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Haunted Locations Throughout the World

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Author Topic: Haunted Locations Throughout the World  (Read 2070 times)
Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2009, 11:12:00 pm »



Port Arthur as a busy port in the 1870s
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #31 on: July 14, 2009, 11:12:32 pm »

Massacre

On 28 April 1996, Martin Bryant went on a killing spree at Port Arthur, murdering 35 people and wounding 21 more before being captured by Special Operatives Police. This led to a national ban on semi-automatic shotguns and rifles. It also forged a relationship between the town and Dunblane, a Scottish town which suffered a similar incident earlier that year.
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #32 on: July 14, 2009, 11:13:35 pm »




Island of the Dead
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« Reply #33 on: July 14, 2009, 11:14:18 pm »

# Port Arthur, Tasmania Tasmania. A large number of visitors to the site report seeing spectres of past convicts and others wandering through the grounds. Stories of ghostly interactions are recorded from the 1870s to the present day with many of these modern sighting recorded on the nightly ghost tours held at the site.[4]
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #34 on: July 14, 2009, 11:15:21 pm »

Ballarat Gaol



Front of the Ballarat Gaol
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #35 on: July 14, 2009, 11:16:07 pm »

The Former Ballarat Gaol was one of the earliest constructions as part of the great gaol building programme which was a result of the report of the Select Committee on Prison Discipline of September 1857.

All prisons built in Victoria after 1851 adopted London's Pentonville Prison design of 1842, which carried on a revolution in prison design begun in 1829 by Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia. The complex was based on a central hall from which radiated wings of cells. The principle of the design being that one guard would stand in the centre of the hall and at one glance survey all cells. [1]

The construction of the gaol began in 1856 and the first cell blocks were completed by 1857. It was completed in 1862 with 58 cells designed to hold a mixture of 74 male and female prisoners. In 1862 a tunnel was constructed to join the gaol to Ballarat Courthouse next door. This allowed for the safe transfer of prisoners. The prison was closed in 1965.[1]

Most of the gaol was demolished to allow the School of Mines Ballarat to expand onto the site. The remaining structures at the site include the main gate, warden's residence and governor's residence. These buildings are now used by the University of Ballarat.

The site is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #36 on: July 14, 2009, 11:16:49 pm »



Remaining guard tower at the old Ballarat Gaol
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« Reply #37 on: July 14, 2009, 11:17:16 pm »

The Old Ballarat Gaol in Ballarat. Thirteen people were executed here. The remains of 7 criminals are still in the grounds. Features in Ballarat Ghost Tours, operating nightly.[5]
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« Reply #38 on: July 14, 2009, 11:18:59 pm »

Princess Theatre, Melbourne




Spring Street facade
Address    
163 Spring Street
City    
Melbourne
Country    Australia
Designation    Victorian Heritage Register
Architect    William Pitt
Owned by    Marriner Theatres
Capacity    1488 seats
Opened    1857
Years active    1857-
Current use    musicals, opera
www.marrinertheatres.com.au/hireprincess.htm
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2009, 11:19:17 pm »

The Princess Theatre is a 1488-seat theatre in Melbourne, Australia.

It is listed by the National Trust of Australia and is on the Victorian Heritage Register.
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« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2009, 11:19:30 pm »

It was first erected in 1854 by actor-manager George Coppin, who would create Melbourne's theatre land. He already owned the Olympic (known as the 'Iron Pot') on the corner of Exhibition and Lonsdale Streets, installed gas lights in November 1855 into Astley's, and then he would go on to take over the Theatre Royal in Bourke Street.

The Princess Theatre is the second building on the present site - the first being Astley's Amphitheatre which opened in 1854 containing a central ring for equestrian entertainment and a stage at one end for dramatic performances. It was named in honour of the Astley Royal Amphitheatre, near Westminster Bridge, London

In 1857, the amphitheatre was renovated and the facade extended, then re-opening as the Princess Theatre and Opera House.

By 1885, the partnership of J. C. Williamson, George Musgrove and Arthur Garner, had been formed and they became known as 'The Triumvirate', the business becoming known as J. C. Williamson's. The Triumvirate resolved to build a new theatre.

Completed in 1866 to the design of architect William Pitt; George Gordon to design the interior; and Cockram and Comely as the builders; re-development of the Theatre took place at a cost of £50,000. The design is in the exuberant Second Empire style, and the theatre forms part of the Victorian streetscape of Spring Street.

When completed, it featured the world's first sliding or retractable roof and ceiling. It also featured state-of-the-art electrical stage lighting.

The theatre re-opened, again, on 18 December 1886, with a performance of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado. The marble staircase and foyer was hailed as equal to that of the Paris Opera, the Frankfurt Stadt and the Grand in Bordeaux.

On 26 December 1922, new owners, Benjamin John Fuller and Hugh J. Ward renovated and reopened the theatre, with a performance of The O'Brien Girl.

In 1987, David Marriner purchased the Princess Theatre; he renovated and had the 1922 origins documented, then 9 December 1989, the theatre re-opened with the musical Les Misérables, followed by The Phantom of the Opera, establishing a new record for the longest running show ever staged in Victoria.
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« Reply #41 on: July 14, 2009, 11:19:57 pm »

Ghost sightings

The theatre has experienced several reported ghost sightings.[1]

On the evening of 3 March 1888, the baritone Frederick Baker, known as "Federici", was performing the role of Mephistopheles in Gounod's opera Faust. This production ended with Mephistopheles sinking dramatically through a trapdoor returning to the fires of hell with his prize, the unfortunate Dr Faustus. The audience was spellbound. As the audience held its collective breath as Federici was lowered down through the stage into this basement, he had a heart attack and died immediately. They laid him on the floor, lifeless, in his crimson vestments. He never came back onstage, never took the bows. When the company was gathered together to be told that Federici had died, they asked, "When?". Being told of what had happened at the end of the opera, they said, "He's just been onstage and taken the bows with us." Since then, many people who have never heard of the Federici story have claimed to see a ghostly figure in evening dress at the theatre. For many years, the third-row seat in the dress circle was kept vacant in his honour. [2]

When a documentary was made nearly 80 years later, by Kennedy-Miller in the early 1970s, a photograph of the film set revealed an ashen-faced, partly transparent observer. No-one on the set saw the figure on that day; only the photograph revealed 'the ghost'.
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #42 on: July 14, 2009, 11:20:47 pm »



Melbourne Princess Theatre in Spring Street
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« Reply #43 on: July 14, 2009, 11:24:05 pm »

# Princess Theatre, Melbourne Melbourne, Australia, has reported several ghosts since the building opened in 1886. The theatre's best known 'inhabitant' is Frederick Baker, stage name 'Federici', a talented bass-baritone singer who died in March 1888 whilst singing Mephistopheles in Faust - and who was seen by the rest of the cast taking his bows with them shortly thereafter. For years the theatre kept a seat vacant in the dress circle for Federici (only ceasing the practice on economic grounds), and his appearance in the dress circle during rehearsals for a new show is considered a good omen.[6]
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Danielle Marshall
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« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2009, 11:26:54 pm »

Richmond, Victoria



Lalor House in Richmond, Victoria is reportedly haunted by the ghosts of the family of Peter Lalor.[7]
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