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9/11 Photos: Sept. 11 Through the Lens of the New York Fire Department

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Author Topic: 9/11 Photos: Sept. 11 Through the Lens of the New York Fire Department  (Read 342 times)
Victoria Liss
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« on: February 14, 2010, 05:38:39 am »


9/11 Photos: Sept. 11 Through the Lens of the New York Fire Department
Newly released FDNY photos reveal a close-up look at valiant rescue efforts.


Images Show Immediate Aftermath of World Trade Center Collapse
By DEVIN DWYER
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12, 2010

Dozens of photographs taken by the New York City Fire Department and newly released by the government provide a sobering reminder of the conditions at ground zero in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.
Jan Ramirez, curator of National Sept. 11 Museum, reflects on images' value.

More Photos

The images are part of a vast collection of more than 2,700 images amassed by the federal agency investigating the buildings' collapse and first obtained by ABC News last week.

They show, among other things, firefighters climbing atop the massive piles of rubble in darkness, hours before large generator-powered lights were brought in to the scene. Some photos offer a close-up look at the massive debris filling lower Manhattan streets. Others show the thick gray ash and countless pages of white office paper that settled over the devastated area.

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Victoria Liss
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2010, 05:40:02 am »

"We all have particular photographs seared into our visual memories, but this is progressive drama – it's breathtaking in the most horrific way," said Jan Ramirez, chief curator of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum. "It's very important for people to be able to see this."

Click here to watch Jan Ramirez narrate the 9/11 images.

ABCNews.com first published a small sample of the collection that included aerial photos taken by New York City Police Department helicopter pilot Greg Semendinger. A second set of Semendinger's images was released earlier this week.

The rare aerial shots offer a visual narrative of Sept. 11: tugboats and commuter ferries racing to the shoreline near the burning twin towers, the dust and debris plume engulfing lower Manhattan, and the blanket of ash that covered the ground.

Many of the shots are from angles and perspectives not widely seen before.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/sept-11-photos-ground-zero-911-photos-new-york-fire-department/story?id=9819500
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Victoria Liss
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2010, 05:41:13 am »



A truck from Ladder Company 131 based on Brooklyn, N.Y., is caked in dust and ash after racing to the World Trade Center site Sept. 11, 2001. More than 14,500 firefighters took part in the 9/11 response, rescue and recovery efforts, many working through the night to comb the rubble for remains. (FDNY)
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2010, 05:42:04 am »



New York City Fire Department ladder truck 58 from the South Bronx pours water on a collapsed building in the World Trade Center complex Sept. 11, 2001. A firefighter in the foreground is videotaping the scene. The Fire Department is one of the largest contributors to the collection of photos, artifacts, and oral histories being gathered by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, which will put them on display in 2012. (FDNY)
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« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2010, 05:42:36 am »



A New York City Fire Department GMC Suburban was torched by an explosion following the attacks Sept. 11, 2001, at the World Trade Center. Of the roughly 14,000 firefighters who responded after two commercial jetliners struck the Twin Towers, 343 lost their lives. (FDNY)
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« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2010, 05:43:20 am »



New York City Firefighters from Brooklyn-based Ladder Company 146 spray water on the collapsed rubble at Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001. Bright rays of sunshine managed to break through the thick clouds of black smoke and dust as night begins to fall. (FDNY)
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« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2010, 05:44:18 am »



7 World Trade Center, a trapezoidal building adjacent to the Twin Towers, was effectively destroyed Sept. 11, 2001. Part of the building and an overhead walkway to the World Trade Center plaza, seen here, remain standing immediately following the attack. (FDNY)
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« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2010, 05:45:14 am »



Chunks of steel, aluminum and concrete, shards of glass and a layer of white ash fill the streets of lower Manhattan around the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. New York City firefighters assess damage to one of the buildings still standing at the complex. (FDNY)
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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2010, 05:45:58 am »



Thick smoke and toxic fumes continued to rise from the devastation of the World Trade Center towers in lower Manhattan. Recovery workers wearing face masks survey the scene looking for human remains in the hours after the tragedy. Nearly 3,000 people died in the attacks including 343 firefighters, 23 NYPD officers, 37 Port Authority police officers, and thousands of civilians. Many survivors and rescue workers would later be diagnosed with chronic upper and lower respiratory conditions that are believed to be tied to inhalation of the air at Ground Zero. (FDNY)
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« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2010, 05:46:48 am »



Thick gray ash covered the streets near Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001. In the days that followed, many New Yorkers felt motivated to scoop up samples of the highly pulverized residue and save it in baggies and juice bottles and jars. They did it "not really knowing what it meant," said Jan Ramirez, curator of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, "yet sensing there was something almost nuclear about it that they felt they should save." (FDNY)
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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2010, 05:47:25 am »



Firefighters climb atop the massive pile of debris as darkness sets in on the night of Sept. 11, 2001. Investigators estimate only 20 percent of workers at the site were protected by face masks in the initial days after the towers fell. In the background, a piece of the iconic outer skeleton of one of the World Trade Center towers remains standing. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum will display surviving beams from the towers when it opens in 2012. (FDNY)
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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2010, 05:48:03 am »



A New York City Fire Department ladder truck lays upside down, buried beneath collapsed steel and concrete of the World Trade Centers. Two exposed wheels on the truck are missing their rubber tires, which presumably melted away in the heat of the fire after the towers collapsed. In the aftermath of 9/11, President George W. Bush promised $20 billion toward the recovery of lower Manhattan and Congress passed several emergency appropriations to provide billions more in financial assistance. (FDNY)
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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2010, 05:54:21 am »



Thousands of pages of white office paper blanketed lower Manhattan after the collapse of the World Trade Center towers Sept. 11, 2001. New Yorkers who collected sheets from their rooftops, in window wells and on fire escapes of buildings nearby have submitted the documents to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum for preservation. (FDNY)
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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2010, 06:21:18 am »

 Newly Released Sept. 11 Photos From Unique Vantage Points

"They're exceptional," Ramirez said in an interview with ABC News. "When you see this aerial body of work, you are given the rarest overview quite literally of this event as it's transpiring over the full 102 minutes and rest of the day."

The images taken by firefighters on the ground in the immediate aftermath of the buildings' collapse are particularly compelling for their intimacy with the surreal landscape and the level of detail they provide. The streets around the destroyed towers are choked with ash and paper.

"We look at that dust now for an entirely different view of what it represents," said Ramirez. "[It represents] the people that would never come back and, sadly, the health consequences it also caused for thousands of people who came to help thereafter."
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Victoria Liss
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« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2010, 06:21:43 am »

Ramirez said the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, which is also collecting thousands of images from the tragedy, has obtained baggies, juice bottles and jars full of the pulverized residue scooped up by New Yorkers in the days after the attacks. "They did it not really knowing what it meant yet, but sensing there was something almost nuclear about it that they felt they should save," she said.

The museum's collection, expected to open to the public in 2012, also includes artifacts from ground zero, personal effects and memorabilia, expressions of tribute and remembrance, and oral histories given by survivors of the trauma.

Ramirez says some of the most poignent items include selected samples of the white paper that blew across the city after the office buildings were struck and captured in photos from that day.

"Many New Yorkers literally pulled it from their fire escapes and from the window jambs of their apartments and have kept it over all these years…We've been able to trace back and realize -- this is a business card, this was a document, this was a desk memo pad that came from the desk of someone unfortunately who perished that day," said Ramirez.
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