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Joy Division

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Krysta Ludeking
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« Reply #30 on: July 19, 2009, 11:05:18 pm »

Joy Division - Wilderness

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Krysta Ludeking
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« Reply #31 on: July 19, 2009, 11:06:13 pm »

Joy Division - Atmosphere 1988 [Ian Curtis]

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Krysta Ludeking
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« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2009, 01:23:17 am »

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Krysta Ludeking
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« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2009, 01:24:21 am »

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Krysta Ludeking
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« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2009, 01:26:43 am »

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Therion
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« Reply #35 on: July 26, 2009, 02:53:26 am »

Martin Hannett

Martin Hannett (former North Manchester, Lancashire, England[1] 31 May 1948[2][3] – 18 April 1991), sometimes credited as Martin Zero, was a record producer who helped develop Joy Division and was an original partner in Factory Records with Tony Wilson. Hannett's trademark sound, most apparent on Joy Division's debut album Unknown Pleasures and its follow-up, Closer, is sparse and eerie, complementing frontman Ian Curtis' baritone vocals.
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Therion
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« Reply #36 on: July 26, 2009, 02:55:02 am »

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Therion
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« Reply #37 on: July 26, 2009, 02:56:25 am »

Martin Hannett
Also known as    Zero, Martin "Zero" Hannett
Born    31 May 1948(1948-05-31)
Origin    Former North Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
Died    18 April 1991 (aged 42)
Genre(s)    New Wave, Post-Punk
Occupation(s)    musician, record producer
Instrument(s)    bass guitar, guitar, keyboards
Years active    1976 – 1991
Label(s)    Rabid, Factory, Virgin
Associated acts    Paul Young, John Cooper Clarke, The Invisible Girls, Pauline Murray, Nico
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Therion
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« Reply #38 on: July 26, 2009, 02:56:52 am »

He was raised in a working class Catholic[4] family in Miles Platting, Manchester,[5] attending Corpus Christi school, in Grim City,[6] and Xaverian College, in the centre of Manchester, near Rusholme. In 1967,[7] he began to attend UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology), where he earned a degree in chemistry, but chose not to pursue that profession.[4]
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Therion
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« Reply #39 on: July 26, 2009, 02:57:03 am »

After he graduated, he began to learn to play bass.[8] He was bassist with Spiderman King[9] and as member in a band called Paradox, in 1973, alongside Paul Young, later of Sad Café and Mike + The Mechanics.[10][11]

His production work began with the cartoon show All Kinds of Heroes soundtrack, which also was produced by Steve Hopkins (with whom later worked again). By the time, he also began to mix at pub gigs. Another early production works included Greasy Bear material, Belt & Braces Road Show Band's eponymous album, in 1975, and five songs from Pete Farrow's repertoire, later included on that artist's compilation album Who Says There's No Beach in Stockport, in 1977. However, he first came to musical attention the latter year, when, as Martin Zero, he produced the first independent punk record, the Buzzcocks Spiral Scratch EP. Under the same moniker he produced early records by punk poet John Cooper Clarke, whose Salford monotone was complemented by drum machines, simple synthesiser motifs and Hannett's own bass playing. As Martin Zero, Hannett appeared on Top of the Pops playing bass on Jilted John's eponymous single, which he also produced.
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Therion
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« Reply #40 on: July 26, 2009, 02:57:18 am »

Hannett became most closely associated with Joy Division. Hannett's meticulous production, heavily influenced by dub, created a space at the heart of Joy Division's sound, pitting the band's spartan, jagged instrumentation against a spacey void, the latter being created by adept studio manipulation. For these purposes, Hannett often utilized looping technology to treat musical notes with an array of digital filters and both Melos analogue and digital and AMS digital delay units. Hannett would use effects from both ends of the price spectrum to get his reverb and echo effects since the AMS delay was much more expensive and complicated than the Melos analogue tape and bucket brigade devices. His techniques are especially prominent in regard to the band's drum and synth sounds, which use the echo and digital reverb effects, the notes echoing and reverberating through a spare sonic backdrop.The first synths Hannett and Sumner both used were Transcendent 2000s and then ARP Omnis. Also evident from his dub influences was the mixing of the bass (treated with a Clone Theory pedal provided by Peter Hook) and drums higher in the mix than usual, and placing the other instruments further back. The unusual effect which can be heard in the background of the track "Atmosphere" is supposedly Sumner stroking a set of chimes and fed through a microphone into a couple of Hannett's AMS delays.Hannett also liked to feed sounds through his Marshall Time Modulators,he had two of these and Strawberry Studios owned a third which he used.
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Therion
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« Reply #41 on: July 26, 2009, 02:57:38 am »

As a producer, Hannett obsessed over drum sounds, never being content until they completely coincided with the sounds in his head. Legend has it that he once forced Joy Division drummer Stephen Morris to take apart his drum kit during a recording session and reassemble it to include additional parts from a toilet. He also reputedly had Morris set up his kit on a first floor flat roof outside the fire escape at Cargo Recording Studios, Rochdale. The studio was used for the recording of Digital, Glass, Atmosphere and Ice Age. Hannett's unorthodox production methods resulted in drum sounds mixed with synthesisers that were both complex and highly distinctive. One can hear these distinctive drum and synth sounds on many Joy Division recordings. According to Hannett: "There was a lot of space in their sound. They were a gift to a producer, because they didn't have a clue. They didn't argue. A Factory Sample was the first thing I did with them. I think I'd had the new AMS delay line for about two weeks. It was called 'Digital'. It was heaven sent."[12]. Hannett was instrumental in the early development of these particular AMS delays asking the engineers in the AMS company to try and recreate within the electronics the sounds he was hearing in his head.
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Therion
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« Reply #42 on: July 26, 2009, 02:58:03 am »

Hannett's production can also be heard on Basement 5's album 1965 - 1980. Like many British bands of their time (e.g., The Clash), Basement 5 had a harsh, punk attitude borne out in their dystopian lyrics referencing the perceived injustices (e.g., those concerning the council estate youth of the late 1970s and early 1980s) of the early Thatcher era. However, musically, they draw from a slightly wider palette than many of their punk peers, utilizing a variety of Caribbean influences, particularly reggae. With the help of Hannett, they blended such traditional styles with tuneful, contemporary synth-pop, yielding a sound that balances the rustic and the futuristic, in much the same way that Joy Division managed to meld primal, Kinks-ian riffing with a menagerie of studio effects and manipulation. Hannett remixed some of the tracks from 1965-1980 for In Dub, which features dub versions of Basement 5's material.
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« Reply #43 on: July 26, 2009, 02:58:13 am »

In 1981, Hannett was name checked by the Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra on their track "Nazi Punks **** Off!," which appears on the In God We Trust, Inc. EP. Biafra introduces the track by saying, "This is '**** Off', overproduced by Martin Hannett, take four." The comment was tongue-in-cheek; Hannett never produced for the Dead Kennedys. A similar quote precedes the song "**** Me" by "Mihi" as appears on "Regret", the first volume of the I've Girls Compilations.
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Therion
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« Reply #44 on: July 26, 2009, 02:58:36 am »

Hannett worked briefly with U2, New Order, and Factory Records band Stockholm Monsters. A rift formed with Factory and he sued them in 1982 over a financial dispute; the matter was eventually settled out of court. At this point, Hannett's career had spiralled into decline due to his heavy drinking and drug use, especially his use of heroin. His weight eventually doubled (to roughly 26 stone, or 364 pounds), and he died of heart failure in 1991 at the age of 42 in Chorley, Lancashire. Hannett is survived by a wife, daughter and a son.
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