Atlantis Online
December 05, 2019, 11:05:39 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Secrets of ocean birth laid bare 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/5191384.stm#graphic
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Are You on the Arrest List? CNN Explores Fusion Centers

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Are You on the Arrest List? CNN Explores Fusion Centers  (Read 73 times)
Keith Ranville
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387

*


« on: November 08, 2009, 02:58:45 pm »

Video and Transcript of CNN reporting on the InauguRell Arrest debacle where I was targeted and jailed for speaking my mind.



This investigation into Homeland Security Fusion Centers aired on CNN on September 30, 2009 during the morning show, and again on October 3 and 4, 2009 during Gerri Willis' show "Your Bottom Line."

 

Here's the transcript, from CNN:


KEN KRAYESKE, ACTIVIST: I drop the bike...

GERRI WILLIS, CNN CORREPSONDENT: It was the morning of Connecticut Governor Jodi Rell's inaugural parade.

KRAYESKE: ... pulled out my camera, and I just shoot Governor Rell about 23 shots.

WILLIS: Moments later, Ken Krayeske was stopped by Hartford police officers, handcuffed, arrested and jailed.

KRAYESKE: I said what did I do? They said you shouldn't have been making those threats.

WILLIS: Local police have been on the look out for him after state police gave out a security bulletin with his photo on it. Officials wouldn't comment pending a civil lawsuit. The court documents reveal state police were alarmed by Krayeske's blog posts. "Who is going to protest the inaugural ball with me?" And, "No need to make nice."

KRAYESKE: Why do I have to be nice to a political figure simply because she won an election? WILLIS: Police began digging for information, mining public and commercial data bases. They learned Krayeske had been a Green Party campaign director, had protested the gubernatorial debate and had once been convicted for civil disobedience. He had no history of violence.

Law Professor Danielle Citron says police aren't supposed to gather information on citizens who are suspected of a crime.

DANIELLE CITRON, PRIVACY EXPERT: We're interested in someone because they are an advocate for a Green Party candidate and we think they are suspicious because they want to get other people to protest someone's ideas but not because they think there is a true threat to their lives. I think that's just troubling.

WILLIS: Today, law enforcement collects and shares more information than ever. And much of it goes on at state intelligence centers called fusion centers.

Fusion centers were started after 9/11 to help federal, state and law enforcement connect the dots and stop a terrorist attack. The Department of Homeland Security says they are a critical tool in keeping the nation safe.

JANET NAPOLITANO, U.S. HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY: In a typical fusion center an FBI agent might be sitting next to a state highway patrol officer. They don't merely share space. They share data bases and techniques.

WILLIS: But what's going into those data bases has critics worried. The ACLU says there's evidence that some fusion centers have targeted Muslim groups and peace activists for surveillance.

MIKE GERMAN, ACLU: Collecting the information about people that has no relevance to whether or not they are breaking the law.

RICH KELLY, DIRECTOR, REGIONAL OPERATIONS INTELLIGENCE CENTER: We're in the center of the analysis element.

WILLIS: The director of New Jersey's Fusion Center says law enforcement works hard to balance national security with individual privacy.

KELLY: We in law enforcement and certainly in fusion centers are very attuned to the bill of rights. We're not in the business of investigating first amendment -- or constitutionally-protected rights.

WILLIS: But Ken Krayeske thinks that police in his town crossed the line.

KRAYESKE: The police did not determine the difference between who was dangerous and who was merely expressing protected constitutional -- their constitutionally protected viewpoints.

  http://www.the40yearplan.com/CNN_on_Fusion_Centers.php
Report Spam   Logged

Keith Ranville
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387

*


« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2009, 03:01:36 pm »

Sept. 30, 7:25am: CNN Investigates Fusion Centers, InauguRell Arrest

Tune in to CNN tomorrow, Wednesday, September 30 at 7:25 a.m, EST, 8:25 a.m. EST and again during the 9 and 10 a.m. hours to see a 2-minute segment investigating the role of FBI and Homeland Security fusion centers.

 

A CNN producer and photojournalist traveled to Hartford and interviewed me at the spot where I was arrested on January 3, 2007 for taking photos, and we discussed exactly what transpired that day. For more information about the unlawful arrest, go here.

 

Fusion centers, where federal, state and local law enforcement agencies combine information to "protect" America, remain a vital part of the homeland security scheme. Just recently, the Department of Homeland Security announced "an initiative to grant select state and major urban area fusion center personnel access to classified terrorism-related information residing in DoD's classified network."

 

From the same Sept. 14, 2009 press release:

 

    "This initiative reflects the federal government's strong commitment to improve information sharing with our state, local, and tribal partners," said DHS Acting Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis Bart R. Johnson. "Fusion centers are a critical part of our national security enterprise, and this new tool enables federal agencies to share information with these partners while utilizing our advanced technical capabilities for secure information sharing."

I'm not convinced that Fusion Centers work, based on my experiences. But what do I know? Tune in to CNN and see what the network has to say about them. Hopefully, video will follow.

 

The ACLU hasn't liked fusion centers since a whole month before I was arrested.
Report Spam   Logged
Keith Ranville
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2387

*


« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2009, 03:19:23 pm »

This means your personal opinion you post on the internet on a controversial subject concerning a federal government issue that you may agree or disagree with, will be used against you at a later date.

Paranoia or a government conspiracy against society?

 Huh 
« Last Edit: November 08, 2009, 03:49:55 pm by Keith Ranville » Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy