Atlantis Online
October 17, 2019, 03:25:42 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 'Europe's oldest city' found in Cadiz
http://mathaba.net/rss/?x=566660
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Star Trek

Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Star Trek  (Read 1579 times)
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« on: July 23, 2007, 08:17:43 pm »



Star Trek
TV series
Original Series 80 episodes
Animated Series 22 episodes
Next Generation 178 episodes
Deep Space Nine 176 episodes
Voyager 172 episodes
Enterprise 98 episodes
Films
The Motion Picture II: Wrath of Khan
III: Search for Spock
IV: Voyage Home V: Final Frontier
VI: Undiscovered Country
Generations First Contact
Insurrection Nemesis Star Trek (XI)
Major nations & races
UFP Human Vulcan Romulan Q
Klingon Cardassian Bajoran Borg
Ferengi Dominion Mirror Universe
« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 08:30:19 pm by Jennie McGrath » Report Spam   Logged

Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2007, 08:18:57 pm »

Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. The Star Trek fictional universe created by Gene Roddenberry is the setting of six television series including the original 1966 Star Trek, in addition to ten feature films (with an eleventh in pre-production), dozens of computer and video games, hundreds of novels and other fan stories, as well as a themed attraction in Las Vegas. The TV series alone is said to be one of the biggest cult phenomena of modern times.

In the Star Trek "universe", humanity developed faster-than-light space travel following a post-apocalyptic period in the mid-21st century. Later, humans united with other sentient species of the galaxy to form the United Federation of Planets. As a result of alien intervention and science, humanity largely overcame many Earth-bound frailties and vices by the twenty-third century. Star Trek stories usually depict the adventures of human and alien beings who serve in the Federation's Starfleet.

The protagonists are essentially altruists whose ideals are sometimes only imperfectly applied to the dilemmas presented in the series. The conflicts and political dimensions of Star Trek form allegories for contemporary cultural realities; the original Star Trek television series addressed issues of the 1960s, just as later spin-offs have reflected issues of their respective eras. Issues depicted in the various series include war and peace, authoritarianism, imperialism, class warfare, racism, human rights, sexism and feminism, and the role of technology.
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2007, 08:20:16 pm »



The crew of the original Enterprise, except Hikaru Sulu and Christine Chapel, from the episode "I, Mudd".
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2007, 08:21:29 pm »



Star Trek originated as a television series in 1966, although it had been in the planning stages for at least six years prior to that.[2] Although The Original Series was canceled after its third season due to low ratings, it has served as the foundation for five additional Star Trek television series.[3] Altogether, the six series comprise a total of 726 episodes and ten theatrical films (with an 11th in the works) across twenty-two different television seasons (twenty-nine, if one separately counts seasons running concurrently), making it the second most prolific science-fiction franchise in history after Doctor Who. See Lengths of science fiction film and television series for more on comparative series lengths.
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2007, 08:23:00 pm »



The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701)

Star Trek debuted in the United States on NBC on September 8, 1966.[4] The show, starring William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk, told the tale of the crew of the starship Enterprise and that crew's five-year mission "to boldly go where no man has gone before." In its first two seasons it was nominated for Emmy Awards as Best Dramatic Series. However, after only three seasons, the show was canceled and the last episode aired on June 3, 1969.[5] The series subsequently became popular in reruns, and a cult following developed, complete with fan conventions.[4] Originally aired as simply Star Trek, it has in recent years become known as Star Trek: The Original Series or as "Classic Trek" retronyms that distinguish it from its sequels and the franchise as a whole. All subsequent films and television series, except the animated series of the 1970s, have had secondary titles included as part of their official names. A rerelease of the series began in September 2006 with CGI enhancements as a high-definition "Remastered" edition.[6] The first season of Star Trek also is available for download from Apple's iTunes Store. Episodes are offered in their original broadcast forms. Additionally, all of the first season episodes that have been remastered are available. The iTunes Store is the only source for unedited, full-length remastered episodes.[7] The remastered episodes currently air in syndication while the originals appear on TV Land, MyNetworkTV channel, G4 (TV channel), Sci Fi in Australia, The Sci-Fi Channel in the UK, and additionally on BBC2 in the UK, although these broadcasts are infrequent and irregular.
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2007, 08:24:18 pm »



Star Trek The Animated Series title card
Genre Science fiction, Animation
Created by Gene Roddenberry
Starring William Shatner
Leonard Nimoy
DeForest Kelley
James Doohan
George Takei
Nichelle Nichols
Majel Barrett
« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 08:31:02 pm by Jennie McGrath » Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2007, 08:25:49 pm »



Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2007, 08:26:38 pm »

Star Trek: The Animated Series (19731974)

Star Trek: The Animated Series was produced by Filmation and ran for two seasons. Most of the original cast performed the voices of their characters from The Original Series as well as many of the original series' writers like DC Fontana. Larger and more exotic alien landscapes and lifeforms were featured, however animation and soundtrack quality, with the liberal reuse of shots and musical cues as well as occasional animation errors, has detracted from the reputation of the series.[8] Although originally sanctioned by Paramount (who became the owners of the Star Trek franchise following its acquisition of Desilu in 1967), the series is not considered to be canon. Even so, elements of the animated series have been used by writers in later live-action series and movies (e.g. Kirk's middle name, Tiberius, made official in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country), and elements thus incorporated are canon. TAS came back to television in the mid-1980s on the children's cable network Nickelodeon, and in the early 1990s on cable network Sci-Fi Channel and was released to DVD in 2006
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2007, 08:29:07 pm »



Phase II USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-A)

Star Trek: Phase II

Star Trek: Phase II was set to air in 1978 as the flagship series of a proposed Paramount television network, and 12 episode scripts were written before production was due to begin.[10] The series would have put most of the original crew back aboard the Enterprise for a second five-year mission, except for Leonard Nimoy as Spock, who did not agree to return. A younger, full-blooded Vulcan named Xon was planned as a replacement, although it was still hoped that Nimoy would make guest appearances.[10] Sets were constructed and several minutes of test footage were filmed. However, the risks of launching a fourth network and the popularity of the then-recently released film Star Wars led Paramount to make a Star Trek film instead of a weekly television series. The first script of this aborted series formed the basis of Star Trek: The Motion Picture,[11] while three others were eventually adapted as episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
Report Spam   Logged
Volitzer
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 11110



« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2007, 08:31:11 pm »



Star Trek
TV series
Original Series 80 episodes
Animated Series 22 episodes
Next Generation 178 episodes
Deep Space Nine 176 episodes
Voyager 172 episodes
Enterprise 98 episodes
Films
The Motion Picture II: Wrath of Khan
III: Search for Spock
IV: Voyage Home V: Final Frontier
VI: Undiscovered Country
Generations First Contact
Insurrection Nemesis Star Trek (XI)
Major nations & races
UFP Human Vulcan Romulan Q
Klingon Cardassian Bajoran Borg
Ferengi Dominion

Talaxian, Species 8472, Harojin, Kazon,    Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley


 Mirror Universe

Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2007, 08:35:53 pm »

I don't remember the Harojin and the Kazan, which series were they in?
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2007, 08:37:58 pm »

Star Trek: Phase II

Star Trek: Phase II, or Star Trek II was a planned television series based on the characters of Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek. It was set to air in early 1978 on a proposed Paramount Television Service (a precursor of sorts to what would become UPN). The series was to describe the adventures of the Enterprise crew on a second five-year mission after the completion of the first series


Conception and abandonment
Several attempts at a Star Trek motion picture were made in the 1970s, including Gene Roddenberry's 1975 treatment The God Thing, and a later attempt called Planet of the Titans, which proceeded to script stage to be abandoned in 1977. It was decided instead to create a new Star Trek television series, for a new national television network to be owned by Paramount. This was announced on June 17, 1977 with a projected start date of February 1978.[2]

Pre-production work started, with sets built, several television grade models (including the Enterprise herself and many of the pilot episode's models) made, deals made to bring back most of the original series cast, and several actors cast. It was planned to use the original series uniforms. Principal photography had not started, but test footage had been shot. Story writing had proceeded to twelve scripts, enough for a half-season.

The proposed Paramount Television Service folded, and the planned pilot episode, "In Thy Image", following the success of the science fiction movies Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, became instead a theatrical movie, Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2007, 08:40:09 pm »

Cast and characters
 


Phase II screen-test photo of David Gautreaux as Xon




Phase II screen-test photo of Persis Khambatta as Ilia

The series was planned to have included William Shatner and DeForest Kelley reprising their roles as James T. Kirk and Leonard McCoy. Conspicuous by his absence was Leonard Nimoy, who declined to return due to a marketing issue over the Spock character and obligations to the play Equus, although early scripts included him. Nimoy turned down an offer to appear in two of every eleven episodes.[2] Scotty, Uhura, Sulu and Pavel Chekov were all to return, with promotions to Lieutenant Commander for Uhura and Sulu, and to Lieutenant for Chekov. Chekov would have been chief of security. The character of Christine Chapel would also return, having become a doctor since the original series, in which she was a nurse.

The series would have included several new characters, such as Commander Willard 'Will' Decker, the Executive Officer, (possibly introduced to eventually replace Kirk, as William Shatner was only signed for 13 episodes), Lieutenant Ilia, and the Vulcan Lieutenant Xon.

According to the series bible, Xon was to be a full Vulcan, unlike Spock, and fresh out of the Academy at 22. Doctor McCoy was to have been protective about him. The character of Xon did not appear in The Motion Picture, although David Gautreaux had been cast in the role. When Leonard Nimoy finally agreed to reprise Spock, his Vulcan replacement as Science Officer became Commander Sonak, and appeared briefly in the film; after only a few lines of dialogue, he was killed in a transporter accident. This was to preserve Xon, and the actor who had so carefully developed him, for a possible future production. David Gautreaux made a cameo appearance in the movie as a human, Epsilon 9's Commander Branch. [3]

Decker is established in the bible as coming from a long-line of Starfleet officers. The bible notes that he was the son of Commodore Matthew Decker, who had featured in "The Doomsday Machine" (an episode of the original television series), and would "command some landing parties", anticipating the TNG situation where the first officer usually took down away teams. Ilia, a Deltan, is established as an empath. Both the Decker and Ilia characters appear in The Motion Picture, although neither of them survive it. The Motion Picture establishes that Decker and Ilia had a pre-existing relationship. Persis Khambatta was cast as Ilia for Phase II and was carried over onto the film, but Decker remained uncast until after the film project officially began. The TNG characters William T. Riker and Troi are derived from Decker and Ilia.

The concept of the brilliant young Vulcan scientist, Xon, almost survived into a later movie. One premise developed as a possible sequel to the first movie included a male Vulcan called Doctor Savik. [4] A variation of that name, Saavik, was later given to a female Vulcan when elements of several premises were combined for Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2007, 08:41:14 pm »



The upgraded Bridge
Report Spam   Logged
Jennie McGrath
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4348



« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2007, 08:42:06 pm »



Recreation deck
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy