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Joy Division

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Therion
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« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2009, 02:58:48 am »

Hannett was portrayed by actor Andy Serkis in the 2002 film 24 Hour Party People, which was based on Tony Wilson's career as the co-founder of Factory Records and The Haçienda nightclub. In the DVD commentary, Wilson notes a review that described Hannett as Serkis's "strangest role," and points out that Serkis is best known for his portrayal of Gollum in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy. Wilson concludes that the reviewer's implication is correct, that indeed, Hannett was far stranger than Gollum. Hannett was portrayed by Ben Naylor in Anton Corbijn's film Control.
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Therion
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« Reply #46 on: July 26, 2009, 02:59:06 am »

Albums produced

    * Belt & Braces Road Show Band, Belt & Braces Road Show Band 1975
    * Pete Farrow, Who Says There's No Beach In Stockport? 1977 issued on cd by Ozit Morpheus
    * John Cooper Clarke, Disguise in Love 1978
    * The Durutti Column, The Return of the Durutti Column 1979
    * Joy Division, Unknown Pleasures 1979
    * Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls, Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls 1979
    * Basement 5,1965-1980 1980
    * John Cooper Clarke, Snap, Crackle & Bop 1980
    * Joy Division, Closer 1980
    * Magazine, The Correct Use of Soap 1980
    * The Psychedelic Furs, The Psychedelic Furs 1980 (songs "Susan's Strange" and "Soap Commercial")
    * A Certain Ratio, To Each... 1981
    * Joy Division, Still 1981
    * Magazine, Magic, Murder & the Weather (mixed) 1981
    * New Order, Movement 1981
    * Section 25, Always Now 1981
    * John Cooper Clarke, Zip Style Method 1982
    * Armande Altaï, Nocturne Flamboyant 1983
    * Blue in Heaven, All The Gods Men 1985
    * The Stone Roses, Garage Flower 1985
    * Walk in the Walk, Walk the Walk 1987
    * Happy Mondays, Bummed 1988
    * The High, Somewhere Soon 1990
    * Joy Division Martin Hannett's Personal Mixes2007 - now officially owned by Joy Division
    * Joy Division In the studio with Martin Hannett2008 - now officially owned by Joy Division
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Therion
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« Reply #47 on: July 26, 2009, 02:59:36 am »

Singles produced

    * Buzzcocks, Spiral Scratch 1976 as Martin Zero
    * Jilted John, "Jilted John" 1978
    * OMD, "Electricity" 1979 as Martin Zero
    * Kevin Hewick, "Haystack" 1980
    * U2, "11 O'Clock Tick Tock" 1980
    * Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls, Mr X 1980
    * Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls, Searching For Heaven 1981
    * Crispy Ambulance, "Live on a Hot August Night" 1981
    * ESG, "ESG" 1981
    * New Order, "Ceremony" 1981
    * New Order, "Everything's Gone Green" 1981
    * New Order, "Procession" 1981
    * Stockholm Monsters, "Fairy Tales" 1981
    * Kit, "Overshadowing Me" 1990
    * Kitchens of Distinction, "Quick as Rainbows" 1990
    * New Fast Automatic Daffodils, "Get Better" 1991
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Therion
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« Reply #48 on: July 26, 2009, 02:59:48 am »

Compilations

    * Martin: The Work of Record Producer Martin Hannett (Factory Records, 1991)
    * And Here is the Young Man (Debutante, 1998)
    * Zero: A Martin Hannett Story 1977-1991' (Big Beat, 2006)
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Therion
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« Reply #49 on: July 26, 2009, 02:59:55 am »

References

   1. ^ [1]
   2. ^ Simmonds, Jeremy. The Encyclopedia of Dead Rock Stars. Pag. 272, Chicago Review Press, 2008. ISBN 1-55652-754-3, 9781556527548
   3. ^ [2]
   4. ^ a b Interview (...) although we (he and John Cooper Clarke) both come from the Catholic working class in Manchester.
   5. ^ [3]
   6. ^ [4]
   7. ^ [5]
   8. ^ [6]
   9. ^ [7]
  10. ^ [8]
  11. ^ Simmonds, Jeremy. The Encyclopedia of Dead Rock Stars. Pag. 272, Chicago Review Press, 2008. ISBN 1556527543, 9781556527548
  12. ^ Savage, Jon, "Faster, but slower", Mojo, May 2006

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Therion
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« Reply #50 on: July 26, 2009, 03:00:49 am »

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Therion
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« Reply #51 on: July 26, 2009, 03:01:04 am »

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Therion
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« Reply #52 on: July 26, 2009, 03:01:53 am »

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Therion
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« Reply #53 on: July 26, 2009, 03:03:29 am »

Music of Manchester

The pop groups of the 1960s and early 1970s


Manchester had an impressive music scene before 1976, with groups like The Hollies, The Bee Gees, Herman's Hermits, Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders, Freddie and the Dreamers in the sixties and Barclay James Harvest and 10cc in the early to mid seventies, and with Top of the Pops being recorded by the BBC in the city. In 1965 Herman's Hermits outsold the Beatles , selling over 10 million records in seven months[citation needed]. Manchester bands Freddie and The Dreamers, Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders and Herman's Hermits topped the American Billboard charts consecutively between the middle of April 1965 and the end of May, with one week in 1965 where the three bands were numbers 1, 2 and 3 in the US Billboard top 100. With the exception of Graham Gouldman of 10cc and Eric Stewart of The Mindbenders (who built Strawberry studios in Stockport, Britain's first world class recording studio outside London) there was little reinvestment in Manchester from its successful sons and daughters.
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« Reply #54 on: July 26, 2009, 03:04:28 am »

The Sex Pistols at the Free Trade Hall; Punk Rock

On 4 June 1976, the Sex Pistols, at the invitation of Howard Devoto and Pete Shelley of Buzzcocks, played at the Lesser Free Trade Hall in Castlefield.[1] In an audience of less than 42 people, several key members of Manchester's future music scene were present: Tony Wilson Granada TV presenter and creator of Factory Records, Peter Hook, Bernard Sumner (of Joy Division & New Order), Morrissey - later to form The Smiths with Johnny Marr - producer Martin Hannett, and Mick Hucknall of Simply Red.
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Therion
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« Reply #55 on: July 26, 2009, 03:05:55 am »

Another influential event was the release of Buzzcocks' Spiral Scratch EP in early 1977 - the first independent-label punk record. In the wake of The Buzzcocks releasing the first truly independent record onto the Punk scene, the old movers and shakers from Manchester music collective, Music Force who included producer Martin Hannett, Tosh Ryan and Lawrence Beadle formed a local label called Rabid Records who started putting out singles by local acts like Slaughter & The Dogs(Rob Gretton later to manage Joy Division/New Order was their roadie/tour manager- all Wythenshawe lads), John Cooper Clarke and Ed Banger & The Nosebleeds(whose lineup included Vini Reilly) and licensed Jilted John by Jilted John to EMI records. This record company coincided with Tony Wilson bringing the cream of both American and British punk; New Wave bands to the public on his acclaimed late night Granada Television show So It Goes. This meant that Manchester had the Sex Pistols on the TV long before they were on LWT with Bill Grundy (incidentally another Mancunian).
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« Reply #56 on: July 26, 2009, 03:06:11 am »

Unlike other major cities Manchester had The Sex Pistols Anarchy tour play twice at The Electric Circus and it was these gigs more than the small Lesser Free Trade Hall gigs which really lit a fire under Manchester's assorted musicians and gave them that do-it-yourself philosophy which defined British punk. When So It Goes finished on Granada , Tony Wilson still wanted an involvement in the local music scene, so started a night up at the old Russell Club in Hulme called The Factory along with his friends (soon to be business partners) Alan Erasmus and Alan Wise. Tony had been taking a great interest in Rabid Records and its set up and after working on the research for a feature for Granada TV about Rabid, he along with Alan Erasmus and Joy Division Manager Rob Gretton (the Ideal for Living EP had been distributed by Rabid) decided they would do their own version of Rabid Records, but instead of churning out singles and then licensing the album deals to major labels (Slaughter & The Dogs' debut appeared on Decca, John Cooper Clarke was licensed to CBS, and Jilted John to EMI) they would concentrate on albums. The first album following the Factory sampler EP (which included Joy Division, Cabaret Voltaire, and Od) was Unknown Pleasures by Joy Division, recorded at Strawberry Studios in Stockport.
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« Reply #57 on: July 26, 2009, 03:06:23 am »

Factory Records

Taking the Industrial Revolution as its model, Factory Records played upon Manchester's traditions, invoking at once apparently incongruous images of the industrial north and the glamorous pop art world of Andy Warhol. While labelmates A Certain Ratio and The Durutti Column each forged their own sound, it was Factory's Joy Division who somehow managed to grimly define what exactly it was to be a Mancunian as the 70s drew to an end. At the same time, and out of the same post punk energy, emerged Mark E. Smith's groundbreaking group The Fall, who would become one of the most inventive, original and prolific groups of the next three decades. New Order rose from the ashes of Joy Division combining rock, pop, and dance music to earn much critical acclaim while selling millions of records. The group that would ultimately become the definitive Manchester group of the 80s was The Smiths, led by Morrissey and Marr. With songs like 'Rusholme Ruffians' and 'Suffer Little Children', Morrissey sang explicitly about Manchester, creating songs that are as iconic of Manchester as the paintings of L.S.Lowry.
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« Reply #58 on: July 26, 2009, 03:06:49 am »

'Madchester'

As the 80s drew to a close, a new energy arrived in Manchester, fuelled by the drug ecstasy. A new scene developed around The Haçienda night club (again part of the Factory Records ‘empire’), creating what would become known as the Madchester scene, – the main proponents being the Happy Mondays, The Inspiral Carpets, and The Stone Roses. The history of the Manchester music scene over this period was dramatised in Michael Winterbottom's 2002 film 24 Hour Party People.
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« Reply #59 on: July 26, 2009, 03:07:53 am »

The 1990s and after

After the "Madchester" period, Manchester music lost much of its provincial energy, though many successful and interesting acts were still to emerge. Other notable musical acts in Manchester have been Take That, 808 State, M People, Oasis, The Verve, Magazine, The Durutti Column, A Certain Ratio, James, Badly Drawn Boy, Chameleons, Charlatans, Simply Red, Cleopatra, Michael McGoldrick, Elbow, Monomania, I Am Kloot, Autechre, Lamb, Marconi Union, A Guy Called Gerald, Goldblade, Mr Scruff, Oceansize and Doves. Morrissey and The Fall still continue to garner critical acclaim while Oasis remain the most popular, having played to more than 1.7 million people worldwide during their Don't Believe the Truth tour of 2005 & early 2006.
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