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Month in Space: October 2009

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Uriel
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« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2009, 11:41:59 pm »



Where stars are born

An infrared image from the European Space Agency's Herschel probe, released Oct. 2, shows clouds of dust and gas in our own Milky Way galaxy. Scientists say the clouds shroud hordes of newborn stars. The image is a composite of light captured simultaneously by two of Herschel's three instruments -- its photodetector array camera and spectrometer, and its spectral and photometric imaging receiver.
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Uriel
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« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2009, 11:43:03 pm »



Two-tone moon

Dark dust coats half of a Saturnian moon named Iapetus, as seen in this photo captured by the Cassini orbiter in September 2007. In the Oct. 8 issue of Nature, researchers suggested that the source of the dust was a nearly invisible ring of debris kicked off from another moon, Phoebe. The ring starts about 3.7 million miles away from Saturn and extends outward another 7.4 million miles.
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Uriel
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« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2009, 11:44:16 pm »



Reaching out ... on Mars

NASA's Spirit rover stretches out its robotic arm over Martian terrain in a photo taken on Oct. 11. The bright soil in the left half of the image is the loose, fluffy material in which the rover has been mired for the past six months.
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Uriel
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« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2009, 11:45:20 pm »



Clash of galaxies

An image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows two galaxies merging into one beautiful mess known as NGC 2623. The picture, based on data acquired in 2007, was released on Oct. 13
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Uriel
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« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2009, 11:46:29 pm »



Layers upon layers

Deposits of light-colored material lie atop sand dunes in the Noctis Labyrinthus formation on Mars, as shown in this picture from the high-resolution camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Readings from another instrument, known as CRISM, suggest that the material contains iron-bearing sulfates and clay minerals. The photo was released on Oct. 7.
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Uriel
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« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2009, 11:48:07 pm »



Butterfly in space

Colorful jets stretch out into space from the planetary nebula NGC 6302, also known as the Butterfly Nebula or the Bug Nebula. The image, captured on July 27 and released on Sept. 9, was one of the first taken by the Hubble Space Telescope since its overhaul in May.
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Uriel
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« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2009, 11:49:09 pm »



Light labor

Discovery spacewalker John "Danny" Olivas works in the bright light reflected by the International Space Station's mirrorlike surfaces and gold-colored solar arrays on Sept. 1. Earth's bright horizon is visible in the background. During the shuttle Discovery's mission, spacewalkers replaced the station's coolant tank.
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Solar Explosion
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« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2009, 12:42:50 am »

Great stuff, here is some more:
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Solar Explosion
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« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2009, 12:43:03 am »



Dance of the galaxies

An arrangement of galaxies known as Stephan's Quintet sparkles in a Hubble Space Telescope image released on Sept. 9. Four of the galaxies are interacting in a gravitational dance - but the fifth galaxy, at upper left, is actually much closer to us and just happens to be in the same line of sight.
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« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2009, 12:49:07 am »



Lines in the (Martian) sand

Whirlwinds have left behind subtle dark tracks that are visible in this orbital image of a Martian dune field. The picture was taken by a high-resolution camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in August and released on Sept. 16.
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Solar Explosion
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« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2009, 12:55:29 am »



Lines in the ice

A high-resolution image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, captured in April and released in September, shows a sawtooth pattern in the Red Planet's carbon dioxide ice.
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Solar Explosion
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« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2009, 01:04:08 am »



Dust Down Under

A thick plume of dust stretches from northern Queensland in Australia toward New Zealand in this Sept. 24 picture, taken by an imaging instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The blue-green Great Barrier Reef is visible beneath the plume, near the top of the image where the tan dust mingles with gray-brown smoke from wildfires
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Solar Explosion
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« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2009, 01:09:05 am »



A star is born

An eerie pillar of starbirth in the Carina Nebula rises from a sea of greenish cosmic clouds in an image captured by the Huibble Space Telescope's brand-new Wide Field Camera 3. The image is part of a series released Sept. 9 to celebrate Hubble's return to full operation.
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