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TEUTONIC MYTH AND LEGEND

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Author Topic: TEUTONIC MYTH AND LEGEND  (Read 491 times)
Teutonic Knight
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« Reply #75 on: November 09, 2009, 01:33:55 am »

is found in South Uist. It was taken down from a minister thirty years ago by an Inspector of Schools, who related it to the writer as follows:--

The Fians (Féinne) were lying in a cave, each resting on his elbow, chin upon hand, self-absorbed, not asleep.

They heard the falling waters, and the storms went over them unheeded. . . . Thousands of years went past.
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Teutonic Knight
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« Reply #76 on: November 09, 2009, 01:34:26 am »

They were still resting there, musing, when one of them moved his elbow and said:--

"Och! och! 's mi tha sgith." (Och! och! it's me that's tired.)

Thousands of years went past. . . . They heard the falling waters, and the storms went over them unheeded.
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Teutonic Knight
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« Reply #77 on: November 09, 2009, 01:34:37 am »

Then a great Fian said sharply, "Mur a' sguir sibh dhe 'n chonnspoid seo, theid mi mach 's fagaidh mi an uaimh agaibh fhein." (If you do not stop this wrangling I'll go out, and leave the cave to yourselves.)

Thousands of years went past. . . . They heard the falling waters, and the storms went over them unheeded.
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Teutonic Knight
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« Reply #78 on: November 09, 2009, 01:34:45 am »

In various legends the movements of the "sleepers" (who do not sleep in Uist) were associated with sorrow and disaster or seasonal changes. Edward the Confessor had a vision, while sitting at a banquet in his palace at Westminster, in which he saw the Ephesian sleepers turning round. A messenger was sent to Ephesus, and it was found that they had turned from their right sides to their left. This was taken as a sign of approaching disaster, and was, in fact, associated with the miseries that Christendom endured from the Saracens. The seasonal reference survives in the St. Swithin's day belief.

p. xlvii
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« Reply #79 on: November 09, 2009, 01:35:04 am »

Various heroes lie asleep, including Charlemagne, Frederick of Barbarossa, William Tell in Switzerland, Brian Boroimhe in Ireland, and Arthur in Wales. The warning that when the sleepers leave the cave "the world will be upset" was transformed into the popular belief that certain heroes would issue forth in the hour of their country's direst need. The French peasants believed in the coming of Napoleon, as the Swiss did in the return of William Tell. During the Russo-Japanese war the peasantry of Russia were confident that General Skobeleff would hasten to Manchuria to lead the armies to victory. To this day there are many Highlanders who remain convinced that General Sir Hector Macdonald is not dead, but is waiting his hour of return. A similar belief attached to James IV, who fell at Flodden. So do "immemorial modes of thought" survive in the twentieth century from, perhaps, that remote Stone Age period when the fair-haired and blue-eyed "long-heads" spread from North Africa over the undivided lands of ancient Europe to mingle with earlier inhabitants and later "broad-heads" from Asia.
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« Reply #80 on: November 09, 2009, 01:35:31 am »

Footnotes

xxi:1 An English translation by R. B. Anderson was published in London in 1889, but is out of print.

xxi:2 Introduction to English translation of Saxo Grammaticus.--Nutt.

xxii:1 Eirikr Magnusson's.

xxxiii:1 In Scottish Gaelic, Fomhair and Famhair, pronounced "foo-ar" and "faa-har". The Fomorib (men of the sea) theory has long been abandoned by Prof. Rhys.

xxxiii:2 In Gaelic, Cailleach Mor.

xxxiii:3 In pre-Christian times witches were the friends of man, and helped him to combat against hags and giants.

xxxiv:1 In Old English the giants are "eotens".

xxxvii:1 In Ireland the "Milky Way" is "Lugh's chain". Lugh is the dawn-god, and grandson of the night-god.

xxxvii:2 Saga Library, Morris and Magnusson, Vol. I, 339.

xl:1 Beowulf, Clark Hall, Introduction, lix-lx.

xlii:1 Dietrich is the High German equivalent of Theoderic. Bern is Verona.

xliii:1 The western Hittites had a storm-god, named Tarku, at the head of their pantheon. The eastern Hittites called him Teshup. This god is a warrior who holds in one hand a hammer, and in the other three wriggling flashes of lightning. The hammer is the symbol of fertility. Thor brings his goats back to life by waving his hammer over them.

xliv:1 This calculation is according to the legends.

xlv:1 See Finn and His Warrior Band.

xlv:2 The dog also figures in a "Seven Sleepers" legend in North Afghanistan.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/tml/tml05.htm
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