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Tyrannosaurus

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Manetho
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« Reply #30 on: July 23, 2007, 01:57:43 pm »



Sue the Tyrannosaurus, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, showing the forelimbs. The 'wishbone' is between the forelimbs.
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Manetho
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« Reply #31 on: July 23, 2007, 01:58:41 pm »

Notable specimens

Sue Hendrickson, amateur paleontologist, discovered the most complete (more than 90%) and, until 2001 the largest, Tyrannosaurus fossil skeleton known in the Hell Creek Formation near Faith, South Dakota, on August 12, 1990. This Tyrannosaurus, now named "Sue" in her honor, was the object of a legal battle over its ownership. In 1997 this was settled in favor of Maurice Williams, the original land owner, and the fossil collection was sold at auction for USD 7.6 million, making it the most expensive dinosaur skeleton to date. It has now been reassembled and is currently exhibited at the Field Museum of Natural History. Based on a study of 'her' fossilized bones, Sue died at 28 years of age, having reached full size at 19 years of age. Researchers report that a subadult and a juvenile skeleton were found in the same quarry as Sue; this lends evidence to the possibility that tyrannosaurs ran in packs or other groups.[79]

Another Tyrannosaurus, nicknamed "Stan", in honor of amateur paleontologist Stan Sacrison, was found in the Hell Creek Formation near Buffalo, South Dakota, in the spring of 1987. After 30,000 hours of digging and preparing, a 65% complete skeleton emerged. Stan is currently on display in the Black Hills Museum of Natural History Exhibit in Hill City, South Dakota, after an extensive world tour. This tyrannosaur, too, was found to have many bone pathologies, including broken and healed ribs, a broken (and healed) neck and a spectacular hole in the back of its head, about the size of a Tyrannosaurus tooth. Both Stan and Sue were examined by Peter Larson.

In 2001, a 50% complete skeleton of a juvenile Tyrannosaurus was discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, by a crew from the Burpee Museum of Natural History of Rockford, Illinois. Dubbed "Jane the Rockford T-Rex," the find was initially considered the first known skeleton of the pygmy tyrannosaurid Nanotyrannus but subsequent research has revealed that it is more likely a juvenile Tyrannosaurus.[80] It is the most complete and best preserved juvenile example known to date. Jane has been examined by Jack Horner, Pete Larson, Robert Bakker, Greg Erickson and several other renowned paleontologists, because of the uniqueness of her age. Jane is currently on exhibit at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, Illinois.[81][82]

Also in 2001, Dr. Jack Horner discovered a specimen of T. rex around 10% larger than "Sue". Dubbed C. rex (or "Celeste" after Jack's wife), this specimen is currently under study.

In a press release on April 7, 2006, Montana State University revealed that it possessed the largest Tyrannosaurus skull yet discovered. Discovered in the 1960s and only recently reconstructed, the skull measures 59 inches (150 cm) long compared to the 55.4 inches (141 cm) of “Sue’s” skull, a difference of 6.5%.
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« Reply #32 on: July 23, 2007, 01:59:58 pm »



Tyrannosaurus from the movie Jurassic Park.

Appearances in popular culture

Since it was first described in 1905, Tyrannosaurus rex, or "tyrant lizard king" has become the most widely-recognized dinosaur in popular culture. It is the only dinosaur which is routinely referred to by its scientific name (Tyrannosaurus rex) among the general public, and the scientific abbreviation T. rex has also come into wide usage (commonly misspelled "T-Rex").[1] Robert T. Bakker notes this in The Dinosaur Heresies and explains that a name like "Tyrannosaurus rex is just irresistable to the tongue."[85]

Museum exhibits featuring T. rex are very popular; an estimated 10,000 visitors flocked to Chicago's Field Museum on the opening day of its "Sue" exhibit in 2003.[86] T. rex has appeared numerous times on television and in films, notably The Lost World, King Kong, The Land Before Time, Jurassic Park, and Night at the Museum. A number of books and comic strips, including Calvin and Hobbes, have also featured Tyrannosaurus, which is typically portrayed as the biggest and most terrifying carnivore of all. At least one musical group, the band T. Rex, is named after the species. Tyrannosaurus-related toys, including numerous video games and other merchandise, remain popular. Various businesses have capitalized on the popularity of Tyrannosaurus rex by using it in advertisements.

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« Reply #33 on: July 23, 2007, 02:03:07 pm »

Footnotes

1.   ^ a b c d e f Brochu, C.R. 2003. Osteology of Tyrannosaurus rex: insights from a nearly complete skeleton and high-resolution computed tomographic analysis of the skull. Memoirs of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 7: 1-138.
2.   ^ Henderson, D.M. 1999. Estimating the masses and centers of mass of extinct animals by 3-D mathematical slicing. Paleobiology 25: 88–106.
3.   ^ Anderson, J.F., Hall-Martin, A. & Russell, D.A. 1985. Long bone circumference and weight in mammals, birds and dinosaurs. Journal of Zoology 207: 53–61.
4.   ^ a b Bakker, R.T. 1986. The Dinosaur Heresies. New York: Kensington Publishing. 481pp.
5.   ^ a b Farlow, J.O., Smith, M.B., & Robinson, J.M. 1995. Body mass, bone "strength indicator", and cursorial potential of Tyrannosaurus rex. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15: 713-725.
6.   ^ Seebacher, F. 2001. A new method to calculate allometric length-mass relationships iof dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 21(1): 51–60.
7.   ^ Christiansen, P. & Fariρa, R.A. 2004. Mass prediction in theropod dinosaurs. Historical Biology 16: 85-92.
8.   ^ a b c Erickson, G.M., Makovicky, P.J., Currie, P.J., Norell, M.A., Yerby, S.A., & Brochu, C.A. 2004. Gigantism and comparative life-history parameters of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs. Nature 430: 772-775.
9.   ^ a b Currie, P.J., Hurum, J.H., and Sabath, K. 2003. Skull structure and evolution in tyrannosaurid dinosaurs. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 48(2): 227–234. (download here)
10.   ^ a b c Holtz, T.R. 2004. Tyrannosauroidea. In: Weishampel, D.B., Dodson, P., & Osmolska, H. (Eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd Edition). Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 111-136.
11.   ^ a b c Paul, G.S. 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. New York: Simon & Schuster. 464pp.
12.   ^ a b Holtz, T.R. 1994. The phylogenetic position of the Tyrannosauridae: implications for theropod systematics. Journal of Palaeontology 68(5): 1100-1117.
13.   ^ Maleev, E.A. 1955. [Gigantic carnivorous dinosaurs of Mongolia]. Doklady Akademii Nauk S.S.S.R. 104(4): 634-637. [In Russian]
14.   ^ Rozhdestvensky, A.K. 1965. Growth changes in Asian dinosaurs and some problems of their taxonomy. [Paleontological Journal] 3: 95-109.
15.   ^ Carpenter, K. 1992. Tyrannosaurids (Dinosauria) of Asia and North America. In: Mateer, N. & Chen P. (Eds.). Aspects of Nonmarine Cretaceous Geology. Beijing: China Ocean Press Pp. 250-268. (download here)
16.   ^ Carr, T.D., Williamson, T.E., & Schwimmer, D.R. 2005. A new genus and species of tyrannosauroid from the Late Cretaceous (Middle Campanian) Demopolis Formation of Alabama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 25(1): 119–143.
17.   ^ Hurum, J.H. & Sabath, K. 2003. Giant theropod dinosaurs from Asia and North America: Skulls of Tarbosaurus bataar and Tyrannosaurus rex compared. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 48(2): 161–190. (download here)
18.   ^ Olshevsky, George (1995). "The origin and evolution of the tyrannosaurids". Kyoryugaku Saizensen [Dino Frontline] 9-10: 92-119 (9) 75-99 (10). 
19.   ^ Carr, T.D. & Williamson, T.E. 2004. Diversity of late Maastrichtian Tyrannosauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from western North America. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 142: 479–523.
20.   ^ Gilmore, C.W. 1946. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Lance Formation of Montana. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections 106: 1-19.
21.   ^ Bakker, R.T., Williams, M., & Currie, P.J. 1988. Nanotyrannus, a new genus of pygmy tyrannosaur, from the latest Cretaceous of Montana. Hunteria 1(5): 1-30.
22.   ^ Carr TD. 1999. Craniofacial ontogeny in Tyrannosauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 19: 497–520.
23.   ^ Currie, P.J. 2003. Cranial anatomy of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 48(2): 191–226. (download here)
24.   ^ a b Osborn, H.F. 1917. Skeletal adaptations of Ornitholestes, Struthiomimus, Tyrannosaurus. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 35: 733–71.
25.   ^ "T. rex may be in for a name change" by David McCormick. Discovery Channel Canada. 13 June 2000. Accessed 20 July 2006.
26.   ^ International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, Fourth Edition. Article 23.9 - Reversal of Precedence. International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 1 January 2000. Accessed 20 July 2006.
27.   ^ "So why hasn't Tyrannosaurus been renamed Manospondylus?" by Mike Taylor. 27 August 2002. Accessed 20 July 2006.
28.   ^ a b Horner, J.R. & Padian, K. 2004. Age and growth dynamics of Tyrannosaurus rex. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 271: 1875-1880.
29.   ^ a b Schweitzer, M.H., Wittmeyer, J.L., & Horner, J.R. 2005. Gender-specific reproductive tissue in ratites and Tyrannosaurus rex. Science 308: 1456-1460.
30.   ^ a b Erickson, G.M., Currie, P.J., Inouye, B.D., & Winn, A.A. 2006. Tyrannosaur life tables: an example of nonavian dinosaur population biology. Science 313: 213-217.
31.   ^ Carpenter, K. 1990. Variation in Tyrannosaurus rex. In: Carpenter, K. & Currie, P.J. (Eds.). Dinosaur Systematics: Approaches and Perspectives. New York: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 141-145. (download here)
32.   ^ Larson, P.L. 1994. Tyrannosaurus sex. In: Rosenberg, G.D. & Wolberg, D.L. Dino Fest. The Paleontological Society Special Publications. 7: 139-155.
33.   ^ Erickson, G.M., Lappin, A.K., & Larson, P.L. 2005. Androgynous rex. The utility of chevrons for determining the sex of crocodilians and non-avian dinosaurs. Zoology 108: 277-286.
34.   ^ Schweitzer, M.H., Elsey, R.M., Dacked, C.G., Horner. J.R., & Lamm, E.-T. 2007. Do egg-laying crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) archosaurs form medullary bone? Bone 40 (4): 1152-1158. DOI:10.1016/j.bone.2006.10.029
35.   ^ Leidy, J. 1865. Memoir on the extinct reptiles of the Cretaceous formations of the United States. Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. 14: 1-135.
36.   ^ "Tyrannosaurus" American Museum of Natural History. (20 July 2006).
37.   ^ a b Newman, B.H. 1970. Stance and gait in the flesh-eating Tyrannosaurus. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 2: 119-123.
38.   ^ a b Osborn, H.F. 1905. Tyrannosaurus and other Cretaceous carnivorous dinosaurs. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 21: 259-265. (download here)
39.   ^ Lambe, L.M. 1914. On a new genus and species of carnivorous dinosaur from the Belly River Formation of Alberta, with a description of the skull of Stephanosaurus marginatus from the same horizon. Ottawa Naturalist 27: 129-135.
40.   ^ a b c Horner, J.R. & Lessem, D. 1993. The Complete T. rex: How Stunning New Discoveries Are Changing Our Understanding of the World's Most Famous Dinosaur. New York: Simon & Schuster. 235pp.
41.   ^ Osborn, H.F. 1906. Tyrannosaurus, Upper Cretaceous carnivorous dinosaur (second communication). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 22: 281-296. (download here)
42.   ^ Carpenter, K. & Smith, M.B. 2001. Forelimb osteology and biomechanics of Tyrannosaurus. In: Tanke, D.H. & Carpenter, K. (Eds.). Mesozoic Vertebrate Life. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Pp. 90-116. (download here)
43.   ^ Schweitzer M.H., Wittmeyer J.L., Horner J.R., Toporski J.B. 2005. Soft Tissue Vessels and Cellular Preservation in Tyrannosaurus rex. Science 307: 1952-1955.
44.   ^ Fields, H. Dinosaur Shocker. Smithsonian Magazine Online. Retrieved on 2006-05-01.
45.   ^ Rincon, Paul. Protein links T. rex to chickens. Retrieved on April 12, .
46.   ^ Yesterday's T. Rex is today's chicken. Yahoo news, APR. 13, 2007.
47.   ^ Xu X., Norell, M.A., Kuang X., Wang X., Zhao Q., & Jia C. 2004. Basal tyrannosauroids from China and evidence for protofeathers in tyrannosauroids. Nature 431: 680-684.
48.   ^ Bakker, R.T. 1968. The superiority of dinosaurs. Discovery 3: 11-22.
49.   ^ Bakker, R.T. 1972. Anatomical and ecological evidence of endothermy in dinosaurs. Nature 238: 81-85.
50.   ^ Barrick, R.E. & Showers, W.J. 1994. Thermophysiology of Tyrannosaurus rex: Evidence from oxygen isotopes. Science 265: 222-224.
51.   ^ Trueman, C., Chenery, C., Eberth, D.A. & Spiro, B. 2003. Diagenetic effects on the oxygen isotope composition of bones of dinosaurs and other vertebrates recovered from terrestrial and marine sediments. Journal of the Geological Society, London 160: 895–901.
52.   ^ Barrick, R.E. & Showers, W.J. 1999. Thermophysiology and biology of Giganotosaurus: comparison with Tyrannosaurus. Palaeontologia Electronica 2 (2): 22pp.
53.   ^ Barrick, R.E., Stoskopf, M. & Showers, W.J. 1997. Oxygen isotopes in dinosaur bones. In: Farlow, J.O. & Brett-Surman, M. (Eds.). The Complete Dinosaur. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Pp. 474-490.
54.   ^ Paladino, F.V., Spotila, J.R., & Dodson, P. 1997. A blueprint for giants: modeling the physiology of large dinosaurs. In: Farlow, J.O. & Brett-Surman, M. (Eds.). The Complete Dinosaur. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Pp. 491-504.
55.   ^ Chinsamy, A. & Hillenius, W.J. 2004. Physiology of nonavian dinosaurs. In: Weishampel, D.B., Dodson, P., & Osmolska, H. (Eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd Edition). Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 643-659.
56.   ^ Horner, J.R., (1994). Steak knives, beady eyes, and tiny little arms (a portrait of Tyrannosaurus as a scavenger). The Paleontological Society Special Publication 7: 157-164.
57.   ^ a b Walters, M., Paker, J. (1995). Dictionary of Prehistoric Life. Claremont Books. ISBN 1-85471-648-4.
58.   ^ Farlow, J. O. and Holtz, T. R. Jr. 2002. The fossil record of predation in dinosaurs. pp. 251–266, in M. Kowalewski and P. H. Kelley (eds.), The Fossil Record of Predation. The Paleontological Society Papers 8.
59.   ^ Dorey, M. (1997). Tyrannosaurus. Dinosaur Cards. Orbis Publishing Ltd. D36045907.
60.   ^ Stevens, K.A. (2006) Binocular vision in theropod dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 26(2):321-330
61.   ^ Tanke, D.H. & Currie, R.J. Head-Biting Behavior in Theropod Dinosaurs: Paleopathological Evidence. May 2000. Gaia 15
62.   ^ Goldstone, E. (1997). Injury & Disease, Part 3. Dinosaur Cards. Orbis Publishing Ltd. D36045009.
63.   ^ Erickson, G. M., and Olson, K. H. (1996). "Bite marks attributable to Tyrannosaurus rex: preliminary description and implications." Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 16(1): 175-178.
64.   ^ Carpenter, K. (2000). "Evidence of predatory behavior by carnivorous dinosaurs." Gaia, 15: 135-144.
65.   ^ Fowler, D. W., and Sullivan, R. M. (2006). "A ceratopsid pelvis with toothmarks from the Upper Cretaceous Kirtland Formation, New Mexico: evidence of late Campanian tyrannosaurid feeding behavior." New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 35: 127-130.
66.   ^ "The bigger they come, the harder they fall" New Scientist, October 7, 1995, p. 18.
67.   ^ a b c Hajdul, R. (1997). Tendons. Dinosaur Cards. Orbis Publishing Ltd. D36044311.
68.   ^ Hecht, J. (1998). The deadly dinos that took a dive. New Scientist 2130.
69.   ^ Giraffe. WildlifeSafari.info. Retrieved on 2006-04-29.
70.   ^ The History of Woodland Park Zoo - Chapter 4. Retrieved on 2006-04-29.
71.   ^ a b Hutchinson, J. R. and Garcia, M. (2002). Tyrannosaurus was not a fast runner. Nature 415: 1018-1021
72.   ^ Unearthing T. rex: T. rex In-Depth: Traits (See above). Retrieved on December 11, 2005.
73.   ^ Was the T-Rex Really That Fast?. Retrieved on December 11, 2005.
74.   ^ Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.. Gracility and Speed of T. rex. Dinosauria online.
75.   ^ "Tyrannosaurus had poor turning circle" Cosmos magazine
76.   ^ Osborn, H. F. 1905.Tyrannosaurus and other Cretaceous carnivorous dinosaurs. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 21;259-265
77.   ^ White, S. (1997). Tyrannosaurus. Dinosaur Cards. Orbis Publishing Ltd. D36046009.
78.   ^ Online guide to the continental Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Raton basin, Colorado and New Mexico
79.   ^ Guinness World Records Ltd. (2003). 2003 Guinness World Records. pg 90.
80.   ^ Currie, P. J., Hurum, J. H., and Sabath, K. 2003. Skull structure and evolution in tyrannosaurid dinosaurs. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 48: 227-234
81.   ^ Croucher, B. (1997). Beast of the Badlands. Dinosaur Cards. Orbis Publishing Ltd. D36045407.
82.   ^ Visit Jane.com. Official musuem website.
83.   ^ Museum unveils world's largest T-rex skull.. Retrieved on April 7, 2006.
84.   ^ Ryan, M. J. New Biggest T-rex Skull.. Retrieved on April 12, 2006.
85.   ^ Robert T. Bakker, The Dinosaur Heresies: New Theories Unlocking the Mystery of the Dinosaurs and their Extinction (New York: William Morrow Company, 1986) page 464.
86.   ^ Guinness World Records Ltd. 2003. 2003 Guinness World Records. p. 90.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrannosaurus#_note-ericksonetal2006
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Manetho
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« Reply #34 on: July 23, 2007, 02:06:03 pm »



T-Rex opposite of the de:Senckenberg-Museum in Frankfurt
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« Reply #35 on: July 23, 2007, 02:07:05 pm »



replica of the T-rex
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« Reply #36 on: July 23, 2007, 02:08:07 pm »

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« Reply #37 on: July 23, 2007, 02:09:00 pm »

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« Reply #38 on: July 23, 2007, 02:09:45 pm »

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« Reply #43 on: July 23, 2007, 02:23:58 pm »

Tyrannosaurus rex is unique among dinosaurs in its place in modern culture. From the beginning, it was embraced by the public. Henry Fairfield Osborn, the President of the American Museum of Natural History, intentionally billed it as the greatest hunter to have ever walked the earth. He stated in 1905:[1]

“ I propose to make this animal the type of the new genus, Tyrannosaurus, in reference to its size, which far exceeds than of any carnivorous land animal hitherto described... This animals is in fact the ne plus ultra of the evolution of the large carnivorous dinosaurs: in brief it is entitled to the royal and high sounding group name which I have applied to it. ”

As for the public, it too was electrified and on December 30, 1905, the New York Times hailed T. rex as "the most formidable fighting animal of which there is any record whatever," the "king of all kings in the domain of animal life," "the absolute warlord of the earth," and a "royal man-eater of the jungle." [2] In 1906, when the skeleton was erected, Tyrannosaurus was dubbed the "prize fighter of antiquity" and the "Last of the Great Reptiles and the King of Them All."

At the time of its discovery it was the largest known land predator in history and although it has now been displaced in this respect first by the marginally larger Giganotosaurus and then Spinosaurus, it is still popularly perceived as the most fearsome of all prehistoric creatures. Tyrannosaurus has come to represent the quintessential large, meat eating dinosaur in popular culture and is embraced by people the world over as "King of the Dinosaurs" as its name suggests.
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« Reply #44 on: July 23, 2007, 02:25:37 pm »

Film appearances

T. rex has played a major role in these films:

•   Abra-Catastrophe!. the Fairly Odd Parents movie, shows Wanda as a T. rex in the Jurassic Park portion of Timmy's dream.
•   Adventures in Dinosaur City - An anthropomorphic Tyrannosaurus named Rex is one of the film's main protagonists.
•   Carnosaur - A genetically engineered Tyrannosaurus, which has been given a small amount of human DNA, battles with two construction machines driven by the main characters at the climax of the film.
•   Carnosaur 2 - Another artificially created T. rex is found in a nuclear storage facility, and battles a forklift at the film's climax.
•   Carnosaur 3 - Yet another genetically engineered T. rex is accidentally hijacked by a terrorist group, which is eaten by the T. rex and three raptors. The T. rex is lured onto a ship, where its head is blown off with explosives just before the entire ship explodes.
•   Fantasia - The Tyrannosaurus was featured twice during this Disney film, the first in which a Tyrannosaurus terrorizes a large herd of several different dinosaur genera, then fights a winning battle with a Stegosaurus (This sequence is technically impossible, since Stegosaurus had been extinct for millions of years before T. rex appeared. However, the dinosaur has three fingers, so it could actually be an Allosaurus instead). The second is a sequence showing the death of numerous dinosaurs in the heat of a hot sun. This perhaps shows how the last of the dinosaurs died after a climate change.
•   Godzilla - Godzilla is not a Tyrannosaurus, (a fact explicitly mentioned in Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah; he is, in fact, a "Godzillasaurus") but his design was partially inspired by one.
•   Ice Age - Tyrannosaurus is seen briefly frozen in ice during a scene in the movie, but plays no large role in the movie.
•   Jurassic Park - Tyrannosaurus is the main dinosaur in the film, as well as its first sequel (see below), after it is brought back to life using blood from a fossilized mosquito. After breaking free of its enclosure, the Tyrannosaurus proceeds to hunt and kill scientists and tourists remaining on the island it was placed on.
•   The Lost World: Jurassic Park - The Tyrannosaurus reprises its role as the lead dinosaur for the sequel to Jurassic Park. In this film, an infant Tyrannosaurus is injured and rescued by scientists. They cure it, and are attacked when its parents find them.
•   Jurassic Park III - for this sequel to the Jurassic Park series, the Tyrannosaurus is defeated by the larger Spinosaurus in the opening stages of the film. The defeat, however, did little to sway the public popularity of the Tyrannosaurus.
•   King Kong (1933) - King Kong battles a Tyrannosaurus in a climatic scene to the movie while trying to protect Ann Darrow.
•   King Kong (2005) - Actually "Vastatosaurus rex", a fictional species which supposedly evolved from T. rex, though the screenplay refers to the dinosaur as T. rex, and one of the movie scenes on the DVD is called "The T-Rex Battle". Instead of fighting one as in the original film, Kong battles three all at once.
•   Rebirth of Mothra III - A T. rex made an appearance when Mothra went back in time to the Cretaceous Period to defeat Cretaceous King Ghidorah.
•   T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous - The semi-educational IMAX 3D film features the Tyrannosaurus in various time travel sequences, as well as its discoverer Barnum Brown.
•   The Land Before Time - The series featured Sharptooth and many others Tyrannosaurids. A young, friendly Tyrannosaurus named Chomper becomes an important minor character to the film series.
•   The Last Dinosaur - A wealthy trophy hunter dupes a team of scientists to lead him to a hidden pocket of primordial life. After being decimated, the surviving scientists flee, but the great white hunter elects to stay and continue to hunt the T rex.
•   Meet the Robinsons - This movie features a T. rex named Tiny as the pet of the Robinsons' family.
•   Night at the Museum - the movie features an undead dinosaur skeleton chasing Ben Stiller through the museum.
•   Planet of the Dinosaurs - A spaceship crashes on an uncharted planet, inhabited by creatures identical to Dinosaurs, including a Tyrannosaurus.
•   Prehysteria - A baby T. rex named "Elvis" (after Elvis Presley) is one of many baby dinosaurs featured in the film. The name appears to be a pun; Elvis Presley is the "King of Rock n' Roll", and Tyrannosaurus rex means "Tyrant Lizard King."
•   Raptor - In the 2001 Roger Corman movie the creatures are said to be Tyrannosaurus rather than the Velociraptor the title refers to. In fact, the word raptor isn't used throughout the entire film.
•   Theodore Rex.
•   Toy Story - In the Disney/Pixar film Toy Story and its sequel Toy Story 2 Tyrannosaurus is portrayed as a T. rex toy named "Rex".
•   Toy Story 2 - "Rex" appears again in this film.
•   The Valley of Gwangi - Gwangi is technically meant to be an Allosaurus, but Ray Harryhausen based his model for the creature off a Tyrannosaurus. Harryhausen often confuses the two, stating in a DVD interview "We called it an Allosaurus, occasionally... they're both meat eaters, they're both Tyrants... one was just a bit larger then the other."
•   We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story - A friendly, intelligent, genetically enhanced Tyrannosaurus named Rex is the film's main character and narrator.

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