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CIA Used Gun, Drill in Interrogation

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Lighthizer
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« Reply #60 on: September 06, 2009, 01:25:40 am »

Obama created task forces to study U.S. policy and practices on handling terrorism captives shortly after taking office. Obama has vowed to close the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison by next year, hoping to free those prisoners against whom there is no case, to transfer others to the custody of other countries and to put still others on trial, ending their condition of limbo in the U.S. brig.

The new group and new directives to rely soley on the Army Field Manual when interrogating prisoners is an attempt by the administration to separate itself from allegation that the Bush administration tortured some prisoners. While the practice of waterboarding - simulated drowning - has been banned, the field manual directives would also end the practice of subjecting prisoners to loud music for long periods and sleep deprivation.

Subjecting prisoner abuse cases to a new review and possible prosecution could expose CIA employees and agency contractors to criminal prosecution for the alleged mistreatment of terror suspects in the years after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Holder reportedly reacted with disgust when he first read accounts of prisoner abuse earlier this year in a classified version of the IG report.

The Justice report is said to reveal how interrogators conducted mock executions and threatened at least one man with a gun and a power drill. Threatening a prisoner with death violates U.S. anti-torture laws.

A federal judge has ordered the IG report made public Monday, in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union.

A CIA spokesman, Paul Gimigliano, told the Times that the recommendation to reopen the cases had not been sent to the agency.

The accounts of the White House-supervised interrogation unit and the ethics recommendation to Holder were first reported, respectively,  by The Washington Post and The New York Times.
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« Reply #61 on: September 06, 2009, 01:25:54 am »

New details emerge of CIA interrogators' treatment of prisoners

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-cia-report25-2009aug25,0,4353125.story
By Greg Miller August 25, 2009
The Obama administration releases parts of a 2004 report on the CIA's post-9/11 interrogation program. Prisoners were choked to the point of passing out and their families were threatened, it says.

Reporting from Washington - The Obama administration disclosed new cases of alleged abuse in the CIA's interrogation program today, issuing a report that described how prisoners were choked to the point of passing out and threatened with harm to their immediate families.

The newly declassified report by the CIA's inspector general also reveals that agency personnel were nervous almost from the inception of the interrogation program that one day they would face prosecution in U.S. or international courts.

The likelihood of that outcome increased today as Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. appointed a prosecutor to review a collection of CIA cases, setting the stage for a probe that could lead to criminal charges for CIA personnel.

The move was largely driven by the disturbing details contained in the 2004 inspector general report, a document that sent ripples of anxiety through the government when it was first issued but became available for public view -- at least in part -- for the first time today. Large sections of the report remained blacked out.

The document includes fresh details that had not been previously disclosed. Among them are that top Al Qaeda prisoners were told that their family members faced harm if detainees didn't yield information.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #62 on: September 06, 2009, 01:26:31 am »

"We could get your mother in here," a CIA interrogator told Abd al Rahim al Nashiri, the man authorities believe plotted the bombing of the U.S. destroyer Cole, according to the report. The threat was meant to prey on fears in Middle East circles that prisoners would be made to witness the sexual abuse of their immediate family members.

Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, suspected of masterminding the Sept. 11 attacks, was told, "We're going to kill your children," the report said.

The document provides the most extensive examination to date of CIA conduct in a constellation of secret prisons that the agency set up after Sept. 11. In some cases, the report praises how the prisons were run, and acknowledges that the program provided intelligence that let to other captures and the disruption of planned attacks.

But the report also faults CIA personnel -- from the bottom ranks to the top -- for failures in oversight and breakdowns during interrogations. It also sounded a warning that what the agency was doing could be out of step with the nation's values and commitments.

The techniques being used "are inconsistent with the public policy positions that the United States has taken regarding human rights," the report said, citing the anxieties of case officers convinced that they would one day be held to account.

"One officer expressed concern that one day, agency officers will wind up on some 'wanted list' to appear before the World Court for war crimes stemming from activities" in the secret prison sites, the report said.

Many of the incidents described in the document were previously disclosed. The inspector general expresses the deepest misgivings, for example, with how frequently CIA interrogators were subjecting prisoners to the simulated drowning method known as waterboarding.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #63 on: September 06, 2009, 01:26:47 am »

When pressed on why the CIA was using larger volumes of water than had been used in U.S. military training, one of the psychologists overseeing the program replied that was because unlike the exercises for American soldiers, the interrogation of Al Qaeda prisoners was "for real."  What military training?  This **** isn't taught in boot camp and this suggests that all military personnel engage in this!

But 23 pages of the report, much of it apparently dealing with the agency's use of waterboarding, remained redacted, appearing as page after page of blacked-out text.

Among the new disclosures was that the CIA in at least one 2002 instance employed a method known as "pressure points" -- wrapping hands around a prisoner's carotid artery. The interrogator "watched his eyes to the point that the detainee would nod and start to pass out" before being shaken awake, the report stated.

President Obama outlawed the CIA's use of so-called enhanced interrogation techniques in January, and ordered the agency's secret prison facilities closed. Obama this week approved the creation of a new interrogation program, drawing on experts from the FBI and other agencies -- all required to abide by the strict interrogation guidelines in the U.S. Army Field Manual.

CIA Director Leon E. Panetta issued a statement to the agency's workforce today saying that the release of the details was "in many ways an old story. The outlines of prior interrogation practices, and many of the details, are public already. . . . For the CIA now, the challenge is not the battles of yesterday, but those of today and tomorrow."

greg.miller@latimes.com

Copyright © 2009, The Los Angeles Times
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #64 on: September 06, 2009, 01:27:31 am »

White House to supervise High-Value Interrogation Group
Monday, 24 August 2009 18:06




BY MICHAEL BOWMAN VOA NEWS

WASHINGTON — The White House says it will directly supervise a new unit that is being set up to interrogate high value terror detainees. The announcement came Monday as the Obama administration named a federal prosecutor who will investigate past cases of detainee mistreatment.

For years, the Central Intelligence Agency stood at the forefront of U.S. efforts to extract information from terror suspects in the post-9/11 era. That role is changing, according to White House spokesman Bill Burton.

"The president, at the consensus recommendation of his inter-agency task force on interrogations and detainees did put in place a new group, the High-Value Interrogation Group, which will be housed at the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigations]," said Bill Burton. "And it will bring together all the different elements of the intelligence community to get the best intelligence possible."

Burton spoke in Massachusetts, where President Barack Obama is on a weeklong vacation.

Administration officials say the CIA will continue to take part in interrogations, but that an FBI official will direct the effort with oversight by the National Security Council, which reports directly to the president.

President Obama came to office promising to outlaw torture in U.S. intelligence gathering. But just what constitutes torture has been a matter of debate in Washington. The Bush administration strenuously defended so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques" like sleep deprivation to obtain information from detainees, and admitted to harsher treatment, like the simulated drowning technique called water boarding, that was used in the immediate aftermath of the September 11 terror attacks.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #65 on: September 06, 2009, 01:27:51 am »

The Obama administration has made no move to prosecute former high ranking Bush administration officials for torture, but has left open the possibility of charging anyone who exceeded Bush-era guidelines on the treatment of terror suspects.

White House spokesman Burton says President Obama's view of the matter has not changed.

"He [Obama] does agree with the attorney general that anyone who conducted actions that had been sanctioned [by the Bush administration] should not be prosecuted," he said. "But ultimately, the decisions on who is investigated and who is prosecuted are up to the attorney general. The president thinks that Eric Holder, who he appointed as a very independent attorney general, should make those decisions."

Attorney General Holder later selected federal prosecutor John Durham to investigate prisoner abuse cases. Durham is already probing the destruction of dozens of videotapes of CIA interrogations that could have shed additional light on U.S. treatment of terror suspects.

Meanwhile, the Justice Department released a declassified CIA report from 2004 detailing past interrogations of terror suspects and the techniques that were used. In one case, a U.S. interrogator reportedly threatened to kill the children of detained al Qaida mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed if new terrorist attacks were launched on the United States.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #66 on: September 06, 2009, 01:28:08 am »

For some, the scrutiny and publicizing of past intelligence operations serves no purpose but to aid America's enemies. Former Vice President Dick Cheney spoke at length on the subject at a Washington forum in May.

"From the beginning of the [interrogation] program, there was only one focused and all-important purpose: we sought and we obtained specific information on terrorist plans," said Dick Cheney. "And to call this a program of torture is to libel [denigrate] the dedicated professionals who have saved American lives. After the most lethal and devastating terrorist attack ever, 7.5 years without a repeat is not a record to be rebuked and scorned, much less criminalized."

The Obama administration says the United States will follow interrogation guidelines set forth in the U.S. Army Field Manual, which conform with U.S. and international law.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #67 on: September 06, 2009, 01:28:25 am »

‘Prolonged diapering’ revealed as ‘enhanced interrogation technique’
http://rawstory.com/08/news/2009/08/25/prolonged-diapering-revealed/
By Stephen C. Webster Published: August 25, 2009


A CIA inspector general report released Monday in a less-redacted version reveals that “prolonged diapering” was on the agency’s list of approved “enhanced” interrogation techniques. The revelation is in Appendix F, included in the IG’s report on page 149, as part of a set of guidelines for “medical and psychological support to detainee interrogations.” The document is dated Sept. 4, 2003.

According to American Civil Liberties Union staff attorney Jameel Jaffer, this is the first document released publicly which categorizes diapering as an enhanced interrogation technique. Another ACLU source told RAW STORY that while they are familiar with the use of diapers on clients being transported, this is “news to us.”

The document in Appendix F of the IG report reads: “Captured terrorists turned over to the CIA may be subjected to a wide range of legally sanctioned techniques, all of which are used on U.S. military personnel in SERE training programs. They are designed to psychologically ‘dislocate’ the detainee, maximizing his feelings of vulnerability and helplessness, and reduce or eliminate his will to resist our efforts to obtain critical intelligence.” The list, organized in “ascending degree of intensity,” says the following were approved standard measures “without physical or substantial psychological pressure”:

Shaving Stripping Diapering Hooding Isolation White noise or loud music (at a decibel level that will not damage hearing) Continuous light or darkness Uncomfortably cool environment Restricted diet, including reduced caloric intake (sufficient to maintain general health) Water dousing Sleep deprivation (up to 72 hours)
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« Reply #68 on: September 06, 2009, 01:28:41 am »

A second list of “enhanced” measures “with physical or psychological pressure beyond the above” reads:

Attention grasp Facial hold Insult (facial) slap Abdominal slap Prolonged diapering Sleep deprivation (over 72 hours) Stress positions –On knees, body slanted forward or backward –Leaning with forehead on wall Walling Cramped confinement Waterboard

The appearance of diapering on the list seems to contradict an Office of Legal Counsel memo (PDF link) written by former Bush administration lawyer Steven Bradbury in 2005. Bradbury claimed diapering “is not used for the purpose of humiliating the detainee, and it is not considered to be an interrogation technique.” However, in the appendix of the IG’s report, “prolonged diapering” was on the list of approved interrogation techniques (P. 150). While diapering is included on page 149 as a standard technique — along with shaving, stripping, hooding and isolation — it is also listed as one of a number of “enhanced measures,” with an intensity level below waterboarding, but above the “abdominal slap.”

The report does not define “prolonged” as it applies to diapering, nor does it confirm whether it was used on any prisoners. It is also unknown when exactly diapering was authorized as an EIT, and whether or not the order was rescinded before the 2005 Bradbury memo. Describing standard diapering, Bradbury wrote, “The detainee’s skin condition is monitored and diapers are changed as needed so that the detainee does not remain in a soiled diaper.” Bradbury is one of three former Bush administration attorneys — including John Yoo and Jay Bybee — whose legal memos are being probed by the Justice Department’s Office of Professional Responsibility. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is reportedly in the process of appointing a special prosecutor to investigate instances of CIA detainee abuse.
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Lighthizer
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« Reply #69 on: September 06, 2009, 01:28:58 am »

Spencer Ackerman, reporting for the Washington Independent, speculates that “prolonged diapering” could be the “eleventh” EIT.

“The 2004 CIA inspector general’s report on torture says clearly that in 2002, the CIA proposed to the Justice Department the use of eleven “enhanced interrogation techniques,”’ Ackerman writes. “Ten of them got the approval of the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel in August 2002 in the infamous Jay Bybee/John Yoo memo declassified by the Obama administration in April: the attention grasp; walling; the facial hold; the facial or insult slap; cramped confinement; insects; wall standing; stress positions; sleep deprivation; the waterboard. But what happened to the eleventh?”

Quoting the memo, he writes, “The Agency eliminated one proposed technique — [REDACTED] — after learning from DoJ that this could delay the legal review.”

“But an appendix to the report written by former CIA Director George Tenet gives an indication as to what that eleventh technique was — and says that it’s permissible,” Ackerman continues. “Take a look at Appendix E, Tenet’s January 28, 2003 memorandum on guidelines for both ’standard’ and ‘enhanced’ interrogations. Tenet’s list of ‘enhanced’ techniques, you’ll notice, number eleven:

These techniques are, [sic] the attention grasp, walling, the facial hold, the facial slap (insult slap), the abdominal slap, cramped confinement, wall standing, stress positions, sleep deprivation beyond 72 hours, the use of diapers for prolonged periods, the use of harmless insects, the water board, and such techniques as may be specifically approved pursuant to paragraph 4 below.

Ackerman adds, “All the others on Tenet’s list were approved by the Office of Legal Counsel in August of 2002. But that diapering technique was never approved by the Justice Department. Tenet considered ‘the use of diapers for limited periods (generally not to exceed 72 hours)’ to be a ’standard’ technique, as I blogged earlier. But it’s at least conceivable that the Justice Department would have thought reviewing prolonged diapering would have delayed the 2002 review, since the humiliation and health issues of forcing someone to remain in their own filth for over three days raise serious legal issues.”
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« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2009, 01:29:43 am »

CIA IG Report Question of the Morning
http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2009/08/cia-ig-report-question-morning
— By Nick Baumann | Tue August 25, 2009 6:54 AM PST


Lots of people have highlighted this passage from the 2004 CIA Inspector General's report:

Glenn Greenwald has a good rundown of some of the other most damning passages. Here's what I'm wondering: which country is "widely believed" to include "sexually abusing female relatives in front of the detainee" as part of its interrogation practices? And do we send people there for torture?
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« Reply #71 on: September 06, 2009, 01:31:02 am »

Medieval Torture

During the Middle Ages, torture was a very common way to punish offenders. Following are the most common torture devices used during the Middle Ages. Viewer discretion is advised.

Introduction - Read the introduction to medieval torture before heading to the torture instruments.

Judas Cradle - The Judas Cradle is a very painful torture. The victim was seated on a triangular-shaped seat where he or she was slowly impaled.

Coffin Torture - The coffin torture - a very cruel medieval device where the victim was locked for hours or longer.

The Brazen Bull - The brazen bull was a terrible torture device used in ancient Greece and throughout the Middle Ages.

The Rack Torture - The rack is commonly referred as the most painful medieval torture of them all.

The Water Torture - There were many ways to punish a victim with the use of water. This article explains the most common forms of such torture.

Exposure - A terrible torture that was often deadly. The exposure was a method used all around medieval Europe. The sentence depended on the crime.

The Chair of Torture - A striking instrument, the Chair was widely used throughout medieval Europe and beyond. It's origins are not clear, but the truth remains: This is one of the most painful and psychologically striking tortures ever devised by the human mind.

The Pear of Anguish - A very painful torture applied almost exclusively on witches, liars, blasphemers and homosexuals.

The Rat Torture - Rats were used for torture. They were free, available and painful if known how to use.

The Breast Ripper - A very cruel form of torture was the Breast Ripper. A variant, The Spider, was similarly painful and frequently fatal.

The Head Crusher - The head crusher was a psychologically striking instrument that was mainly used to extract confessions.

Saw Torture - The Saw was a humiliating and painful torture available everywhere.

The Virgin of Nuremberg (The Maiden) - The Maiden, also known as the Virgin of Nuremberg, was a torture device that consisted of a coffin with the face of a maiden full of spikes on every wall.

The Spanish Tickler - A terrible torture used to tear a victim's flesh apart. It was commonly used in Spain.

Garrotte Torture - The Garrotte was mostly used for executions and was very frequently used in Spain, hence its name.

Flagellation (Whipping) - Describes the act of flagellation or whipping. Its use was very common in Ancient Rome, but it was stil a favorite form of punishment during the Middle Ages.

The Wheel Torture (Breaking Wheel) - The Wheel torture was a very painful form of capital punishment. Death could be prolonged to a day or more.
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« Reply #72 on: September 06, 2009, 01:31:19 am »

Foot Roasting - Foot roasting was used in the Middle Ages to extract confessions. The Templar Knights, among many other orders, were tortured with this same method.

Burning at the Stake - Being burned at the stake was a terrible way to die. It could take several hours for death to occur and the causes of death were diverse.

Thumbscrew Torture - A painful torture mostly used to extract confessions before moving to more painful torture methods.

The Heretics Fork - A painful torture used to restrain a victim. It was used throughout the Middle Ages, but it reached its peak during the Spanish Inquisition.

Flaying Torture - A very old and painful method that consists of "skinning" a person alive.

Lead Sprinkler - The lead sprinkler was used to torture victims by pouring molten metals in different parts of their body.

Knee Splitter - Used for destroying body parts, the knee splitter was a terrifying torture device that could even bring death.

The Spanish Spider - A variant of the breast ripper, the Spanish Spider is an instrument capable of mutilating a woman's breasts.

Pillory Torture - A mild form of punishment, the pillory was frequently used in the medieval world.

Crocodile Tube - The crocodile tube was used to kill or extract confessions. It was one of the cruelest torture devices ever used on human beings.

The Brank - The Brank was used to humiliate women who "broke the public order" through gossip or other means.

Click this link for sickening details http://www.medievality.com/torture.html
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Cydonian
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« Reply #73 on: January 03, 2010, 01:04:31 am »

So who cares?  Does anybody care?  We were at war!!
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