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Major Dig At Earliest Scots Site

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Bianca
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« on: May 02, 2009, 09:16:32 am »









                                                  Major dig at earliest Scots site 






BBC NEWS
May 2, 2009



 
Archaeologists and volunteers
will carry out further excavations 


A big archaeological dig is taking place at the site in South Lanarkshire where the earliest
evidence of human beings in Scotland was found.

The Biggar Archaeology Group is beginning a major excavation of the area at Howburn Farm
near Elsrickle.

Last month it was revealed that flint artefacts unearthed there could date back 14,000 years
to 12,000 BC.

Volunteers have been encouraged to go along to the site this weekend to take part in further
exploration.

The flints, discovered in 2005 but only recently carbon dated, are similar to tools known to have
been used in the Netherlands and northern Germany in 12,000 BC.

They were probably used by hunters to kill reindeer, mammoth and giant elk and to cut up prey
and prepare their skins.



Details of the finds were published in

British Archaeology magazine.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 09:19:32 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2009, 09:28:21 am »











The discovery conjures up a picture of wandering groups of hunters making their way across dry land where the North Sea is now, after the end of the Ice Age.

The details are revealed in the latest edition of British Archaeology magazine.


The editor, Mike Pitts, said the finds were "the most northerly evidence for the earliest people in Britain".

Similar finds have been made in England, but they have mostly been south of the river Humber.

Up until now, the earliest evidence for humans in Scotland has come from sites such as Cramond, near Edinburgh.

Waste pits and discarded hazelnut shells found there have been dated to about 8,500 BC.

Tam Ward, from the Biggar Archaeology Group, which carried out the dig, said: "To push Scotland's human history back by nearly 4,000 years is remarkable.

"We didn't set out to do that," he added. "What we wanted to do was tell the story of the landscape."

He warned that "a lot of people won't believe this. Not until they see the hard evidence".

"But it'll be great fun proving them wrong. We've got the physical objects, so we can just put them down on the table and say argue with that".
« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 09:35:14 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2009, 09:29:59 am »



This pointed flint would have
been used as an arrow head









At first the flints were thought to date from the Neolithic period - about 3,000 BC.

But their true significance was later realised by Torben Ballin, an expert in stone finds, and Alan Saville from the National Museums of Scotland.

Mr Saville told BBC Scotland: "There would have been a temporary camp site where the flints were found, so there's a faint possibility that there might be post holes and waste pits there."

He added that the chances of finding that evidence were "fairly slim, but we live in hope".

He said the diggers from Biggar were planning to go back to the site in the summer to explore it further.

Historic Scotland provided some funding for the work.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 09:32:38 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2009, 09:37:44 am »





                       
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Bianca
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2009, 09:57:07 am »



               






Monday, 21 August 2006
BBC NEWS 

 
 
                                            Hot weather reveals Scotland's history 



Aerial archaeologists say the hot weather has produced parched landscapes which have revealed
the remains of early settlements



The Roman forts and camps at Trimontium (Newstead)
lie below the Eildon Hills near Melrose.



West Lindsaylands, near Biggar, South Lanarkshire
- two arcs of ditches in the top right of the field
may be the remains of a Neolithic enclosure and an
Iron Age fort.



Burncastle, near Lauder
- this Iron Age hill fort has been partly levelled by ploughing.



Burnfoot, near Quothquan in South Lanarkshire
- the top enclosure may be a prehistoric settlement and
is cut by the later enclosure which may be medieval in date.



Whitekirk, near East Linton in East Lothian
- this is probably a medieval farmstead with
a large rectangular building and adjacent
yards and enclosures.



Greenwood, near Grantshouse in the Borders
- this double ditched enclosure is probably an
Iron Age settlement and is one of thousands
of sites recorded over the last 30 years.



Redpath, near Melrose
- this heavily defended prehistoric settlement
was recorded for the first time in 2006.



Letham, Fife
- this enclosure was recorded for the first time
in 2006 and is likely to be late prehistoric in date.



Crail World War II airfield, Fife
- buildings and paths that have been removed are
visible as crop marks above the buildings that are
still standing.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 10:02:20 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
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