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The X-Files

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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2007, 03:50:12 am »




The Syndicate and its mysterious member the Cigarette Smoking Man, played by William B. Davis, became increasingly important to X-Files "mythology" as the show progressed.
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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2007, 03:51:28 am »



Season three's "Nisei" began a story arc with Mulder investigating an alien autopsy tape, and Scully confronting the possible effects of her abduction.
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« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2007, 03:52:40 am »



Mr. X, played by Steven Williams, became closely involved from the second to fourth seasons. The informant was so-named for Mulder's masking-tape "X" on his window, used to call a meeting.

Morgan's third effort of the season, and his final episode as an X-Files script writer, was "Jose Chung's 'From Outer Space'," which presented multiple perspectives as in Kurosawa's Rashomon, and made fun of the X-Files mythology while remaining consistent with it. Graeme Murray and Shirley Inget were nominated for an Emmy for art direction. Morgan would later write a sequel also involving the writer Jose Chung (Charles Nelson Reilly), for Chris Carter's other series, Millennium in 1998.

In the spring of 1996, The X-Files began to achieve wide recognition. In addition to its eight Emmy nominations in its third season, of which it won five, it was awarded a George Foster Peabody Award for excellence in television broadcasting. Both David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson were nominated for Screen Actors Guild Awards for the first time, and Anderson won. Both actors were also nominated for Golden Globe Awards. Guest stars in season 3 included Jesse Ventura and Alex Trebek (both "men in black" in "Jose Chung's"), Giovanni Ribisi and Jack Black (in "D.P.O.," about a young man who can control lightning), Lucy Liu and B.D. Wong (in "Hell Money," about mysterious and deadly occurrences in the Chinese immigrant community), JT Walsh (in "The List", about the reincarnation of a death row prisoner), and R. Lee Ermey (in "Revelations", about a stigmatic boy, the first of several episodes in the series to deal directly with Scully's Catholic faith). Black, Ribisi and Liu were not widely known at the time they appeared on The X-Files. Dave Grohl also had a cameo in the "Pusher".[66] His rock band, Foo Fighters, were fans of the show, and contributed songs to the compilation album, Songs in the Key of X, released that spring. They also contributed to The X-Files movie two years later (see below for other pop culture inspirations).

The final part of the season brought the episode "Avatar" (the first episode centered around Mitch Pileggi's Assistant Director Walter Skinner, who was being punished by the Syndicate for his efforts on behalf of Mulder and Scully), "Quagmire" (about a lake monster; the famous "conversation on the rock" between Mulder and Scully was added by script editor Darin Morgan as his last contribution to The X-Files[67]), "Wetwired" (an episode involving a conspiracy to send subliminal messages in TV reception), and season finale "Talitha Cumi," which introduced Jeremiah Smith (Roy Thinnes), an alien with healing powers. The finale had a complex plot, tying back to Mulder's mother's past with the Cigarette Smoking Man. One scene, produced by writers Chris Carter and David Duchovny, was modeled directly after "The Grand Inquisitor" chapter from Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov.[68] The episode was again a cliffhanger, "to be continued" in the next season.



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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2007, 03:53:35 am »



Scully in the self-referential comedy "Jose Chung's 'From Outer Space'", an episode so complex its director Rob Bowman said he had to read Darin Morgan's script "15 times before he understood it."[63]
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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2007, 03:55:56 am »

Season 4 (1996-1997)

The next season began with The X-Files' highest ratings success to that point, with "Herrenvolk".[4] The season premiere introduced several new elements to the conspiracy: "killer bees" designed to unleash smallpox, clones and alien hybrids, United Nations Special Representative Marita Covarrubias (played by Laurie Holden), and the removal of a previous important character. Covarrubias became an informer to Mulder and Scully in several episodes in the season, such as "Teliko" and "Unrequited." However it was the horror episode "Home," signaling the return of Morgan and Wong as writers after their canceled Space: Above and Beyond, that was most noticed. "Home" told the story of an inbred family of murderers in rural Pennsylvania, with references to The Andy Griffith Show and grisly violence contrasted with calm, becoming a hit with many fans ("X-Philes") and dividing others.[69] FOX's Standards and Practices department granted it a rare TV-MA "Parental Advisory" rating and refused to ever air it again,[70] though the episode later went into syndication.

Two major changes occurred behind the scenes in the autumn of 1996, during the early part of the fourth season. Chris Carter's new series Millennium, also produced in Vancouver, debuted on Friday nights. As a result, The X-Files was moved from Friday night to Sunday, seen as a key to better ratings success, although Carter was initially wary[71] and the decision was controversial with the show's audience.[72] The first episode to air in the new time period was "Unruhe", written by Vince Gilligan and directed by Rob Bowman. It was one of the series' darkest episodes, dealing with a man (played by Pruitt Taylor Vince) who lobotomizes women and can project his fantasies in "thought photography". Gilligan also wrote "Paper Hearts", an emotional episode for Mulder, twisting his memories of his sister's disappearance with a case involving an unrepentant child killer.

Wong and Morgan contributed their own, possibly non-canon addition to the mythology,[73] "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man", which referenced Shakespearian history, tied The X-Files to real life conspiracy theories about the JFK and MLK assassinations and was the first episode in which neither Mulder or Scully appears on screen (except in flashback). The death of Lone Gunmen member Frohike was originally going to be in the episode, before Carter nixed the idea, but the scene was actually shot by director James Wong.[73] Chris Owens, later to play other roles for the show, first appeared in this episode as the young CSM. The action-oriented "Tunguska" and "Terma" were the more traditional mythology episodes for the autumn sweeps period, sending Mulder and Krycek to a Russian gulag and involving the black oil and the Syndicate closely. X-Files ratings by the middle of the fourth season were as high as they had ever been,[4] and by autumn 1996 it was the FOX network's most popular show.[13]

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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #20 on: July 23, 2007, 03:56:48 am »



"Unruhe," about a crazy man who performs "icepick lobotomies" to cure women of their "unrest," was one of many dark episodes in season 4, and the first to air in The X-Files' new Sunday night time.
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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2007, 03:58:01 am »

Many episodes of the fourth season were character driven, such as "The Field Where I Died" and "Demons," both about Mulder trying to recover his past, or past lives. "Never Again", Morgan and Wong's final episode of the series, centered on Scully's personal life. Jodie Foster provided the voice of a tattoo. It had originally been planned as a collaboration with director Quentin Tarantino,[74] but Tarantino was not allowed to work in network television because he was not a member of the Directors Guild of America.[75] The episode was ultimately directed by Rob Bowman, with an homage to Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy. FOX had attained rights to broadcast Super Bowl XXXI in January 1997 and planned to showcase The X-Files in the premier post-game slot. As a result, "Never Again" was bumped to the next week, and "Leonard Betts", a stylish and gory monster-of-the-week episode about an EMT (played by Paul McCrane) who was decapitated and could regrow his body, received the coveted spot (episodes of The X-Files were often aired slightly out of production order). "Leonard Betts" became the all time most-watched X-Files episode, with 17.2 Nielsen rating and 29% audience share.[4] It was also the first episode to be written by the team of Vince Gilligan, John Shiban and Frank Spotnitz, who were responsible for many episodes during the show's middle-to-late era.

The air date of "Leonard Betts" became relevant because the final scenes of the episode were central to the ongoing mytharc of the show and led directly into the events of "Memento Mori", in which it is revealed that Dana Scully has contracted terminal brain cancer. When originally aired, however, the episode "Never Again" came between these, implying Scully's behavior in that episode was a result of her diagnosis; Gillian Anderson said she would have played the role completely differently if that had been the case.[74] Nevertheless, Anderson's performances during the fourth season "cancer arc" were praised. She won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series in 1997, as well as her second straight Screen Actors Guild award and a Golden Globe. "Memento Mori" relied on extended emotional voiceovers, a technique that had become increasingly common in the show over the years, as Scully came to grips with her illness while simultaneously investigating its origins, leading back to her own abduction. Mulder, Walter Skinner and the Cigarette Smoking Man all became dramatically involved, which played out in the later episode "Zero Sum", one of the few episodes of the show not to feature Anderson's involvement, although the events were driven by Scully's worsening condition, as well as the Syndicate's plans for unleashing killer bees.

Once Scully had contracted cancer, she continued to work in her former capacity as Mulder's partner investigating X-Files, apparently debilitated only by occasional nosebleeds, though the issue of mortality was again addressed in "Elegy" late in the season. In the intervening time, notable episodes included the two-part "Tempus Fugit" and "Max", in which Max Fenig from season one's "Fallen Angel" returned briefly as the agents investigated mysterious "lost time" in a deadly plane crash, loosely modeled on TWA Flight 800.

Amidst what was considered the show's darkest year, "Small Potatoes" provided a lighter tone.[76] The episode was written by Vince Gilligan, and featured departed X-Files writer and former Flukeman Darin Morgan in the role of Eddie Van Blundht, a shape-shifting self-described "loser" who becomes the focus of Scully and Mulder's investigation of a West Virginia town where children are being born with tails. The final scenes of the episode provided "shippers" with the sight of "Mulder" and Scully finally together, the first of many such jokes by the writers in later seasons. Season 4 ended with "Gethsemane," a resolution which appeared to leave one main character near death and kill off the other one, as well as turning his entire belief system into a house of cards.
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Jennifer O'Dell
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« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2007, 03:58:54 am »



Renegade agent Alex Krycek, played by Nicholas Lea, was central to the X-Files mythology, such as in the two-part "Tunguska" and "Terma" episodes set partly in Russia.
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« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2007, 03:59:55 am »



Dana Scully contracted cancer in season four, an acting challenge for Gillian Anderson, who won an Emmy for the role in 1997. Her illness was central to "Memento Mori" and was resolved in the "Redux" episodes, beginning the fifth season.
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« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2007, 04:00:59 am »



Jeffrey Spender (Chris Owens) was a new character in season 5. Owens also played "The Great Mutato" in Chris Carter's "Post-Modern Prometheus," a black-and-white Frankenstein adaptation.

Season 5 (1997-1998)

When season 5 opened, to the show's best numbers ever[4] (with the exception of "Leonard Betts"), it turned out Fox Mulder was still alive, having gone into hiding after becoming involved with Michael Kritschgau, a renegade Department of Defense employee. The continuation of the three-part arc with "Redux" and "Redux II" brought Scully's metastasizing cancer to the fore, as Mulder continued to question his own ideas about aliens and government conspiracies, while working to find a cure to a disease he believes the government gave Scully. Scully is finally cured, though it's unclear what has caused the intervention, and what sacrifices have been made for the end. Skinner's loyalties are in question, and the Cigarette Smoking Man is seemingly put out of commission by the Syndicate.

These events were soon followed by Chris Carter's "The Post-Modern Prometheus", which he both wrote and directed. It was the show's only episode filmed entirely in black-and-white, a retelling of the story of Frankenstein (subtitled by author Mary Shelley, The Modern Prometheus), mixed with allusions to Young Frankenstein, Jerry Springer, comic books, David Lynch's The Elephant Man, and Cher. Carter earned his second DGA nomination for his work. A few months earlier in 1997, The X-Files had received its largest awards recognition yet for its fourth season, with 12 Emmy nominations including best drama series, sound mixing, makeup, music, directing, writing, two nominations for editing, and wins for sound editing, art direction, and Anderson. Duchovny was also nominated at both this event and at the Golden Globes, where along with Anderson's win, he won best actor in a TV drama and the show itself won that category for a second year—taking all three top awards. The X-Files also won a second Saturn Award for best genre television series, and Anderson won for best actress; these awards were given by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films.[52]

Chris Carter's contract with FOX ran through the fifth season,[39] and he and the stars had originally preferred to stop there,[71] turning The X-Files into a series of films; but the show was such a hit that FOX was intent to continue it on TV in some form, and Carter was convinced to sign a new contract, retaining creative control.[77] In a very rare move for a show still in production,[1] a feature film of The X-Files had been planned by Carter ever since the show achieved commercial success in season two.[29] The movie's scripts were printed in red ink to ensure secrecy,[46] and it was largely filmed in California between season four's "Gethsemane" and season five's resumption of the plot with "Redux", pushing back the debut date for the season to November 1997 and resulting in the fifth being (until the ninth) the shortest season, only 20 episodes.[78]

As a result, several episodes in season five featured either Scully or Mulder at the expense of the other, to make time for personal projects or re-shoots on the film throughout the season (both stars were now reportedly receiving the same pay, $100,000 per episode[46]). "Christmas Carol" and "Emily", written by the team of Spotnitz, Gilligan and Shiban, were the first mythology episodes mostly centered around Scully. In "Christmas Carol", she receives further information about her abduction, coinciding with the mysterious arrival of a young child into her life.

Another result was that two episodes of the season, "Unusual Suspects" and "Travelers", focused on the origins of The Lone Gunmen in 1989 and the origin of the X-File cases at the FBI during the McCarthy era in the 1950s, respectively. Duchovny appears only briefly in the episodes, and Anderson is in neither. Richard Belzer guest starred in "Unusual Suspects," playing Detective John Munch of Homicide and many other series. "Unusual Suspects" was later followed up in the sixth season with "Three of a Kind," and these episodes about Lone Gunmen John Fitzgerald Byers (Bruce Harwood), Richard "Ringo" Langly (Dean Haglund), and Melvin Frohike (Tom Braidwood) later became the basis for a short-lived spinoff in 2001.

Early in 1998, the show, largely written by a staff of regulars,[29] aired its first episodes by well-known guest writers. Stephen King contributed "Chinga", about a demonic doll, which was co-written with Chris Carter and featured Scully investigating the case, between tongue-in-cheek phone conversations with Mulder. The episode, directed by Kim Manners, received mixed reviews. Next up was "Kill Switch", written by cyberpunk author William Gibson along with Tom Maddox. The episode covered issues of virtual reality and received better reception.[79] Then an episode aired where both Mulder and Scully's diverging viewpoints on a vampire case were presented, and humorously contrasted. Vince Gilligan's "Bad Blood", another pairing with "Small Potatoes" director Cliff Bole, was a fan favorite[80] and featured Luke Wilson in a guest role as a young Texas sheriff with or without "buck teeth".

In February, the fifth season continued a tradition of mythology episodes in sweeps month and aired the dramatic two-part episodes "Patient X" and "The Red and the Black", the latter of which was again directed by Carter. These dealt with the beginning of colonization, and introduced two new characters, Cassandra Spender (a chronic alien abductee, played by Veronica Cartwright, who was nominated for two Emmys in the role) and her estranged son Jeffrey Spender (a colleague of Mulder and Scully at the FBI, played by Chris Owens). The episodes also juxtaposed Mulder's ongoing crisis of belief in the existence of aliens, with the machinations of the Syndicate and Scully's own personal experiences. Krycek and Covarrubias were involved, while the Cigarette Smoking Man continued to be largely out of the picture during the fifth season. Leading up to the end of the year, more monster of the week episodes were aired, including "Mind's Eye" (guest starring Lili Taylor as a blind woman suspected of murder, and written by season 5 story editor Tim Minear), "The Pine Bluff Variant" (about Mulder's involvement in a plot to spread deadly biological terrorism, with tie-ins to the ongoing mythology) and "Folie a Deux" (about Mulder and Scully's investigation into a telemarketing employee who claimed his boss could turn into an insect).

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« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2007, 04:02:58 am »

David Duchovny had been unhappy with his geographical separation from his wife Téa Leoni, as well as with climatic conditions in Vancouver.[81] Gillian Anderson also wanted to return home to the United States,[28] and Carter decided to move production to Los Angeles following the fifth season. The season ended in May 1998 with "The End", the final episode shot in Vancouver and the final episode with the involvement of many of the original crew members who had worked on the show for its previous five years, including director and producer R. W. Goodwin and his wife Sheila Larken (who played Margaret Scully and would later return briefly). "The End" introduced Diana Fowley, a new character who had apparently once worked with Mulder on early X-Files, but it focused largely on the efforts of the Syndicate to get control of mind-reading chess prodigy Gibson Praise.

The X-Files were closed for a second time in this episode (following season 2). This set up the events of the movie, The X-Files, which had just completed post-production and was to open in theatres one month later. The show finished its fifth season with a season Nielsen average of 12.1, its all time peak viewership,[4] and an X-Files record of 16 Emmy nominations (winning two), in addition to winning the Golden Globe for best drama series for the third year. Overall, seasons three to five appear to have marked the show's most popular and acclaimed period.

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« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2007, 04:03:46 am »



"The End" was the last episode to be filmed in rainy Vancouver, British Columbia (pictured), closing season 5. The show produced 117 episodes in Canada before moving to Los Angeles in its sixth season.
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« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2007, 04:05:54 am »



The X-Files movie, also known as Fight the Future, had a worldwide theatrical box office total of $189 million. The movie's production cost was close to $66 million,[82] and its advertising budget was similar.
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« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2007, 04:06:47 am »

The X-Files (film)

In summer 1998 the series produced a feature length motion picture, The X-Files, also known as The X Files: Fight the Future. It was intended as a continuation of the season five finale "The End" (5x20), but was also meant to stand on its own.[78] The season six opener "The Beginning" picked up where the movie left off. (Although the events are supposed to occur between the fifth and sixth seasons, the majority of the film was actually shot in the break between the show's fourth and fifth seasons.)

The movie, written by Chris Carter and Frank Spotnitz and directed by series regular Rob Bowman, was more action-oriented than a typical episode, but it dealt with the central mythology and conspiracy of the show. In addition to Mulder, Scully, Walter Skinner and the Cigarette Smoking Man, it featured guest appearances by Martin Landau, Armin Mueller-Stahl, and Blythe Danner as characters that only appeared in the movie (though Mueller-Stahl's Conrad Strughold is later mentioned in the series). It also had the last X-Files appearance by John Neville as the Well-Manicured Man. Jeffrey Spender, Diana Fowley and Gibson Praise do not appear in the film. The film had a strong domestic opening and got mostly positive reviews from critics, however, its box office dropped sharply after the first weekend. Although it failed to make a profit during theatrical release, due to a very high promotional budget, The X-Files film was more successful internationally. Anderson and Duchovny both received equal pay for the film, unlike their original contracts for the series.
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« Reply #29 on: July 23, 2007, 04:07:55 am »



Plot summary

The movie opens in prehistoric times in a wordless sequence. A pre-historic man stumbles upon what appears to be a large, primal, vicious alien in a cave (although the camerawork uses zooms and flash-edits to keep the creature from being visualized fully). The two fight, and the caveman wins, stabbing the alien to death. However, what fans of the show will recognize as the black oil bleeds from the alien's wounds and soaks into the Neanderthal. After a fade to modern-day small-town Texas, a little boy (Lucas Black) falls down a hole in his back yard, and finds a human skull. As he picks it up, black oil seeps out of the skull and into the boy's skin, as a team of firemen descend to rescue him.

In the summer of 1998, at the end of the show's fifth season, the X-Files were shut down, and Fox Mulder and Dana Scully were assigned to other projects. They are first seen assisting SAC Darius Michaud (Terry O'Quinn), and his FBI team investigating a bomb threat to a federal building in Dallas, Texas. When Mulder separates from the team to scout out the building across the street, he discovers the bomb. He and Scully are able to evacuate the building and prevent hundreds of casualties before it explodes. (Several media commentators noted parallels between this and the real-life 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing.)[1][2]

Mulder and Scully return home to Washington, DC, but instead of commending their roles in preventing the deaths of hundreds, they are instead chastised because four victims were still in the building: three firemen, and one little boy. They are both scheduled separate hearings in which their job performance will be evaluated.

That evening, Mulder encounters a paranoid doctor, Alvin Kurtzweil (Martin Landau), who explains that the four victims were already dead, and the bomb was allowed to detonate to destroy the evidence as to how they died. Mulder enlists Scully to travel with him to the morgue to examine the bodies. They learn that the bodies have suffered a complete cellular breakdown, not at all caused by the bomb. Mulder leaves Scully in the morgue to fly back to Dallas to investigate evidence left from the explosion. He urges Scully to join him, and she shares evidence that the bodies were infected with an alien virus. They travel to the boy's home, but find a brand-new park in place of the hole in which he fell. Unsure what to do next, they wind up following a team of tanker trucks to a massive cornfield surrounding two bright, glowing domes. When they infiltrate the domes, they find simply a large empty space. However, grates on the floor open up, and a massive swarm of thousands of bees chase the agents into the cornfield. Soon helicopters fly overhead, and the two make a harrowing escape back to Washington.

Upon their return, Mulder, finding the evidence disappearing before his eyes, unsuccessfully seeks help from Kurtzweil, while Scully attends her performance hearing, and learns that she is being transferred to Salt Lake City, Utah. She informs Mulder that she would rather resign from the FBI than be transferred. Mulder is devastated at the thought of not having Scully as a partner to help him uncover the truth, telling her, "I don't know if I want to do this alone. I don't know if I even can. And if I quit now, they win." The two have a tender moment (they lean towards each other, as though to kiss), until she is stung by a bee which had lodged itself under her shirt collar. She has an adverse reaction, and Mulder calls 911. However, when the ambulance arrives to transport her, the driver shoots Mulder in the head, and whisks Scully to an undisclosed location. Mulder awakens, (the bullet grazed his temple) and, with the help of The Lone Gunmen, sneaks out of the hospital. He is accosted by The Well-Manicured Man, who gives him Scully's location in Antarctica, along with a serum to combat the virus she is infected with. Well-Manicured Man then kills himself before his betrayal to the Syndicate is found out.

Mulder journeys to Antarctica to save Scully, in the process discovering a secret lab run by the Cigarette-Smoking Man and his colleague Strughold. The lab is destroyed just after they escape to the surface, when the alien ship lying dormant underneath comes back to life and leaves its underground port, zooming away into the sky. Only Mulder sees it go, as Scully is unconscious at the time.

Later, Mulder and Scully attend a hearing where their testimony is routinely ignored, and the evidence covered up. The only remaining proof of the whole ordeal is the bee that stung Scully, collected by The Lone Gunmen. She hands it over, cooly stating, "I don't believe the FBI currently has an investigative unit qualified to pursue the evidence at hand."

At another crop outpost in Tunisia, Strughold learns that the X-Files office has been reopened...
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