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Te Pito Te Henua, Or Easter Island


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Author Topic: Te Pito Te Henua, Or Easter Island  (Read 1692 times)
Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #585 on: March 29, 2010, 01:13:19 pm »

The natives of Easter Island speak a dialect of the Malayo-Polynesian language, which is so widely spread in the South Sea and Malay Archipelago. Any one who will tike the trouble to compare the accompanying vocabulary with the same words used by the natives of New Zealand, Tahiti, Rorotonga, Samoa, and any of the islands of Polynesia, will see that many of the words are identically the same, and others show a slight variation.

Not only do the words resemble those spoken throughout the South Sea, but all the dialects possess, in common, the

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #586 on: March 29, 2010, 01:13:27 pm »

peculiarity of having a dual number of the personal pronouns in addition to the singular and plural. For example, he or she is, "Ko-ia," in the Maori it is, "ia;" they two, on this island is "rana-â," in the Maori, it is "rana;" they, in this dialect is "pouro," in the Maori, it is "ratou." Words are frequently reduplicated to denote the plural of collectives in nouns, the comparative, or superlative degree in adjectives, and repeated action in verbs. "Iti" signifies, little, "iti-iti," expresses very
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #587 on: March 29, 2010, 01:13:40 pm »

little, and the word for small child is "poki iti-iti." Food, or to eat, is "Kai," to eat much or heartily is expressed by "kai-kai." The names of several of the colors are usually duplicated, as red, "mea-mea;" black, "uri-uri;" white "tea-tea;" vermillion "ura-ura."
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #588 on: March 29, 2010, 01:13:50 pm »

An interesting feature of the language is the native name for pig, "Oru," which differs from the corresponding term in all of the other Polynesian dialects. It is probably derived from the grunting sound made by the animal. In nearly all of the kindred dialects the name for pig is "puaka," a word which is also applied by some of them to all quadrupeds except the rat. The Easter Islanders have given this name to cattle, calling a cow "puaka tamahine" (female, puaka), and
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #589 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:02 pm »

a bull "puaka tamaroa" (male puaka). This tends to show that although pigs had probably been introduced on the islands from which the ancestors of the present inhabitants came, they took none with them in their migration, and only preserved the word puaka in a vague sense, as signifying a large animal with four legs. When cattle were introduced, they consequently applied the term to them, and coined the new one afterwards.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #590 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:12 pm »

Fingers are called "manga-manga" and toes, "manga manga vae," or literally the fingers of the foot. "Kiri" means covering, and to express the wood shoe they say "Kiri vae," or covering, for the foot. "Ivi" is the name applied to both needle and bone, which probably indicates that the original needles were made of bone.

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #591 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:23 pm »

In the pronunciation of words of two syllables, the accent is on the first; in words of three syllables it is generally on the second, and in polysyllable words it is on the penultimate. Modern articles recently introduced on the island are called by their English names, or something that has a similar sound.

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #592 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:29 pm »

It is worthy of note that the word "Atua" is used to signify both god and devil.



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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #593 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:43 pm »

VOCABULARY.
Absent: Ngaro.
Adieu: Kamoi.
Air: Hangu.
Aid: Hanu.
All (whole) :Ananakê
Ancestor: Tapuna.
Artisan: Maori.
Autumn: Vaha-tonga.
Ax: Toki.
A or and: E.
Age: Mata hi.
Abdomen: Manava.
Ankle: Kari-kari vae.
Arms: Kaufa.
Arm: Rima.
Artery: Ua noho toto.
Ash-wood: Mari-kuru.
Ape-fish: Nohue.

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #594 on: March 29, 2010, 01:14:55 pm »

Arrow-root: Pia.
Bad: Rake-rake.
Bath: Hopu.
Battle (war): Tana.
Bay: Paconga.
Before: Vaha.
Below: Iraro.
Bird: Manu.
Bird (tropic): Makohe.
Bitter: Kava.
Black: Uri-uri.
Boat: Vaka Poe-poe.
Boy: Poki-tamaroa.
Branch: Manga miro.
Bring me: Kotomai.
Brother (younger): Hangu potu.
Brother (elder): Atariki.
Brown: Hiku vera.
Bury: Muraki.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #595 on: March 29, 2010, 01:15:06 pm »

Bull: Puaka tamaroa.
Bush: Miro taka-taka.
Button: Herreo.
Boar: Oru tamaroa.
Back: Tua iri.
Beard: Vere.
Bladder: Tana mimi.
Blood: Toto.
Bone: Iri.
Breath: Hangu.
Buttock: Eve taki-evê.
Bulrush: Naatu.
Boobies (birds): Kuia.
Basket: Kete.
Calm: Marie.
Canvas: Hecki keho.
Cannibal: Kai tangata.
Cat: Gooli.
Catch: Kato.
Caught: Roa â.
Care: Ana.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #596 on: March 29, 2010, 01:15:23 pm »

Chief: Honui.
Child: Poki iti-iti.
Clean: Maita Kia.
Climb: Kahiti.
Cloak: Nua.
Clothing: Hami.
Cloak: Ran-i tea-tea.
Club (short): Para.
Club (dancing): Ao.
Club (long): Ua.
Cocoanut: Niu.
Comb: Tapani.
Cooking place: Heumu.
Correct: Riva mao â.
Cow: Puaka tamahini.
Cure: Hakaora.
Cut: Hauva.
Cut-grass: Kaverimai.
Cape: Heihu.
Coat: Lukan.
Come here: Ohogimai.
Clay: Oone vai.
Cry: Tangi.
Cattle: Puaka.
Crab: Pikea.
Calf of leg: Reru.
Chest: Uma.
Chin: Kanae.
Clitoris: Matakao.
Copulate: Tuki-tuki.
Convolvulus: Tanoa.
Calabash: Hue.
Cockroaches: Nga rara.
Cemetery: Papekoo.
Check: Kukunne.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #597 on: March 29, 2010, 01:15:35 pm »

Dance: Hoko-hoko.
Darkness: Pouri.
Day: Raa.
Death: Mate.
Defeat: Kio.
Dew: Hau.
Diaper: Hami Kaufa.
Dirty: Go-o-onea.
Docile: Mangaro.
Dog: Paihenga.
Drink (water): Kaunu taa-vai.
Dry: Paka-paka.
Dry, v.: Haka paka-paka.
Dung: Tutai.
Dwell: Noho.
Devil: Atua.
Dish-cloth: Te maro.
Drinking-cup: Rapa-rapa.
Dead: Heniati.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #598 on: March 29, 2010, 01:15:45 pm »

Ear-ring: Taringa.
Earth: Ooue.
Eat (food): Kai.
Eat (heartily): Kai-kai.
Evening: Ata-ta.
Eel: Koiro.
Ear: Taringa.
Elbow: Turi rima.
Eye (or face): Mata.
Eye-brow: Hihi.
Eye-lash: Veke-veke.
Eye-lid: Tutu Mata.
Far: Konui.
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #599 on: March 29, 2010, 01:15:56 pm »

Feign: Haka kemo.
Female: Tamahini.
Fire: Ahi.

p. 549

Fish: Ika.
Fishing: Ika kato omai.
Fishing-line: Eaho.
Fish-hook: Herou.
Fish-snood: Ekave.
Flea: Koura.
Flower: Pua.
Fly: Kakaure.
Food: Kai.
Fowl Moa.
Fork: Manga-manga.
Fool: Heva.
Fray: Tana.
Fury: Pohi.
Full: Titi â.
Fancy: Tangi-hangi.

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