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Paradise Found

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Jenna Bluehut
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« on: February 12, 2009, 11:21:05 am »

Paradise Found
by William F. Warren
[1885]

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Jenna Bluehut
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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2009, 11:21:55 am »

The location of the Garden of Eden should be one of those unanswerable questions, such as 'what song did the sirens sing?' This has not stopped speculation on the topic. Some of these works treat Eden as a metaphor for the human body, such as this text. Others were much more literal. William Warren wrote this 500 page tome to propose a polar Eden, in some primeval ice-free epoch. He systematically employs data from contemporary geology, ethnology, zoology, botany and paleontology to bolster this argument.


In the 19th century, polar explorers had yet to fill in the blanks on the maps at the poles, and geologists had yet to discover plate tectonics, or create detailed maps of paleogeography. We now know that the last time that the poles were ice-free was long before humans walked the earth. In addition, there is no northern polar continent, and probably never has been. However, recently one author (Out of Antarctica, Robert Argod, ISBN 1902699459) has proposed that humans originated in Antarctica, and migrated north. He uses much the same collection of data as Warren, although he leans very heavily on a hypothetical pole shift, which Warren did not.

The argument of this book is obviously moot, and much of the hard scientific data is either misinterpreted or obsolete. However, Warren's review of the literature of the folklore of the world-mountain, the tree of life, and the earthly paradise is of continuing value, and worth reading if you have any interest in the mysteries of our past.

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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2009, 11:22:02 am »

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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 11:22:20 am »

PARADISE FOUND
THE CRADLE OF THE HUMAN RACE AT THE NORTH POLE
p. ii

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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2009, 11:22:35 am »

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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2009, 11:22:51 am »

Frontispiece: DIAGRAM ILLUSTRATING THE TRUE KEY TO ANCIENT COSMOLOGY AND MYTHICAL GEOGRAPHY.


Compare p. 479.

A. The Northern celestial Pole in the zenith.
A B. The axis of the heavens in perpendicular position.
C D. The axis of the Earth in perpendicular position.
I I I I. The abode of the supreme God, or gods.
2, 3, 4. Europe, Asia, and the known portion of Africa.
5 5 5. The Earth-surrounding equatorial Ocean-river.
6 6 6. The abode of disembodied human souls.
7 7 7 7. The abode of demons.
C. Location of submerged Eden.
C A. "The Strength of the Hill of Sion"
 
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« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2009, 11:23:08 am »

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« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2009, 11:23:37 am »

PARADISE FOUND
THE CRADLE OF THE HUMAN RACE AT THE NORTH POLE
A Study of the Prehistoric World
BY
WILLIAM F. WARREN, S. T. D., LL. D.
PRESIDENT OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY, CORPORATE MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, AUTHOR OF "ANFANGSGRÜNDE DER LOGIK," "EINLEITUNG IN DIE SYSTEMATISCHE THEOLOGIE," "THE TRUE KEY TO ANCIENT COSMOLOGY AND MYTHICAL GEOGRAPHY," ETC., ETC.
WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS
SIXTH EDITION
BOSTON
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY
New York: 11 East Seventeenth Street
The Riverside Press, Cambridge
[1885]
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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2009, 11:23:50 am »

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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2009, 11:24:08 am »

The Riverside Press, Cambridge:

Electrotyped and Printed by H. O. Houghton and Company.

p. v

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED,

WITH FRIENDLY PERMISSION,

TO

PROFESSOR F. MAX MÜLLER,

OF

THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.



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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2009, 11:25:44 am »

p. vii

PREFACE.
This book is not the work of a dreamer. Neither has it proceeded from a love of learned paradox. Nor yet is it a cunningly devised fable aimed at particular tendencies in current science, philosophy, or religion. It is a thoroughly serious and sincere attempt to present what is to the author's mind the true and final solution of one of the greatest and most fascinating of all problems connected with the history of mankind.

That this true solution has not been furnished before is not strange. The suggestion that primitive Eden was at the Arctic Pole seems at first sight the most incredible of all wild and willful paradoxes. And it is only within the lifetime of our own generation that the progress of geological discovery has relieved the hypothesis of fatal antecedent improbability. Moreover, when one considers the enormous variety and breadth of the fields from which its evidences of truth must be derived; when one remembers how recent are those comparative sciences on whose results the argument must chiefly depend; when one observes that many of the most striking of our alleged proofs, both in

p. viii

the physical and in the anthropological domain, are precisely the latest of the conclusions -of these most modern of all sciences,—it is easy to see that a generation ago the demonstration here attempted could not have been given. Even five years ago some of the most interesting and cogent of our arguments would as yet have been lacking.

The interest which has so long invested our problem, and which has prompted so many attempts to solve it, was never greater than to-day. The lapse of centuries has rendered many another question antiquated, but not this. On the contrary, the more the modern world has advanced in new knowledge, the more exigent has grown the necessity of finding a valid solution. Men are feeling as never before that until the starting-point of human history can be determined, the historian, the archæologist, and the paleontological anthropologist are all working in the dark. It is seen that without this desideratum the ethnologist, the philologist, the mythographer, the theologian, the sociologist can none of them construct anything not liable to profound modification, if not to utter overthrow, the moment any new light shall be thrown upon the mother-region and the prehistoric movements of the human race. Every anthropological science, therefore, and every science related to anthropology, seems at the present moment to be standing in a state of dubitant expectancy, willing to work a little tentatively, but conscious of

p. ix

its destitution of the needful primal datum, and conscious of its consequent lack of a valid structural law.

To the believer in Revelation, or even in the most ancient and venerable Ethnic Traditions, the volume here presented will be found to possess uncommon interest. For many years the public mind has been schooled in a narrow naturalism, which has in its world-view as little room for the extraordinary as it has for the supernatural. Decade after decade the representatives of this teaching have been measuring the natural phenomena of every age and of every place by the petty measuring rod of their own local and temporary experience. So long and so successfully have they dogmatized on the constancy of Nature's laws and the uniformity of Nature's forces that of late it has required no small degree of courage to enable an intelligent man to stand up in the face of his generation and avow his personal faith in the early existence of men of gigantic stature and of almost millenarian longevity. Especially have clergymen and Christian teachers and writers upon Biblical history been embarrassed by the popular incredulity on these subjects, and not infrequently by a consciousness that this incredulity was in some measure shared by themselves. To all such, and indeed to all the broader minded among the naturalists themselves, a new philosophy of primeval history—a philosophy which for all the alleged extraordinary

p. x

effects provides the adequate extraordinary causes—cannot fail to prove most welcome.

The execution of the plan of the book is by no means all that the author could desire. To the elaboration of so vast an argument, the materials for which must be gleaned from every possible field of knowledge, the broadest and profoundest scholar might well devote the undistracted labor of a lifetime. To the writer, loaded with the cares of a laborious executive office, there were lacking both the leisure and the equipment otherwise attainable for so high a task. The best he could do was to turn one or two summer vacations into work-time and give the result to the world. Of the correctness of his position he has no doubt, and of the preparedness of the scientific world to accept it he is also confident.

To the foregoing remarks it may be proper to add that apart from its immediate purpose the book has interest, and, it is hoped, value as a contribution to the infant science of Comparative Mythology. By the application of the author's "True Key to Ancient Cosmology and Mythical Geography," it has been possible to adjust and interpret a great variety of ancient cosmological and geographical notions never before understood by modern scholars. For example, the origin and significance of the Chinvat Bridge are here for the first time explained. The indication of the polocentric character common to the mythical systems of sacred geography

p. xi

among all ancient peoples will probably be new to every reader. The new light thrown upon such questions as those relating to the direction of the Sacred Quarter, the location of the Abode of the Dead, the character and position of the Cosmical Tree, the course of the backward-flowing Ocean-river, the correlation of the "Navels" of Earth and Heaven,—not to enumerate other points,—can hardly fail to attract the lively attention of all students and teachers of ancient mythology and mythical geography.

To teachers of Homer the fresh contributions toward a right understanding of Homeric cosmology are sure to prove of value. And if, in the end, the work may only lead to a systematic and intelligent teaching of the long neglected, but most important science of ancient cosmology and mythical geography in all reputable universities and classical schools, it will surely not have been written in vain.

That the author has escaped all errors and oversights while ranging through so numerous and such diverse fields of investigation, many of which are but just opened to the pioneering specialist, is too much to expect. He only asks that any such blemishes which a more competent scholarship may detect, or which the progress of new learning may yet bring to light, may not be allowed to prejudice the force of true arguments, but may be pointed out in the spirit of a candid and helpful criticism.

In conclusion, the author respectfully commits

p. xii

his work to all truth-seeking spirits,—not less to the patient investigators of nature than to the students of history, of literature, and of religion. Particularly would he commend it to all those yearning and waiting Königssöhnen whose experience has been described by Hans Andersen in the words, "Es war einmal ein Königssohn; Niemand hatte so viele und schöne Bücher wie er; Alles, was in dieser Welt geschehen, konnte er darin lesen, und die Abbildungen in prächtigen Kupferstichen erblicken. Von jedem Volke und jedem Lande konnte er Auskunft erhalten; aber wo der Garten des Paradieses zu finden sei, davon stand kein Wort darin; und der, gerade der war es, an dem er am meisten dachte." 1

W. F. W.

Boston.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Footnotes
xii:1 The same, being interpreted, read as follows: "Once upon a time there was a king's son; nobody had so many and such beautiful books as he. In these all that had ever happened in the world he could read and see depicted in splendid engravings. Of every people and of every land could he get information, but as to where the Garden of Eden was,—not a word was to be found therein; and this, just this it was, on which he meditated most of all."



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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2009, 11:26:15 am »

p. xiii

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
 
 Page
 
DEDICATION
 v
 
PREFACE
 viii
 
 
 
 
PART FIRST.
 
 
THE LOCATION OF EDEN: STATE OF THE QUESTION.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
THE RESULTS OF EXPLORERS, HISTORIC AND LEGENDARY.
 
 
Columbus approaching the gate
 3
 
The report of Sir John de Maundeville
 7
 
Adventures of Prince Eirek
 10
 
The voyages of St. Brandan and of Oger
 12
 
The success of the author of The Book of Enoch
 20
 
An equestrian's anticipations
 21
 
David Livingstone a searcher for Eden
 22
 
Unanimous verdict: Non est inventus
 22
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
THE RESULTS OF THEOLOGIANS.
 
 
Ideas of the church fathers
 23
 
Opinions of Luther and of Calvin
 25
 
Contemporary opinion entirely conflicting
 25
 
Inconclusive character of the Biblical data
 26
 
The garden "eastward"
 27
 
The "Euphrates"
 28
 
The problem "unsolved if not insoluble"
 32
 
p. xiv
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER III.
 
 
THE RESULTS OF NON-THEOLOGICAL SCHOLARS: NATURALISTS, ETHNOLOGISTS, ETC.
 
 
The unity of the human species
 33
 
But one "mother-region"
 33
 
Its location—ten different answers
 35
 
Views of Darwin, Häckel, Peschel, etc.
 35
 
Views of Quatrefages, Obry, etc.
 36
 
Locations of lost Atlantis
 38
 
Theory of Friedrich Delitzsch
 39
 
Theory of E. Beauvois
 41
 
Theory of Gerald Massey
 42
 
The Utopians
 43
 
Despair of a solution
 43
 
 
 
 
PART SECOND.
 
 
A FRESH HYPOTHESIS: PRIMITIVE EDEN AT THE NORTH POLE.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
THE HYPOTHESIS, AND THE CONDITIONS OF ITS ADMISSIBILITY.
 
 
Statement of the hypothesis
 47
 
Seven sciences to be satisfied
 48
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
IMPORTANT NEW FEATURES AT ONCE INTRODUCED INTO THE PROBLEM OF THE SITE OF EDEN AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THESE FOR A VALID SOLUTION.
 
 
Seven peculiarities of a polar Eden
 50
 
Our hypothesis consequently most difficult
 53
 
Its certain break-down if not true
 53
 
 
 
 
PART THIRD.
 
 
THE HYPOTHESIS SCIENTIFICALLY TESTED AND CONFIRMED.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF SCIENTIFIC GEOGONY.
 
 
Popular prepossessions
 57
 
Secular refrigeration of the earth
 57
 
p. xv
 
 
Inevitable implications of the doctrine
 58
 
Bearing of these upon our problem
 59
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF ASTRONOMICAL GEOGRAPHY.
 
 
Length of the polar day
 60
 
Mistakes of Geikie and Lyell
 60
 
The actual duration of daylight
 61
 
Experience of Weyprecht and Payer
 62
 
Experience of Barentz
 63
 
Citation from Baron Nordenskjöld
 63
 
The statement of Captain Pim
 64
 
The explanation of discrepancies
 65
 
A safe settlement of the question
 66
 
The polar night
 68
 
Aspects and progress of the polar day
 69
 
A paradisaic abode
 70
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER III.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF PHYSIOGRAPHICAL GEOLOGY.
 
 
A primitive circumpolar continent
 71
 
Anticipated by Klee
 71
 
Speculations of Wallace
 72
 
Postulated by Professor Heer
 73
 
Also by Baron Nordenskjöld
 73
 
Testimony of Starkie Gardner
 74
 
Testimony of Geikie
 74
 
Theories as to its submergence
 75
 
Adhémar's theory
 75
 
Theory of tidal action
 75
 
Leibnitz's theory of crust-collapse
 79
 
Summary of evidence under this head
 82
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER IV.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF PREHISTORIC CLIMATOLOGY.
 
 
Primeval temperature at the Pole
 83
 
The evidence of scientific geogony
 84
 
The evidence of paleontological botany
 84
 
Testimony of life-history
 85
 
Estimates of Professor Heer
 85
 
Declaration of Sir Charles Lyell
 86
 
Conclusion
 86
 
p. xvi
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER V.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF PALEONTOLOGICAL BOTANY.
 
 
The starting-point of all floral types
 87
 
A remarkable recent discovery
 87
 
Sir Joseph ****
 88
 
The contribution of Heer
 89
 
Of Professor Asa Gray
 90
 
The claim of Count Saporta
 90
 
The conclusions of Otto Kuntze
 92
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VI.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF PALEONTOLOGICAL ZOÖLOGY.
 
 
Geographical distribution of animals
 93
 
First remarkable fact
 93
 
Second remarkable fact
 94
 
Language of Professor Orton
 94
 
Language of Professor Packard
 94
 
Mr. Alfred Russel Wallace cited
 95
 
Conclusion
 95
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VII.
 
 
THE TESTIMONY OF PALEONTOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND GENERAL ETHNOLOGY.
 
 
One traveler who has been in Eden
 97
 
His note-books lost
 97
 
What says Paléoethnique science?
 97
 
The first conclusions of Quatrefages
 98
 
His premonitions of a new doctrine
 98
 
Count Saporta's conclusions
 99
 
F. Müller and M. Wagner's views
 100
 
Anthropogony by virtue of ice and cold
 100
 
An unacceptable theory
 101
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VIII.
 
 
CONCLUSION OF PART THIRD.
 
 
A word from Principal Dawson
 102
 
Summary of results thus far
 102
 
An unexpected reinforcement
 103
 
"Where did Life Begin?"
 103
 
Confirmatory extracts
 104
 
p. xvii
 
 
 
 
 
PART FOURTH.
 
 
THE HYPOTHESIS CONFIRMED BY ETHNIC TRADITION.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
ANCIENT COSMOLOGY AND MYTHICAL GEOGRAPHY.
 
 
The mistaken modern assumption
 117
 
The "True Key"
 120
 
General statement
 121
 
The "Mountain of the World"
 123
 
The same in Egyptian Mythology
 124
 
In the Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian
 126
 
In the Chinese
 128
 
Lithe Indo-Aryan
 129
 
In the Buddhistic
 131
 
In the Iranian
 133
 
In the Greek and Roman
 135
 
The Underworld
 137
 
Cautions as to interpretation
 137
 
The chorography of Christian hymns
 138
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN ANCIENT JAPANESE THOUGHT.
 
 
The most ancient Japanese book
 140
 
Japanese cosmogony
 140
 
Izanagi's spear
 140
 
"The Island of the Congealed Drop"
 141
 
Sir Edward Reed places it at the Pole
 141
 
Mr. Griffis reaches the same conclusion
 141
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER III.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN CHINESE THOUGHT.
 
 
The Tauist paradise
 143
 
Descriptions
 143
 
The stupendous world-pillar
 144
 
Connects the terrestrial and celestial paradises
 145
 
Same idea in the Talmud
 145
 
"The Strength of the Hill of Sion"
 145
 
Shang-te's upper and lower palaces
 146
 
At the celestial and terrestrial Poles
 146
 
p. xviii
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER IV.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN EAST ARYAN OR HINDU THOUGHT.
 
 
The world of the Brahmans
 148
 
The abode of Yama
 149
 
The varshas of the upper world
 150
 
The northward journey to Mount Meru
 150
 
The descent to Uttarakuru
 151
 
Illustrations of the Puranic world
 151
 
Ilâvrita, the Hindu's Eden
 151
 
Its north polar position
 151
 
Lenormant's language
 151
 
Ritter's unwitting testimony
 154
 
"The polar region is Meru"
 154
 
"Meru the Garden of the Tree of Life"
 154
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER V.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN IRANIAN OR OLD-PERSIAN THOUGHT.
 
 
The primitive pair and their abode
 155
 
Key to the Iranian cosmography
 155
 
The Chinvat Bridge
 155
 
Current misinterpretations
 156
 
Twelve questions answered
 156
 
True nature of the bridge
 158
 
Its position
 158
 
Position of Kvanîras
 158
 
The mythic geography of the Persians
 159
 
Diagram of the Keshvares
 159
 
Polar position of "Iran the Ancient"
 161
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VI.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN AKKADIAN, ASSYRIAN, AND BABYLONIAN THOUGHT.
 
 
The sacred mountain
 163
 
Chaldæan cosmology
 163
 
Lenormant's exposition
 163
 
Three inconsistencies
 165
 
Location of the world-mountain
 166
 
Lenormant's difficulties
 166
 
The true solution
 168
 
Two Akkads
 168
 
The mount of the Underworld
 169
 
It determines the site of Kharsak
 170
 
And this the site of the Akkadian Eden
 171
 
p. xix
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VII.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN THOUGHT.
 
 
Underestimates of Egyptian science
 172
 
Six theses in Egyptian cosmology
 173
 
Its earth a sphere
 174
 
Northern and southern termini
 174
 
Four supports of heaven at the North
 174
 
A parallel in Buddhist cosmology
 175
 
The southern hemisphere the Underworld
 176
 
The highest North the abode of the gods
 179
 
An interesting hieroglyph
 179
 
Plato's Egyptian Eden-story
 181
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VIII.
 
 
THE CRADLE OF THE RACE IN ANCIENT GREEK THOUGHT
 
 
Supposed discrepancies of tradition
 182
 
Possible agreement
 182
 
A reminiscence of Mount Meru
 183
 
Renan and Lenormant
 183
 
Lost Atlantis
 184
 
Deukalion, a man of the North
 186
 
The Isles of Kronos
 187
 
The Golden Age
 187
 
Wolfgang Menzel's verdict
 187
 
Conclusion and transition
 187
 
 
 
 
PART FIFTH.
 
 
FURTHER VERIFICATIONS OF THE HYPOTHESIS BASED UPON A STUDY OF THE PECULIARITIES OF A POLAR PARADISE.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
THE EDEN STARS.
 
 
Stellar motion at the Pole
 191
 
Has tradition any reminiscence of such?
 191
 
The strange doctrine of Anaxagoras
 191
 
Chaldæan and Egyptian traditions
 193
 
A natural explanation
 194
 
The myth of Phaëthon
 195
 
Iranian and Aztec traditions
 196
 
Result
 196
 
p. xx
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
THE EDEN DAY.
 
 
Length of day at the Pole
 197
 
Sunrise in the South
 197
 
The tradition of the Northmen
 199
 
The tradition of the ancient Persians
 197
 
The tradition of the East Aryans
 198
 
The year-day of Homer
 200
 
The tradition of the Navajos
 201
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER III.
 
 
THE EDEN ZENITH.
 
 
The polar zenith is the Pole
 202
 
This the true heaven of the first men
 202
 
The Hebrew conception
 203
 
The Egyptian conception
 208
 
The Akkadian conception
 209
 
The Assyrio-Babylonian conception
 209
 
The Sabæan conception
 210
 
The Vedic conception
 210
 
The Buddhistic conception
 211
 
The Phœnician conception
 212
 
The Greek conception
 212
 
The Etruscan and Roman conception
 213
 
The Japanese conception
 215
 
The Chinese conception
 215
 
The ancient Germanic conception
 217
 
The ancient Finnic conception
 218
 
How came the Biblical Eden to be in the East?
 219
 
Solution of the problem
 219
 
Confirmations and illustrations
 222
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER IV.
 
 
THE NAVEL OF THE EARTH.
 
 
Prevalence of the expression
 225
 
Its symbolical and commemorative character
 228
 
The Jerusalem earth-centre
 234
 
That of the Greeks
 234
 
That of the Babylonians
 239
 
That of the Hindus
 240
 
p. xxi
 
 
That of the Persians
 243
 
That of the Chinese
 244
 
That of the Japanese
 245
 
That of the Northmen
 246
 
That of the Mexicans
 246
 
That of the Peruvians and others
 247
 
Result
 248
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER V.
 
 
THE QUADRIFURCATE RIVER.
 
 
Origin and nature of this river
 250
 
Sacred hydrography of the Persians
 251
 
All waters have one headspring
 251
 
Also one place of discharge
 251
 
Exposition of the system
 252
 
Similar ideas among the Greeks
 254
 
The Vedic system
 257
 
The Puranic
 259
 
Traces in Christian legend
 260
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VI.
 
 
THE CENTRAL TREE.
 
 
The tree in the midst of the garden
 262
 
Were there two?
 262
 
Its inevitable significance if at the North Pole
 263
 
The Yggdrasil of the Northmen
 264
 
The World-tree of the Akkadians
 264
 
The Tat-pillar of the Egyptians
 265
 
The Winged Oak of the Phœnicians
 266
 
The White Hôm of the Persians
 267
 
The cosmic Aśvattha of the Hindus
 269
 
The holy Palm of the Greeks
 270
 
The Bodhi tree of the Buddhists
 271
 
The Irmensul of the Saxons
 272
 
The Arbre Sec of the Middle Ages
 273
 
The Tong of the Chinese
 274
 
The World-reed of the Navajos
 274
 
The Apple-tree of Avalon
 276
 
The star-bearing World-tree of the Finns
 276
 
p. xxii
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VII.
 
 
THE EXUBERANCE OF LIFE.
 
 
Ethnic traditions of the Earth's deterioration
 279
 
Also of the deterioration of mankind
 281
 
Stature and longevity of primeval men
 281
 
All credible on our hypothesis
 284
 
Language of Professor Nicholson
 285
 
A citation from Figuier
 285
 
The gigantic Sequoia of Arctic origin
 286
 
Animal life in the Tertiary period
 289
 
Primitive forms by no means monstrosities
 294
 
All this wealth of fauna from the North
 297
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER VIII.
 
 
REVIEW OF THE ARGUMENT.
 
 
Nature of the argument
 300
 
Seven tests applicable to any location
 300
 
Seven others peculiar to a location at the Pole
 300
 
A double demonstration
 301
 
Bailly's approximation to the truth
 303
 
Another independent line of evidence
 303
 
Philosophy of previous failures
 304
 
Philosophy of mediæval confusion
 304
 
Patristic descriptions made plain
 305
 
The world of Cosmas Indicopleustes
 305
 
The world of Columbus
 306
 
The world of Dante
 307
 
How highest heaven came to be under foot
 309
 
 
 
 
PART SIXTH.
 
 
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF OUR RESULTS.
 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER I.
 
 
THEIR BEARING UPON THE STUDY OF BIOLOGY AND TERRESTRIAL PHYSICS.
 
 
The sciences immediately affected
 313
 
The services of biology to archæology
 314
 
The services of archæology to biology
 314
 
Narrowness of many biologists
 315
 
Evils thereof
 315
 

 
 
The true corrective
 317
 
The latest generalization of paleontology
 317
 
Anticipated in two Persian myths
 317
 
Terrestrial life-gamut of the Hindus
 319
 
Its lesson to students of the Origin of Life
 319
 
Extraordinary biological conditions
 320
 
Most favorable of all at the Poles
 320
 
Biological superiority of the North Pole
 321
 
Reasons to be more fully investigated
 322
 
Heightened fascination of polar exploration
 325
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER II.
 
 
THE BEARING OF OUR RESULTS ON THE STUDY OF ANCIENT LITERATURE.
 
 
Darwin's primeval man
 326
 
His discovery of the sky
 327
 
And of trees of infinite height
 327
 
The "short memories" of Vedic worshipers
 327
 
Their ocean-producing imaginations
 328
 
Bunbury on Homeric science
 328
 
Exegetical distortions of ancient thought
 328
 
Homer's cosmology re-expounded
 329
 
First, as to the movement of the sun
 329
 
Second, as to the location of Hades
 332
 
Third, as to .the cosmic water-system
 333
 
Fourth, as to the Olympos of the gods
 338
 
Fifth, as to the tall pillars of Atlas
 350
 
The exegetical method dictated by our results
 359
 
Its fruitfulness in the future
 360
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER III.
 
 
THE BEARING OF OUR RESULTS ON THE PROBLEM OF THE ORIGIN AND EARLIEST FORM OF RELIGION.
 
 
The pan-ethnic account
 363
 
Hume's dissent
 364
 
The doctrine of Comte
 369
 
Miller's refutation of primitive fetichism
 370
 
Sir John Lubbock's scheme
 372
 
Refutation by Roskoff and others
 375
 
Caspari's theory
 375
 
The theory of Jules Baissac
 382
 
p. xxiv
 
 
Current approximations of teaching
 385
 
As to the origin of the arts
 386
 
As to intellectual powers of the first men
 386
 
As to their super-fetichistic attitude
 390
 
As to their monogamous family form
 392
 
As to their capacity for monotheism
 397
 
Seven conclusion
 403
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER IV.
 
 
THE BEARING OF OUR. RESULTS ON THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AND ON THE THEORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF CIVILIZATION.
 
 
The apostles of primeval savagery
 407
 
Their doctrine
 407
 
Sub-savage stupidity of the first men
 408
 
Dr. Wilhelm Mannhardt's representation
 409
 
A most important primitive discovery
 410
 
Daphne not a tree
 410
 
Emphatic demand for antediluvian longevity
 410
 
The new Babel
 411
 
Nine memoranda
 411
 
Primeval human history
 418
 
The ancient ethnic view Biblical and true
 419
 
Plato's antediluvian age
 420
 
The consensus of all ancient religions
 422
 
The "Stone Age" in the light of our results
 422
 
Origin of postdiluvian laws and states
 423
 
An imaginary conversation
 424
 
A pagan testimony
 432
 
To those who hear not Moses and the Prophet's
 432
 
Conclusion
 432
 
 
 
 
APPENDIX.
 
 
   I. The Earth of Columbus not a True Sphere
 435
 
  II. How the Earth was Peopled
 437
 
 III. Reception of "The True Key"
 450
 
  IV. The Earth and World of the Hindus
 459
 
   V. The World-Pillar of the Rig Veda
 465
 
  VI. Homer's Abode of the Dead
 467
 
 VII. Latest Polar Research
 487
 
VIII. Trustworthiness of Early Tradition
 492
 
  IX. Index of Authors cited
 497
 
   X. Index to the Work
 502
 



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« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2009, 11:26:46 am »

ILLUSTRATIONS.
Key to Ancient Cosmology
 Frontispiece.
 
Night Skies of Eden
 68
 
The Antipodal Polar Mountains
 123
 
The Earth of the Hindus. No. I.
 152
 
The Earth of the Hindus. No. II.
 152
 
The Earth of the Persians
 159
 
The Navel of the Earth
 226
 
The Earth of Columbus
 307
 
The Earth of Dante
 307
 
The World of Homer
 479
 




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« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2009, 11:27:07 am »

http://sacred-texts.com/earth/pf/pf03.htm
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« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2009, 01:15:00 am »

p. 1

PART FIRST.
LOCATION OF EDEN: STATE OF THE QUESTION.
CHAP.
 
 
I.
 RESULTS OF THE EXPLORERS, HISTORIC AND LEGENDARY.
 
II.
 RESULTS OF THE THEOLOGIANS.
 
III.
 RESULTS OF NON-THEOLOGICAL SCHOLARS: NATURALISTS, ETHNOLOGISTS, ARCHÆOLOGISTS, etc.
 

p. 2

You shall understand that no mortal may approach to that Paradise; for by land no man may go, for wild beasts that are in the deserts, and for the high mountains and great huge rocks that no man may pass by for the dark places that are there; and by the rivers may no man go, for the water runs so roughly and so sharply, because it comes down so outrageously from the high places above, that it runs in so great waves that no ship may row or sail against it; and the water roars so, and makes so huge a noise, and so great a tempest, that no man may hear another in the ship though he cried with all the might he could. Many great lords have assayed with great will many times to pass by those rivers towards Paradise, with full great companies; but they might not speed in their voyage; and many died for weariness of rowing against the strong waves; and many of them became blind, and many deaf, from the noise of the water; and some perished and were lost in the waves; so that no mortal man may approach to that place without the special grace of God.—Sir John de Maundeville.
 

p. 3

CHAPTER I.
THE RESULTS OF EXPLORERS, HISTORIC AND LEGENDARY.
Man lernt die Welt am besten durch Reisen kennen.
                                                   K. H. W. VÖLCKER.

One of the most interesting and pathetic passages to be found in all literature is that in which Christopher Columbus announces to his royal patrons his supposed discovery of the ascent to the gate of the long-lost Garden of Eden. With what emotions must his heart have thrilled as, steering up this ascent, he felt his "ships smoothly rising toward the sky," the weather becoming "milder" as he rose! To be so near the Paradise of God's own planting, to be the first discoverer of the way in which the believing world could at length, after so many ages, once more approach its sacred precincts even if forbidden to enter,—what an exquisite experience it must have been to the lonely spirit of that great explorer!

It is his third voyage. He is in the Gulf of Paria to the north or north-west of the mouth of the Orinoco. In his loyal epistle to Ferdinand and Isabella thus he writes:—

 

The Holy Scriptures record that our Lord made the earthly Paradise and planted in it the tree of life; and thence springs a fountain from which the four principal rivers of the world take their source; namely, the

p. 4

[paragraph continues] Ganges in India, the Tigris and Euphrates, and the Nile.

I do not find, nor ever have found, any account by the Romans or Greeks which fixes in a positive manner the site of the terrestrial Paradise, neither have I seen it given in any mappe-monde, laid down from authentic sources. Some placed it in Ethiopia at the sources of the Nile, but others, traversing all these countries, found neither the temperature nor the altitude of the sun correspond with their ideas respecting it; nor did it appear that the overwhelming waters of the deluge had been there. Some pagans pretended to adduce arguments to establish that it was in the Fortunate Islands, now called the Canaries.

St. Isidore, Bede, and Strabo 1 and the Master of scholastic history, 2 with St. Ambrose and Scotus, and all the learned theologians agree that the earthly Paradise is in the East.

I have already described my ideas concerning this hemisphere and its form, 3 and I have no doubt that if I could pass below the equinoctial line after reaching the highest point of which I have spoken, I should find a much milder temperature and a variation in the stars and in the water: not that I suppose that elevated point to be navigable, nor even that there is water there; indeed, I believe it is impossible to ascend thither, because I am convinced that it is the spot of the earthly Paradise, whither no one can go but by God's permission; but this land which your Highnesses have now sent me to explore is very extensive, and I think there are many other countries in the south, of which the world has never had any knowledge.

I do not suppose that the earthly Paradise is in the form of a rugged mountain, as the descriptions of it have made it appear, but that it is on the summit of the spot




p. 5

which I have described as being in the form of the stalk [or stem end] of a pear; the approach to it from a distance must be by a constant and gradual ascent; but I believe that, as I have already said, no one could ever reach the top; I think also that the water I have described may proceed from it, though it be far off, and that stopping at the place I have just left, it forms this lake.

There are great indications of this being the terrestrial Paradise, for its situation coincides with the opinions of the holy and wise theologians whom I have mentioned; and, moreover, the other evidences agree with the supposition, for I have never either read or heard of fresh water coming in so large a quantity, in close conjunction with the water of the sea; the idea is also corroborated by the blandness of the temperature; and if the water of which I speak does not proceed from the earthly Paradise, it seems to be a still greater wonder, for I do not believe that there is any river in the world so large and deep.

When I left the Dragon's Mouth, which is the northernmost of the two straits which I have described, and which I so named on the day of our lady of August, 1 I found that the sea ran so strongly to the westward that between the hour of mass, 2 when I weighed anchor, and the hour of complines 3 I made sixty-five leagues of four miles each; and not only was the wind not violent, but on the contrary very gentle, which confirmed me in the conclusion that in sailing southward there is a continuous ascent, while there is a corresponding descent towards the north.

I hold it for certain that the waters of the sea move from east to west with the sky, and that in passing this track they hold to a more rapid course, and have thus eaten away large tracts of land, and hence has resulted this great number of islands; indeed, these islands themselves




p. 6

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