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Eclipse Fever In Indian Village - UPDATES

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Bianca
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« on: July 15, 2009, 08:48:31 am »











                                                      Eclipse fever in Indian village 





 
BBC NEWS
July 15, 2009

An obscure village in the eastern Indian state of Bihar has suddenly shot into limelight as the best place in India to watch a total solar eclipse on 22 July. Amarnath Tewary travels to Taregna to discover the excitement among locals.

In Taregna, a science teacher is busy teaching her students about solar eclipses and how they can be viewed safely.

The students of St Mary School are being told that viewing the Sun's harsh light should only be done through proper solar telescopes or glasses.

Astro-physicists and scientists have marked the village as the "epicentre" of the eclipse.

The name Taregna, incidentally, means counting stars in Hindi.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 06:16:16 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2009, 08:53:50 am »









'Astro-tourist' influx



Total solar eclipses usually take place about once every 18 months, and always at new Moon - when the lunar body sits directly between the Sun and the Earth.

So, all of a sudden Taregna, some 35km (22 miles) from the state capital, Patna, has shot into limelight - some 20,000 "astro-tourists" and scientists from all over the world are expected to congregate here on the day of the eclipse.


 
"We do not wish to miss this rare opportunity"

Suraj Kumar



Local authorities are excited by Taregna's new-found status. Bihar's Chief Minister Nitish Kumar has said he will be visiting the town on the day of the eclipse.

"I have already instructed the officials to make proper arrangement for visitors at Taregna," says Mr Kumar.

Authorities have chosen three to four locations in Taregna from where people can view the eclipse.

St Mary School is one of them.

"We are very excited that Taregna has been chosen as the place for the best view of the solar eclipse. So we are teaching our school students about eclipses and how to view them after taking precautions," science teacher Ms Mamata says.

The village is being spruced up to receive all the tourists and scientists.

Approach roads are being repaired, drains are being cleaned and faulty electric wires are being replaced.

Many hotels in Patna have been booked in advance by people coming into town for the eclipse.
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2009, 08:58:13 am »










Special flights



From Taregna, the solar eclipse should be visible for at least three minutes and 38 seconds, says a Nasa bulletin.

However, the maximum duration of the eclipse will be six minutes 38 seconds in the Pacific Ocean.

In India, the eclipse will commence soon after sunrise. Surat in Gujarat and Patna in Bihar are also expected to be excellent locations for good views.

The villagers have never seen anything like it.
 
Legend has it that it was at Taregna that India's famous astronomer and mathematician Aryabhatta studied stars and planets during the Vedic age.

"We do not wish to miss this rare opportunity, especially when people from across the country are thronging here to witness the eclipse," say school students Ranjit Kumar and Suraj Kumar.

Tour operators have also made special arrangements to cash in on the occasion

Some of them have chartered planes to fly in eclipse watchers from other cities.

One of the planes will have 21 seats facing the Sun ("Sun-side seats") and 21 seats facing the Earth ("Earth-side seats"), says a tour operator.

"Sun-side seats, which will have a direct view of the eclipse, cost about 79,000 rupees [$1,618]," he says.
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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 06:13:28 pm »










                                       Solar eclipse pits superstition against science
           





– Sun Jul 19, 2009
MUMBAI
(AFP)

– Indian astrologers are predicting violence and turmoil across the world as a result of this week's total solar eclipse, which the superstitious and religious view as a sign of potential doom.

But astronomers, scientists and secularists are trying to play down claims of evil portent in connection with Wednesday's natural spectacle, when the moon will come between the Earth and the sun, completely obscuring the sun.

In Hindu mythology, the two demons Rahu and Ketu are said to "swallow" the sun during eclipses, snuffing out its life-giving light and causing food to become inedible and water undrinkable.

Pregnant women are advised to stay indoors to prevent their babies developing birth defects, while prayers, fasting and ritual bathing, particularly in holy rivers, are encouraged.

Shivani Sachdev Gour, a gynaecologist at the Fortis Hospital in New Delhi, said a number of expectant mothers scheduled for caesarian deliveries on July 22 had asked to change the date.

"This is a belief deeply rooted in Indian society. Couples are willing to do anything to ensure that the baby is not born on that day," Gour said.

Astrologers have predicted a rise in communal and regional violence in the days following the eclipse, particularly in India, China and other Southeast Asian nations where it can be seen on Wednesday morning.

Mumbai astrologer Raj Kumar Sharma predicted "some sort of attack by (Kashmiri separatists) Jaish-e-Mohammad or Al-Qaeda on Indian soil" and a devastating natural disaster in Southeast Asia.

An Indian political leader could be killed, he said, and tension between the West and Iran is likely to increase, escalating into possible US military action after September 9, when fiery Saturn moves from Leo into Virgo.

"The last 200 years, whenever Saturn has gone into Virgo there has been either a world war or a mini world war," he told AFP.

It is not just in India that some are uneasy about what will transpire because of the eclipse.

In ancient China they were often associated with disasters, the death of an emperor or other dark events, and similar superstitions persist.

"The probability for unrest or war to take place in years when a solar eclipse happens is 95 percent," announced an article that attracted a lot of hits on the popular Chinese web portal Baidu.com.

Sanal Edamaruku, president of the Indian Rationalist Association, dismissed such doomsday predictions.

"Primarily, what we see with all these soothsayers and astrologers is that they're looking for opportunities to enhance their business with predictions of danger and calamity," he told AFP.

"They have been very powerful in India but over the last decade they have been in systematic decline."

Astronomers and scientists are also working to educate the public about the eclipse.

Travel firm Cox and Kings has chartered a Boeing 737-700 aircraft to give people the chance to see the eclipse from 41,000 feet (12,500 metres).

Experts will be on board to explain it to passengers, some of whom have paid 79,000 rupees (1,600 dollars) for a "sun-side" seat on the three-hour flight from New Delhi.

The eclipse's shadow is expected to pass over the aircraft at 15 times the speed of sound (Mach 15), said Ajay Talwar, president of the SPACE Group of companies that promotes science and astronomy.

"It's coming in the middle of the monsoon season. On the ground, there's a 40 percent chance of seeing it in India. On the aircraft you have almost a 90 percent chance of seeing the eclipse," he added.

Siva Prasad Tata, who runs the Astro Jyoti website, straddles the two worlds.

"There's no need to get too alarmed about the eclipse, they are a natural phenomenon," the astrologer told AFP.

But he added: "During the period of the eclipse, the opposite attracting forces are very, very powerful. From a spiritual point of view, this is a wonderful time to do any type of worship.

"It will bring about good results, much more than on an ordinary day."
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 06:18:45 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2009, 06:15:31 pm »









                                    Thousands throng to village in India for eclipse






Indrajit Kumar Singh,
Associated Press Writer
Jul 21, 2009
TAREGNA,
India

– Scientists, students and nature enthusiasts prepared Tuesday for the longest total solar eclipse of the 21st century, while millions planned to shutter themselves indoors, giving in to superstitious myths about the phenomenon.

The eclipse will first be sighted at dawn Wednesday in India's Gulf of Khambhat, just north of the metropolis of Mumbai, before being seen in a broad swath moving north and east to Nepal, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Bhutan and China.

The eclipse — visible only in Asia — will reach its peak in India at about 6:20 a.m. local time (8:50 p.m. EDT; 0050 GMT), and will last 6 minutes and 39 seconds at its maximum point.

It is the longest such eclipse since July 11, 1991, when a total eclipse lasting 6 minutes, 53 seconds was visible from Hawaii to South America. There will not be a longer eclipse than Wednesday's until 2132.

Wednesday's eclipse will be seen for 3 minutes and 48 seconds in the Indian village of Taregna, where scientists say residents will have the clearest view.

Over the past week, this village has been swamped by researchers who will study scientific phenomena ranging from the behavior of birds and other animals to atmospheric changes affected by the eclipse.

Hotels in Patna were fully booked while taxis raised their rates — sensing a brief opportunity in the sudden interest in the village.

Scientists set up telescopes and other equipment in Taregna a day in advance to make the most of the window of opportunity provided by the eclipse.

"We are hoping to make some valuable observations on the formation of asteroids around the sun," Pankaj Bhama, a scientist with India's Science Popularization Association of Communicators and Educators, said Tuesday.

A 10-member team of scientists from the premier Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore and the Indian air force will be flying and filming the eclipse as it becomes visible in different parts of the country, an air force press release said.

Thousands of people lined up outside a planetarium in Patna on Tuesday to buy solar viewing goggles. The goggles, costing 20 rupees (40 cents), are supposed to act as filters and allow people to look at the sun without damaging their eyes.

But millions across India were shunning the sight and planned to stay indoors, gripped by fearful myths.

Across India, even in regions where the eclipse was not visible, pregnant women were advised to stay indoors in curtained rooms over a belief that the sun's invisible rays would harm the fetus and the baby would be born with disfigurations, birthmarks or a congenital defect.

Krati Jain, a software professional in New Delhi, said she planned to take a day off from work Wednesday to avoid what she called "any ill effects of the eclipse on my baby."

"My mother and aunts have called and told me stay in a darkened room with the curtains closed, lie in bed and chant prayers," said Jain, 24, who is expecting her first child.

In the northern Indian state of Punjab, authorities ordered schools to begin an hour late to prevent children from venturing out and gazing at the sun.

Others saw a business opportunity: one travel agency in India scheduled a charter flight to watch the eclipse by air, with seats facing the sun selling at a premium.

Additional police and paramilitary troops were posted around Patna and Taregna after Maoist rebels called for a strike Wednesday to protest increases in the price of gas and other essentials.

The rebels, who say they are inspired by Chinese revolutionary leader Mao Zedong, often target police and government workers.

"Adequate numbers of forces have been deployed at Taregna where top scientists and researchers are gathering to view the celestial wonder," said R. Mallar Vizhi, a senior superintendent of police in Patna.

___

On the Net:

Eclipses Online: http://www.eclipse.org.uk/

Mr. Eclipse: http://mreclipse.com/
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 06:19:16 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2009, 07:46:38 pm »










                                                 Asia watches long solar eclipse




 

BBC NEWS
July 21, 2009
 
People have been buying masks to view the eclipse.
 
People in Asia are watching what will be the longest total solar eclipse this century, with swathes of India and China to be plunged into darkness.

Amateur stargazers and scientists have travelled far to see the eclipse, which will last for about five minutes.

A partial eclipse could be seen early on Wednesday in eastern India, though in some regions there was thick cloud.

The eclipse will move east across India, Nepal, Burma, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China and the Pacific.

It will cross some southern Japanese islands and will last be visible from land at Nikumaroro Island in the South Pacific nation of Kiribati.

Elsewhere, a partial eclipse will be visible across much of Asia.
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« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2009, 07:48:50 pm »










Taking shelter



In India the village of Taregna, near Patna, has been swamped by researchers expecting a particularly clear view of the eclipse.

"We are hoping to make some valuable observations on the formation of asteroids around the sun," scientist Pankaj Bhama told the Associated Press news agency.
 
But pregnant women in India were advised to stay inside, following beliefs that the eclipse could harm a foetus.

"My mother and aunts have called and told me stay in a darkened room with the curtains closed, lie in bed and chant prayers," said Krati Jain, a software worker in New Delhi who is expecting her first child.

In eastern China, heavy cloud or rain was expected to make it virtually impossible to see the eclipse.

The previous total eclipse, in August 2008, lasted two minutes and 27 seconds.

This one will last six minutes and 39 seconds at its maximum point.
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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2009, 07:50:39 pm »










'Special opportunity'

Alphonse Sterling, a Nasa astrophysicist who will be following the eclipse from China, scientists are hoping data from the eclipse will help explain solar flares and other structures of the sun and why they erupt.

"We'll have to wait a few hundred years for another opportunity to observe a solar eclipse that lasts this long, so it's a very special opportunity," Shao Zhenyi, an astronomer at the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory in China told the Associated Press.

Solar scientist Lucie Green, from University College London, is aboard an American cruise ship heading for that point near the Japanese island of Iwo Jima, where the axis of the Moon's shadow will pass closest to Earth.

"The [Sun's] corona has a temperature of 2 million degrees but we don't know why it is so hot," she said.

"What we are going to look for are waves in the corona. ... The waves might be producing the energy that heats the corona. That would mean we understand another piece of the science of the Sun."

The next total solar eclipse will occur on 11 July next year. It will be visible in a narrow corridor over the southern hemisphere, from the southern Pacific Ocean to Argentina.
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« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2009, 07:52:20 pm »




                           
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« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2009, 08:03:39 pm »










                                      Solar Eclipse on July 22 May Be Most Viewed Ever






Rebecca Carroll
National Geographic News
July 20, 2009

A total solar eclipse passing over some of Earth's most densely populated regions on Wednesday,
July 22, 2009, may become the most viewed eclipse ever.
 
More People across central India and in parts of Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Myanmar will briefly
find themselves in daytime darkness before the solar eclipse proceeds into China.

Most of the best viewing opportunities are in China, where some 30 million people will be able to
witness the solar eclipse in the coastal cities of Shanghai and Hangzhou alone, according to veteran eclipse scientist Jay Pasachoff of Williams College in Massachusetts.

The eclipse will then continue east, passing over Japan's Ryukyu Islands before reaching its maximum duration point over the Pacific Ocean, where the sun will be completely blocked by the moon for 6 minutes and 39 seconds, according to NASA scientist Fred Espenak.

Thousands of overseas tourists and potentially millions of Chinese are flocking to areas along the
eclipse path, where hotels are charging higher rates, according to Chinese media reports.

The July 2009 total solar eclipse is expected to have the longest duration of totality in the 21st century, experts say, and should give Pasachoff plenty of data to keep him and his team busy for months.

Pasachoff will see only about five and half minutes of totality from a site in eastern China, but "once you have five minutes-plus of totality, the extra minute that we could have [seen] is not significant,"
he added.
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« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2009, 08:05:11 pm »










Preparation



Pasachoff and his team will observe the solar eclipse from a remote hotel at an altitude of about 3,000 feet (900 meters) on Tianhuangping, a mountain outside the Chinese city of Hangzhou. The location sits above pollution that could obstruct a full view of the eclipse.

He chose the site years in advance so he could witness the longest totality from the Asian mainland. Teams of astronomers from around the world have already joined him at Tianhuangping.

Pasachoff, a National Geographic Society Committee for Research and Exploration grantee, will witness his 49th solar eclipse and 29th total eclipse since he began chasing the sun on October 2, 1959. (The National Geographic Society owns National Geographic News.)

"We brought about half a ton of equipment and picked up an equal amount borrowed here from our Chinese colleagues, so there is a lot to get ready," he added.



(Related: "Eclipse Expert Makes Hot Finds in Sun's Darkest Hour.")
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2009, 08:06:31 pm »










Solar Mystery



Pasachoff wants to understand why the sun's corona—gas that extends millions of miles out from the sun—is millions of degrees hotter than the sun. The sun is just about 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit (3,300 degrees Celsius).

"Somehow energy has been put up into the corona from lower down, heating the gas, and we'd like to see how that happens," he said.

Scientists believe the coronal phenomenon has to do with the sun's magnetic field, and Pasachoff is looking to identify vibrating magnetic waves that move from the sun out into the corona.

(Related: "'Corkscrew' Waves Seen on Sun -- Keys to Solar Mystery?")

Scientists can't usually see the corona from Earth because its light is fainter than the blue sky created by our atmosphere.

Furthermore, instruments attached to space satellites can't isolate all areas of the corona because the sun and the light it scatters are too bright.

The only time certain observations are possible is when the moon blocks out the sun, creating a darker sky, which highlights the coronal light around the sun.

Although the sun is about 400 times bigger than the moon, it's also about 400 times more distant. So from the ground, the moon appears to be just a little bigger than the sun.
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2009, 08:08:14 pm »










Shadow Chasers



The sun's disappearing act attracts so-called eclipse tourists, who travel the world to watch solar eclipses which happen between two and five times a year, though total solar eclipses are less frequent.

Rollie Anderson, a retired actuary from St. Louis, Missouri, is in China now to watch his 14th eclipse.

"The cosmic coincidence that the sun and moon both appear in the sky as the same size, and then, on top of that, they line up every now and again. … Just the very idea of that is pretty mind-blowing," he said.

"As you get to the last several minutes before totality, that's when your eyes actually start noticing things getting dark around you, and you can feel the air cooling," he said. "It gets really dark and totality appears, and that's when it gets most spectacular."

"You see a black hole in the sky where the sun used be, and if there are birds around, they may stop chirping, because they think it's night."

Chasing eclipses has also allowed Anderson and his wife to see the world.

"It's kind of an excuse to see whatever the part of the world the eclipse happens to be in."
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« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2009, 06:46:35 am »











                                       Solar eclipse shrouds Asia in daytime darkness






Eric Talmadge,
Associated Press Writer
July 22, 2009
TOKYO,
Japan

– Millions of Asians turned their eyes skyward Wednesday as dawn suddenly turned to darkness across the continent in the longest total solar eclipse this century will see. Millions of others, seeing the rare event as a bad omen, shuttered themselves indoors.

Chinese launched fireworks and danced in Shanghai. On a remote Japanese island, bewildered cattle went to their feeding troughs thinking night had fallen. And in India, a woman was crushed as thousands of viewers crowded the banks of the Ganges for a glimpse.

Starting off in India just after dawn, the eclipse was visible across a wide swath of Asia before moving over southern Japan and then off into the Pacific Ocean. In some parts of Asia, it lasted as long as 6 minutes and 39 seconds.

The eclipse is the longest since July 11, 1991, when a total eclipse lasting 6 minutes, 53 seconds was visible from Hawaii to South America. There will not be a longer eclipse than Wednesday's until 2132.

The celestial event was met by a mixture of awe, excitement and fear.

Cloudy skies and rain damped the show in many areas, but villagers in the town of Varanasi, on the banks of the Ganges in India, got one of the best views.

Thousands of Hindus took to the waters to cleanse their sins. The eclipse was seen there for 3 minutes and 48 seconds.

The gathering was marred when a 65-year-old woman was killed and six people injured in a stampede at one of the river's banks where about 2,500 people had gathered, said police spokesman Surendra Srivastava. He said it is not clear how the stampede started.

Others in India, though, were gripped by fear and refused to come outdoors. In Hindu mythology, an eclipse is caused when a dragon-demon swallows the sun, while another myth is that sun rays during an eclipse can harm unborn children.

"My mother and aunts have called and told me stay in a darkened room with the curtains closed, lie in bed and chant prayers," Krati Jain, 24, who is expecting her first child, said in New Delhi.

Clouds obscured the sun when the eclipse began. But they parted in several Indian cities minutes before the total eclipse took place at 6:24 a.m. (0054 GMT; 8:54 p.m. EDT).

On the tiny Japanese island of Akuseki, where the total eclipse lasted 6 minutes and 25 seconds, more than 200 tourists had to take shelter inside a school gymnasium due to a tornado warning.

But when the sky started to darken, everyone rushed out to the schoolyard, cheering and applauding, said island official Seiichiro Fukumitsu.

"The sky turned dark like in the dead of the night. The air turned cooler and cicadas stopped singing. Everything was so exciting and moving," Fukumitsu said.

Some villagers reported that their cows gathered at a feeding station, apparently mistaking the eclipse as a signal that it was dinner time, he said.

"It was rather mysterious," he said. "It must have been a frightening experience for people hundreds of years ago."

Jubilant eclipse watchers in China set off fireworks near the banks of the Qiantang River in coastal Zheijiang province as skies darkened overhead for about six minutes. Visitors from countries including Britain, Germany and Australia joined curious Chinese onlookers. Heavy clouds blocked the full eclipse but watchers saw a partial one.

The river bank in Yanguan village drew an exceptional number of watchers because it was also the site of the world's largest tidal bore, a phenomenon triggered by the eclipse where a giant tidal wave runs against the river's currents.

In Beijing, a thick blanket of grayish smog blotted out the sky.

In coastal Shanghai, eclipse watchers were disappointed by a light drizzle in the morning. As the sky darkened fully for about five minutes, however, watchers became excited.

Holding a big green umbrella and wearing special glasses, Song Chunyun was prepared to celebrate the occasion in a new white dress.

"Although the rain came, I don't want to screw up the mood. I want to enjoy the special day," she said before dancing and singing in the rain with her two sisters.

At a Buddhist temple in the Thai capital Bangkok, dozens of monks led a mass prayer at a Buddhist temple to ward off evil.

"The eclipse is bad omen for the country," said Pinyo Pongjaroen, a prominent astrologer. "We are praying to boost the fortune of the country."

In Myanmar, Buddhists went to Yangon's famed Shwedagon pagoda to offer flowers, fruits and water to ward off misfortune. Some warned their friends and family not to sleep through the eclipse for fear of getting bad luck.

"We all got up early this morning and prayed at home because our abbot told us that the solar eclipse is a bad omen," said a 43-year old school teacher Aye Aye Thein.

Bangladeshis also came out in droves.

"It's a rare moment, I never thought I would see this in my life," said Abdullah Sayeed, a college student who traveled to Panchagarh town from the capital, Dhaka.

He said cars in the town needed to use headlights as "night darkness has fallen suddenly." People hugged each other and some blew whistles when the eclipse began.

Total eclipses are caused when the moon moves directly between the sun and the earth, covering it completely to cast a shadow on earth.

___

On the Net:

Eclipses Online: http://www.eclipse.org.uk/

Mr. Eclipse: http://mreclipse.com/

----

Associated Press writers

Julhas Alam
in Dhaka, Bangladesh,

Ambika Ahuja
in Bangkok,

Mari Yamaguchi
in Tokyo,

Eugene Hoshiko
in Yanguan, China,

and researcher
Ji Chen
in Shanghai

contributed to this report.
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« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2009, 07:48:10 pm »






VIDEO

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/07/090722-eclipse-video-ap.html
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