. The extent of accuracy associated with astronomical events and celestial time is uncanny. The geodetic Temples are also "consciously" oriented. Different aspects of the Pharaonic philosophy were encoded throughout their entire complexes-absolutely incredible. And here is this man in recent modern times, Schwaller de Lubicz, to come around and measure everything and read the hieroglyphics and figure out what they were communicating. We can now further understand the concepts and sciences of this historical advanced civilization. What a really far out thing to do.

          Throughout The Temple of Man, you will find various passages of remarkable studies. Something very interesting to me was the bit about the Scarab. The Scarab is a beetle who is self-reproducing and "rolls" its home for a nest to re-create in. This union of singular duality expresses creation as a third sector for trinity. This in symbolique is consciousness. The human skull contains many bones that are bound together by sutural membranes. The top cross-section of the skull, viewed from the top, looks curiously suggestive of the back mantle of the Scarab beetle. This uppermost part of the skull, the crown, in both its physical characteristics and in its symbolic form pertains to consciousness. The Ancient Egyptians understood the functions of the human brain and depicted this in their choice of the Scarab insect as a symbol for representing a specific function, or neter, and their specific form of architecture. In architectural proportion, various rooms in the temples have specific monumental points referring to different functions, which have been located at precise points in the human body as well as the skull. The Temple of Man contains excerpts from the Smith Medical Papyrus of the Ancient Egyptians. This Papyrus is filled with case studies and intellectual dialogues of diagnoses and is at least indicative of the minimum degree of medical knowledge the Ancients had acquired.

          After reading, re-reading and equating Schwaller's work, I realized how hard it must have been for Schwaller to pursue this knowledge. A person is either highly gifted or must have a passion which drives them so deep inside that they live their whole soul experience in search of resolution. There would be no greater honor or joy for Schwaller, besides already understanding what he knows, than for him to know that his work is being read, held in high regard and praised for the quality of passion and scope of discipline necessary to pursue and gain such insight into an ancient and forgotten past. The Temple of Man is a cocoon for me to grow through, to metamorphose into a more fully enhanced individual with enlarged capacity for conscious, spiritual and cosmic realms, as well as geometrical and mathematical laws. I finally conclude that if the entirety of our modern civilization knew and practiced the principles of the Anthropocosmos Man, our world would probably be a much more positive place to dwell. We would indeed be in touch with our God we all search for. This God as Spiritual, Natural, Mathematical and Geometric Laws are to all of Life.

          Many thanks to Schwaller de Lubicz for his gargantuan endeavor and again to all those in this world who helped make this work a masterful piece of art. My life will be forever changed.



Dr. Colette M. Dowell
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Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
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