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The Barddas of Iolo Morganwg Vol. I

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Author Topic: The Barddas of Iolo Morganwg Vol. I  (Read 2867 times)
Majir
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« Reply #165 on: October 22, 2009, 01:26:38 pm »

the question is the degree of Chair obtained or refused. The answer is between the aspirant and his conscience, and between his conscience and God, not between him and his teacher.


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Majir
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« Reply #166 on: October 22, 2009, 01:26:47 pm »

Footnotes
51:1 p. 50 This line is from the works of William Lleyn, 1540-1587.

51:2 Al. "ten."

51:3 The sameness of the word is better kept in the original, "torri" meaning both to cut and to break.



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Majir
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« Reply #167 on: October 22, 2009, 01:27:20 pm »

ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF LETTERS.--EINIGAN THE GIANT.--THE GWYDDONIAID.--SYSTEMS OF LETTERS.
a. e. i. o.--b. c. t. l. s. r. p.

It was Einigan the Giant that first understood letters; and he made the principal cuttings, which were eleven, that is, the four vowels, and the seven consonants. And he inscribed on wood the memorial of every object he beheld, every story he heard, and every honour he understood. Others considering the things that Einigan did, concluded that he was a devil, and banished him. Upon this he came to his father's kindred in the Isle of Britain, and exhibited his art, and they adjudged him to be the wisest of the wise, and called him Einigan the Gwyddon, and all, who learned the art of letters, they called Gwyddoniaid, which Gwyddoniaid were the principal sages of the Isle of Britain, before Bards were systematically distinguished in
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Majir
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« Reply #168 on: October 22, 2009, 01:27:30 pm »

respect of privilege and usage. When Bards and Bardism were arranged, they were required to keep the memorial of the eleven cuttings. After this the art was improved, and sixteen cuttings were obtained, which were called the sixteen letters; subsequently, eighteen, and thence until twenty-four, to which were added the fourteen secondary letters, as they are now seen. This is preserved in the memorial of voice and letters,
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« Reply #169 on: October 22, 2009, 01:27:46 pm »

and the usage of the Bards of the Isle of Britain. The system of eleven is called the system of Einigan; the one of sixteen, the system of Edric; the one of eighteen, the system of Alawn 1 "and the system of the Bards;" 2 the one of twenty-four is called the system of Arthavael; and



p. 54 p. 55

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Majir
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« Reply #170 on: October 22, 2009, 01:27:54 pm »

the one now in use is called the new system, and the system of Idnerth the Artist. It was in the time when Gruffudd, son of Llywelyn, son of Seisyllt, exercised prerogative over Cymru universal, that this Idner lived. 1 Thus are shown the origin of letters and the sciences of books in the memorials of the Bards of the Isle of Britain.



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« Reply #171 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:03 pm »

Footnotes
53:1 p. 52 The literary achievement of Alawn is thus recorded in the "Englynion y Gorugiau" by Geraint the Blue Bard;--


Goruc Alawn fardd Prydain,
Gofredeu cleu clodysgein,
Coel cyd celfyddyd cyfrein.
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Majir
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« Reply #172 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:11 pm »

The achievement of Alawn, the Bard of Britain,
Was to establish true memorial of spreading fame--
The mutual recording in the art of disputation.
                              Iolo MSS. pp. 263, 670.



53:2 p. 53 Added from another MS.

55:1 p. 54 I.e. between A. D. 1021 and 1064.



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« Reply #173 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:29 pm »

THE ORIGIN OF LETTERS AND BOOKS.--THEIR INTRODUCTION INTO BRITAIN--THE COELBREN.
Who was the first that obtained understanding respecting letters?

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Majir
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« Reply #174 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:37 pm »

Adam first obtained it from God in Paradise, and his son, Abel the Innocent, learned it of his father. Cain the Murderer, Abel's brother, would have fame from the good things of the world, but Abel would not, except from sciences that were pleasing to God, and from understanding and learning relative to what God did or desired. Wherefore Cain envied his brother Abel, and slew him feloniously and treacherously. 2 Then the sciences, which Abel caused to be understood, were lost. After that, Adam had another son, whose name was Seth; and he taught him the knowledge of letters, and all other divine
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« Reply #175 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:46 pm »

sciences. And to Seth was a son, whose name was Enos, who was educated by his father as a man of letters and praiseworthy sciences in respect of book and learning. It was Enos who was the first that made a book of record, for the purpose of preserving the memory of every thing beautiful, commendable, and good, that is, of what God the Creator did, and of his works in heaven and earth; and he enjoined this to man as a law and ordinance. 3 This knowledge was preserved
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« Reply #176 on: October 22, 2009, 01:28:55 pm »

by the posterity of Enos until the time of Noah the Aged; and when the water of the deluge had ceased, and the ship had come on dry land, Noah taught the knowledge of books, and all other sciences, to his son Japheth, and our nation, the Cymry, who were descended from Japheth, son of Noah the Aged, obtained this knowledge, and brought it with them to the Isle of Britain,



p. 56 p. 57

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« Reply #177 on: October 22, 2009, 01:29:03 pm »

and they maintained, amplified, and enlarged the sciences of book and learning, and placed them on record until Christ came in the flesh.

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« Reply #178 on: October 22, 2009, 01:29:11 pm »

What were the first books that were first known to the nation of the Cymry, and what were their materials?

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« Reply #179 on: October 22, 2009, 01:29:20 pm »

Wood, that is, trees, and that mode was called Coelbren, from which comes the Coelbren of the Bards, as it is still on record by the nation of the Cymry. There was no other mode of dealing with letters known to our nation before Christ came in the flesh.

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