Atlantis Online
July 11, 2020, 04:04:33 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Giant crater may lie under Antarctic ice
http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn9268
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

A Journey in Southern Siberia

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: A Journey in Southern Siberia  (Read 251 times)
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2010, 11:24:15 am »

and their burial rites. It then deals with the origin of the shamans or priests, with the sacred trees and groves, and with the gods of the Buriats. The myths connected with the Mongol religion are next recorded, just as Curtin heard them from the lips of living Buriats. A collection of folk-tales completes the volume. It is a book of very unusual character, which only an extraordinary linguist and scholar could have written, so difficult was the gathering of the material for it. The journey itself was one of considerable hardship and exposure; and the linguistic, historical, and anthropological knowledge required to produce the book has seldom, if ever before, been possessed by any single scholar.
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2010, 11:24:22 am »

The manuscript of this volume was finished a few months before Curtin's death, but it has been published posthumously without the advantage of his revision.

CHARLES W. ELIOT.

OCTOBER 20, 1909.

 

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2010, 11:24:49 am »

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


p. ix

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I
 PAGE
 
The Mongols.—Description of Lake Baikal.—Mongol conquests.—The British in India.—Sketch of the history of Siberia.—Southern Siberia first visited by Russian princes.—Ivan the Great divides Yugria (Siberia).—Stróganoff builds trading posts on the Toból River.—Yermak, the national hero of Siberia.—Prince Bolhovski, first government official sent to Siberia.—Death of Yermak.—Founding of Tiumen and Tobólsk.—Founding of Pelym, the first place to which exiles were sent.—The exile of a church bell.—Ivan and Vassili Románoff, brothers of the founder of the Románoff dynasty, the first exiles of distinction sent to Siberia.—Discovery of the Yákuts.—Russians meet the Buriats.—Founding of Irkutsk.—Buriats become Russian subjects
 1
 

CHAPTER II
 
 
My journey to the Buriats.—Description of Irkutsk and the Angara River.—Exorbitant prices.—Preparations for a journey.—A Siberian exile.—A race up hill.—Post stations.—A harelipped driver.—Buriat dogs.—Arrival at Andrei Mihailovitch's.—Death of Mihailoff's son.—Arrival at Usturdi.—Donkeys of Assuan.—Mongol horses.—Lazareff, the cross-eyed widower.—Mongol wedding
 13
 

CHAPTER III
 
 
A walk and talk with Andrei Mihailovitch.—The mission church.—Search for "wise men."—Taking down myths.—Appearance of Manshut, a man wise in ancient lore.—Arrival of convicts from Russia.—A visit to Andrei Mihailovitch's summer home.—Photographing Ongons (gods).—Preparation for Horse Sacrifice
 38
 

CHAPTER IV
 
 
The Horse Sacrifice.—Multiplication of food and drink.—Prayer to the gods.—Buriat religion.—Difficulties of introducing a new religion.—Preparations for a journey to the sacred island of Olkhon
 44
 
p. x
 
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2010, 11:25:03 am »


CHAPTER V
 PAGE
 
Annoying delays.—A wedding.—Russian influence.—Journey to Olzoni.—Palisaded prison.—Tembovski, a Polish exile.—Visit to the Alexandroffs.—A night journey.—Difficulties encountered at post stations.—Count Murevieff Amoorski.—"Shamaning" to drive away sickness.—Crossing Lake Baikal.—The "Watchers."—Muravieff and the elder of Nur.—Arrival at Seven Pines.—Lodging in a church
 53
 

CHAPTER VI
 
 
A search for old men who know Mongol folk-lore.—Forced to move out of the church.—Lack of food.—Leave Olkhon.—"Ragatz" station.—An Italian blacksmith.—Buriat food.—Picturesque dress of Russian women.—Climate of Siberia.—A Russian exile and his family.—Taking down myths.—Siberian fruit.—Baiandai, a village of ex-convicts.—An exile from Little Russia.—My servant, a murderer.—Soldiers ordered to China.—Arkokoff and his surroundings.—A night-watch who had served out a sentence for murder.—Disorder and dirt.—Difficulties encountered.—Wild flowers of Siberia.—Kongoroff exhibits his gods.—A battle with cockroaches.—An inhuman driver.—A German exile.—Return to Usturdi
 73
 

CHAPTER VII
 
 
A birthday in Siberia.—Search for Manshut.—The Red-nosed exile.—"Red-nose" finds Manshut.—Night ride to Usturdi.—The dissipation of young girls.—Leave Usturdi.—Iyok, a town of ex-convicts.—A night in Kudá (Where).—An ignorant official.—Arrival at Irkutsk
 87
 

CHAPTER VIII
 
 
Customs of the Buriats.—Making of tarasun.—Marriage ceremonies.—Ceremonies after the birth of a child.—Buriat Ongons, gods.—Sickness.—Rites attending the Burning of the Dead.—Buriat Burial of the Dead
 
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2010, 11:25:16 am »

CHAPTER IX
 
 
Origin of Shamans.—A Shaman story.—Second sight.—Sacred groves of the Shamans.—Sacred groves of the Burkans.—Sacred trees and groves
 105
 

CHAPTER X
 
 
The gods of the Buriats.—House Ongons (gods).—Outside Ongons.—Field Ongons.—The Creation.—Esege Malan.—Gesir Bogdo.—Esege Malan and Mother Earth
 118
 
p. xi
 
 

CHAPTER XI
 PAGE
 
Myths connected with Mongol Religion.—Gesir Bogdo, Nos. I, II, III.—The Iron Hero.—Ashir Bogdo
 127
 

CHAPTER XII
 
 
Mongol Myths and Folk-lore.—Buruldai Bogdo Khan, Nos. I, II.—Sharau.—Húnkuvai and the Horse with Round Head.—Varhan Tulai Hubun.—Altin Shagoy.—Yerente Khan and his son Sokto.—Alamaldjin and his twin sister.—The Twin Boys, Altin Shagoy and Mungun Shagoy
 186
 

 



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2010, 11:25:29 am »

p. xiii

ILLUSTRATIONS
Portrait of the Author
 Frontispiece
 
FACING
 PAGE
 
Irkutsk, Siberia
 18
 
Post Station at Elantsin
 24
 
Our Traveling Carriage while Making the Buriat Journey
 24
 
Baggage and Provisions of Convicts
 40
 
Convicts Passing through the Village of Usturdi
 40
 
Group of Convicts Resting and Lunching
 42
 
Buriat Wedding
 42
 
People Assembled for the Horse Sacrifice
 46
 
Stone Altars on the Hill of Sacrifice
 48
 
  I. Horse Sacrifice
 50
 
 II. Horse Sacrifice
 50
 
III. Horse Sacrifice
 52
 
 IV. Horse Sacrifice
 52
 
  V. Horse Sacrifice
 54
 
 VI. Horse Sacrifice
 54
 
Convict Prison at a Post Station
 68
 
Buriat Women in Full Dress
 68
 
House where we Boarded on Olkhon Island
 72
 
The Only Russian Church in Olkhon
 72
 
Arkokoff, his Wife, Son, and Son's Wife
 80
 
Lazareff and his Relatives
 80
 
Kongoroff and his Wife
 84
 
Andrei Mihailovitch, Mikiloff and his Young Wife
 84
 
Manshut
 88
 
p. xiv
 
 
FACING
 PAGE
 
Buriat Young Lady, Island of Olkhon
 88
 
Ram, Sacrificed as an Offering
 100
 
Bones of the Ram, Left to Rot and Fall
 100
 
Tea from China, Coming from Kiakhta to the Railroad in Irkutsk
 106
 
Buriat Watch Dog
 106
 
Andrei Mihailovitch's Field Ongons
 120
 
Field Ongons
 124
 
Field Ongons, Church in which the Author Spent Three Days, and Group of Houses and Russian Store Mentioned on Page 72
 128
 
Vassya, his Father, and the Author
 142
 
Drying Fuel—Cow Droppings—Island of Olkhon
 158
 
Church near a Post Station on the Road to Lake Baikal
 158
 
Our Buriat Friends in the Sacred Island of Olkhon
 176
 
Russian Exile and Two Buriat Shamans
 194
 
The Author's Carriage
 194
 
Village of Alaguersk-rod in Siberia
 214
 
A Group of Unmarried Mongol Women or Young Ladies in Usturdi
 214
 
Gods which Guard the House from the Outside, Olkhon Island
 236
 
Buriat Gods, or Representations of their Gods
 236
 
Buriat Household Gods
 258
 
Contents of "God Bags"
 258
 
Buriats—Husband and Wife in the Hayfield
 282
 
Representations of Buriat Gods
 282
 

 

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2010, 11:26:00 am »



Map of Siberia (289 Kb)
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2010, 11:26:25 am »



Map Detail: Lake Baikal and environs (66 Kb)
Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2010, 11:26:43 am »

p. 1

A JOURNEY IN SOUTHERN SIBERIA
CHAPTER I
THE BIRTHPLACE OF MONGOL ACTIVITY
THE Buriats whose myth-tales I have collected, and whose beliefs, modes of worship, and customs I have studied at their source and describe in this volume, are Mongols in the strictest sense of the word as men use it. They inhabit three sides of Lake Baikal, as well as Olkhon its only island. The place and the people are noteworthy.

Lake Baikal is the largest body of fresh water in the Old World, being over four hundred miles long and from twenty-four to fifty-six miles broad, its total area covering about thirteen thousand square miles. The Buriats living west of that water, and those inhabiting the sacred island of Olkhon, are the only Mongols who have preserved their own race religion with its primitive usages, archaic beliefs, and philosophy, hence they are a people of great interest to science.

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2010, 11:26:53 am »

The region about that immense body of water, Lake Baikal, is of still greater interest in history, for from the mountain land south of the lake, and touching it, came Temudjin, known later as Jinghis Khan, and Tamerlane, or Timur Lenk (the Iron Limper), the two greatest personages in the Mongol division of mankind.

From the first of these two mighty man-slayers were descended the Mongol subduers of China and Russia. Among Jinghis Khan's many grandsons were Kublai Khan, the subjector of China, together with Burma and other lands east of India; Hulagu, who destroyed the Assassin Commonwealth of Persia, stormed Bagdad, and extinguished the Abbasid Kalifat; and Batu, who covered Russia with blood and ashes, mined Hungary, hunting its king to an island in the Adriatic, crushed

p. 2

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2010, 11:27:05 am »

German and other forces opposed to the Mongols at Liegnitz, and returned to the Volga region, where he established his chief headquarters.

Descendants of Jinghis Khan ruled in Russia for two centuries and almost five decades. In China they wielded power only sixty-eight years.

From Tamerlane, a more brilliant, if not a greater, leader than Jinghis, descended the Mongols of India, whose history is remarkable both in the rise and the fall of the empire which they founded.

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2010, 11:27:14 am »

These two Mongol conquerors had a common ancestor in Jinghis Khan's great-great-grandfather, Tumbinai; hence both men were of the same blood and had the same land of origin,—the region south of Lake Baikal.

That Mongol power which began its career near Baikal covered all Asia, or most of it, and a large part of Europe, and lasted till destroyed by Russia and England. The histories of these struggles are world-wide in their meaning; they deserve the closest study, and in time will surely receive it.

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2010, 11:27:24 am »

When the descendants of Jinghis Khan had lost China, the only great conquest left them was Russia, and there, after a rule of two hundred and forty-four years, power was snatched from them.

The Grand Moguls, those masters of India, the descendants of Tamerlane, met with Great Britain, and were stripped of their empire in consequence.

Report Spam   Logged
Rachel Dearth
Administrator
Superhero Member
*****
Posts: 4460



« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2010, 11:27:42 am »

The British conquest of India and its methods mark a new era in history,—the era of commercial invasion, the era of the "drummer" in politics; that drummer who, in addition to the wares which he offers, has statecraft behind him, and when the need comes he has also cold steel and hot cannon-balls.

The Grand Mogul and his counsellors could not suspect danger from this man. They considered him, at first, much as rich ladies in great country houses far from cities might consider a humble and toiling pack-peddler. But, though he might seem insignificant, this man was really a conqueror. The Grand Mogul, Jehargir, could not see, of course, that Hawkins and Roe would bring after them servants such as Clive, Warren

p. 3

http://sacred-texts.com/asia/jss/jss05.htm
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy