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The Story of the Champions of the Round Table

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Author Topic: The Story of the Champions of the Round Table  (Read 1102 times)
Karyn Rew
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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2009, 01:12:18 pm »

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Sir Launcelot of the Lake.
 front
 
Head Piece--Table of Contents.
 vii
 
Tail Piece--Table of Contents.
 xiii
 
Head Piece--List of Illustrations.
 xv
 
Tail Piece--List of Illustrations.
 xviii
 
The Lady Nymue beareth away Launcelot into the Lake.
 2
 
Head Piece--Prologue.
 3
 
Tail Piece--Prologue.
 10
 
p. xvi
 
 
Sir Launcelot greets Queen Guinevere.
 12
 
Head Piece--The Story of Launcelot.
 13
 
Sir Lionel of Britain.
 26
 
Queen Morgana appears unto Sir Launcelot.
 34
 
Sir Launcelot doeth battle with Sir Turquine.
 44
 
Sir Launcelot sits with Sir Hilaire and Croisette.
 54
 
Sir Launcelot and Elouise the Fair.
 64
 
Sir Launcelot climbs to catch the lady's falcon.
 74
 
Sir Launcelot takes the armor of Sir Kay.
 86
 
Tail Piece--The Story of Launcelot.
 96
 
Sir Tristram of Lyonesse.
 100
 
Head Piece--Prologue.
 101
 
Tail Piece--Prologue.
 104
 
Tristram succors the Lady Moeya.
 106
 
Head Piece--The Story of Sir Tristram and the Lady Belle Isoult.
 107
 
King Mark of Cornwall.
 114
 
The Lady Belle Isoult.
 124
 
p. xvii
 
 
The Queen of Ireland seeks to slay Sir Tristram.
 132
 
Sir Tristram harpeth before King Mark.
 146
 
Sir Tristram sits with Sir Launcelot.
 160
 
Tail Piece.
 168
 
Belle Isoult and Sir Tristram drink the love draught.
 170
 
Tail Piece--The Story of Sir Tristram and the Lady Belle Isoult.
 182
 
Sir Lamorack of Gales.
 184
 
Head Piece--The Story of Sir Tristram and Sir Lamorack.
 185
 
Sir Tristram cometh to ye castle of Sir Nabon.
 196
 
Sir Lamorack herds the swine of Sir Nabon.
 208
 
Sir Tristram assaults King Mark.
 220
 
Head Piece--The Madness of Sir Tristram.
 221
 
Sir Kay and the Forest Madman.
 230
 
Sir Tristram leaps into ye Sea.
 242
 
King Mark broods mischief.
 252
 
Tail Piece--The Madness of Sir Tristram.
 258
 
p. xviii
 
 
Sir Percival of Gates.
 260
 
Head Piece--Prologue.
 261
 
The Lady Yvette the Fair.
 268
 
Sir Percival and Sir Lamorack ride together.
 280
 
Sir Percival overcometh ye Enchantress Vivien.
 290
 
The Demoiselle Blanchefleur.
 302
 
Sir Kay interrupts ye meditations of Sir Percival.
 316
 
Tail Piece--The Book of Sir Percival.
 328
 
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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2009, 01:12:46 pm »

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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2009, 01:13:15 pm »



The Lady Nymue beareth Launcelot into the Lake



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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2009, 01:13:59 pm »



Prologue.
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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2009, 01:14:13 pm »

IT hath already been set forth in print in a volume written by me concerning the adventures of King Arthur when he first became king, how there were certain lesser kings who favored him and were friendly allies with him, and how there were certain others of the same sort who were his enemies.

Among those who were his friends was King ran of Benwick, who was an exceedingly noble lord of high estate and great honor, and who was of a lineage so exalted that it is not likely that there was anyone in the world who was of a higher strain.

Now, upon a certain time, King Ban of Benwick fell into great trouble; for there came against him a very powerful enemy, to wit, King Claudas of Scotland. King Claudas brought unto Benwick a huge Of King Ban and his misfortunes.
army of knights and lords, and these sat down before the Castle of Trible with intent to take that strong fortress and destroy it.

This noble Castle of Trible was the chiefest and the strongest place of defence in all King Ban's dominions, wherefore he had intrenched himself there with all of his knights and with his Queen, hight Helen, and his youngest son, hight Launcelot.

Now this child, Launcelot; was dearer to Queen Helen than all the world

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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2009, 01:15:43 pm »

besides, for he was not only large of limb but so extraordinarily beautiful of face that I do not believe an angel from Paradise could have been more beautiful than he. He had been born with a singular birth-mark upon his shoulder, which birth-mark had the appearance as of a golden star enstamped upon the skin; wherefore, because of this, the Queen would say: "Launcelot, by reason of that star upon thy shoulder I believe that thou shalt be the star of our house and that thou shalt shine with such remarkable glory that all the world shall behold thy lustre and shall marvel thereat for all time to come." So the Queen took extraordinary delight in Launcelot and loved him to the very core of her heart--albeit she knew not, at the time she spake, how that prophecy of hers concerning the star was to fall so perfectly true.

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Karyn Rew
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« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2009, 01:15:58 pm »

Now, though King Ban thought himself very well defended at his Castle of Trible, yet King Claudas brought so terribly big an army against that place that it covered the entire plain. A great many battles were fought under the walls of the castle, but ever King Claudas waxed greater and stronger, and King Ban's party grew weaker and more fearful.

So by and by things came to such a pass that King Ban bethought him of King Arthur, and he said to himself: "I will go to my lord the King and beseech help and aid from him, for he will certainly give it me. Nor will I trust any messenger in this affair other than myself; for I myself will go to King Arthur and will speak to him with my own lips."

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« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2009, 01:16:11 pm »

Having thus bethought him, he sent for Queen Helen to come into his privy closet and he said to her: "My dear love, nothing remaineth for me but to go unto the court of King Arthur and King Ban bethinks him of King Arthur.
beseech him to lend his powerful aid in this extremity of our misfortunes; nor will I trust any messenger in this affair but myself. Now, this castle is no place for thee, when I am away, therefore, when I go upon this business, I will take thee and Launcelot with me, and I will leave you both in safety at King Arthur's court with our other son, Sir Ector, until this war be ended and done." And to these Queen Helen lent her assent.

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« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2009, 01:16:22 pm »

So King Ban summoned to him the seneschal of the castle, who was named Sir Malydor le Brun, and said to him: "Messire, I go hence to-night by a secret pass, with intent to betake me unto King Arthur, and to beseech his aid in this extremity. Moreover, I shall take with me my lady and the young child Launcelot, to place them within the care of King Arthur during these dolorous wars. But besides these, I will take no other one with me but only my favorite esquire, Foliot. Now I charge thee, sir, to hold this castle in my behalf with all thy might and main, and yield it not to our

p. 5

enemies upon any extremity; for I believe I shall in a little while return with sufficient aid from King Arthur to compass the relief of this place."

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« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2009, 01:16:34 pm »

So when night had fallen very dark and still, King Ban, and Queen Helen, and the young child Launcelot, and the esquire Foliot left the town privily by means of a postern gate. Thence they went by a King Ban with Queen Helen and Launcelot escape from Trible.
secret path, known only to a very few, that led down a steep declivity of rocks, with walls of rock upon either side that were very high indeed, and so they came out in safety beyond the army of King Claudas and into the forest of the valley below. And the forest lay very still and solemn and dark in the silence of the nighttime.

Having thus come out in safety into the forest, that small party journeyed on with all celerity that they were able to achieve until, some little time before dawn, they came to where was a lake of water in an open meadow of the forest. Here they rested for a little while, for Queen Helen had fallen very weary with the rough and hasty journey which they had traveled.

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« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2009, 01:16:44 pm »

Now whilst they sat there resting, Foliot spake of a sudden, saying unto King Ban: "Lord, what is that light that maketh the sky so bright yonderways?" Then King Ban looked a little and presently said: Foliot seeth a light.
"Methinks it must be the dawn that is breaking." "Lord," quoth Foliot, "that cannot very well be; for that light in the sky lieth in the south, whence we have come, and not in the east, where the sun should arise."

Then King Ban's heart misgave him, and his soul was shaken with a great trouble. "Foliot," he said, "I believe that you speak sooth and that that light bodes very ill for us all." Then he said: "Stay here for a little and I will go and discover what that light may be." Therewith he mounted his horse and rode away in the darkness.

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« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2009, 01:17:02 pm »

Now there was a very high hill near-by where they were, and upon the top of the hill was an open platform of rock whence a man could see a great way off in every direction. So King Ban went to this place, King Ban beholdeth the burning of Trible.
and, when he had come there, he cast his eyes in the direction of the light and he straightway beheld with a manner of terror that the light came from Trible; and then, with that terror still growing greater at his heart, he beheld that the town and the castle were all in one great flame of fire.

When King Ban saw this he sat for a while upon his horse like one turned into a stone. Then, after a while, he cried out in a great voice: "Woe! Woe! Woe is me!" And then he cried out still in a very loud voice, "Certes, God hath deserted me entirely."

p. 6

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« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2009, 01:17:11 pm »

Therewith a great passion of grief took hold upon him and shook him like to a leaf, and immediately after that he felt that something brake within him with a very sharp and bitter pain, and he wist that it was his heart that had broken. So being all alone there upon the hilltop, and in the perfect stillness of the night, he cried out, "My heart! My heart!" The death of King Ban.
And therewith, the shadows of death coming upon him, he could not sit any longer upon his horse, but fell down upon the ground. And he knew very well that death was nigh him, so, having no cross to pray upon, he took two blades of grass and twisted them into that holy sign, and he kissed it and prayed unto it that God would forgive him his sins. So he died all alone upon that hilltop.

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« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2009, 01:17:21 pm »

Meanwhile, Queen Helen and Foliot sat together waiting for him to return and presently they heard the sound of his horse's hoofs coming down that rocky path. Then Queen Helen said: "Foliot, methinks my lord cometh." So in a little came the horse with the empty saddle. When Foliot beheld that he said: "Lady, here meseems is great trouble come to us, for methinks something hath befallen my lord, and that he is in sore travail, for here is his horse without him."

Then it seemed to Queen Helen as though the spirit of life suddenly went away from her, for she foresaw what had befallen. So she arose like one in a dream, and, speaking very quietly, she said: "Foliot, take me whither my lord went awhile since!" To this Foliot said: "Lady, wait until the morning, which is near at hand, for it is too dark for you to go thitherward at this present." Whereunto the Lady Helen replied: "Foliot, I cannot wait, for if I stay here and wait I believe I shall go mad." Upon this, Foliot did not try to persuade her any more but made ready to take her whither she would go.

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« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2009, 01:17:34 pm »

Now the young child Launcelot was then asleep upon the Queen's knees, wherefore she took her cloak and wrapped the child in it and laid him very gently upon the ground, so that he did not wake. Then she mounted upon her palfrey and Foliot led the palfrey up the hill whither King Ban had gone a short time since,

When they came to that place of open rocks above told of, they found King Ban lying very quiet and still upon the ground and with a countenance of great peace. For I believe of a surety that God had forgiven him all The Lady Helen findeth the King.
his sins, and he would now suffer no more because of the cares and the troubles of this life. Thus Queen Helen found him, and finding him she made no moan or outcry of any kind, only she looked for a long while into his dead face, which she could see very plainly now, because that the dawn had already broken. And by

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