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Shibboleth: A Templar Monitor

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Knight of Jerusalem
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« on: December 26, 2008, 11:16:30 pm »

Shibboleth: A Templar Monitor
by George Cooper Connor
[1894]



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Knight of Jerusalem
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2008, 11:17:02 pm »

This is a nineteenth century 'Monitor' of the American Knights Templar. This is a Masonic organization which has its own distinctive rituals and regalia. While they are not connected directly to the Medieval Templars, they carry on the knightly ideals by charitable works, and sponsoring Masonic youth groups.

Shibboleth is similar in format and organization to other 19th century Masonic literature such as Duncan's Masonic Ritual and Monitor, including the funky woodcuts and 19th century atmosphere. Mixed in with this is historical material on the Templars, stories from the Bible, songs, poetry, sermons, a lot of blank forms for all occasions, and bits of advice. For instance, 'Hints on Templar Banquets' notes: 'Never permit smoking when ladies are present...'

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Knight of Jerusalem
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2008, 11:17:51 pm »

SHIBBOLETH
A TEMPLAR MONITOR
by SIR GEORGE COOPER CONNOR
Fifth Edition
Nashville, Tennessee: Order of the Red Cross
[1894]
Scanned, proofed and formatted at sacred-texts.com by John Bruno Hare, June 2008. This text is in the public domain in the US because it was published prior to 1923.

There was no title page, verso or table of contents in the original book. This title page has been added in standard bibliographic format for the convenience of catalogers from internal evidence in this book. I have also added the subtitle for this online edition—JBH.

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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2008, 11:18:15 pm »

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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2008, 11:18:44 pm »

p. 1 p. 2

p. 3

Dedication.

TO

SIR JOHN P. S. GOBIN,

M. E. Past Grand Master of the Grand Encampment.

To whom I am indebted
for numerous proofs of kindness and sympathy
during the years of our acquaintance,
I dedicate this monitor.


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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2008, 11:19:27 pm »

p. 4 p. 5

PREFACE TO FIFTH EDITION.

The early demand for the Fifth Edition of Shibboleth, a demand the publishers scarcely anticipated in times like these, affords the author an opportunity to add several important matters to the volume, thus rendering it still more valuable to the Order of the Temple. So far as now seen this edition is a complete Monitor.

This edition contains all that appeared in the Fourth Edition, with a few errors corrected, and the Banners of Judah and Persia. There is also added a "Third Appendix," which contains directions for the Reception of Grand Officers; Hints to Eminent Commanders, and Rules of Order; Rituals for Divine Worship; Ritual of a Conclave of Sorrow; Ritual for the Christmas Observance; a Form for Recorder's Minutes; an Arrangement of Asylum and Prelate's Hall; and some Hints on Templar Banquets.

This Monitor reaches farther in its helpfulness than any that has been prepared heretofore. But it has not attempted to describe the Robes, and other equipments not universally accepted by the Order. Many requests have been made for the insertion of such descriptive matter, and the requests have been declined in the interests of peace. Such an attempt would develop acrimonious controversies.

My thanks are due, and they are hereby returned to the Fratres all over the Union, from Maine to Mexico, and the Atlantic to the Pacific, for the kind reception given the former editions of this Monitor, and for the many valuable hints received from all sources. It is the author's sincere desire to make this volume complete in all respects, and he will still be grateful for all suggestions looking to such completeness.


Chattanooga, Tenn., Feb. 10, 1894.
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2008, 11:19:59 pm »

p. 6

NOTE BY THE PUBLISHERS.

So far as known, the foregoing Preface is the last word written by Sir George Cooper Connor, the author of this volume. Only a few days later he was forced by disease to the chamber of death, which he never again left until the end came.

The expression of his thanks in the last paragraph may therefore be taken as his loving farewell to his brethren; and it is believed that his earnest desire to provide a Monitor that should be complete and helpful to the members of the Order has been fully realized in this new edition of Shibboleth, to the preparation of which were given the last of his labors on earth.


Nashville, Tenn., November 1, 1894.



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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2008, 11:21:18 pm »

THE ILLUSTRIOUS
ORDER OF THE RED CROSS.
Monitorial Instructions, Notes, Comments, and Suggestions.
A FEW HINTS TO COMMANDERS.
It is the earnest desire of the author of this Monitor to discover that all the Commanderies invest the beautiful, instructive and entertaining Order of the Red Cross with the interest its importance demands. The Ritual provides ample opportunity for the display of true dramatic taste, both in robing and in reading. It also presents the great central thought of the Order,—Truth,—as it has never been presented previous to the adoption at Denver.

The feeling had become almost universal that the Order of the Red Cross was of slight importance, and was at best little more than a social observance. Hence the ceremonials were hurried over, the candidate was practically told that it was mere matter of form, and he went away profoundly impressed that the Commandery was indeed a jovial institution. Never was a graver mistake, and the impression so made was more injurious than beneficial. The Ritual now adopted can not fail to correct that erroneous view of the value of the Order.

The Order of the Red Cross should, if possible, be conferred upon classes, and be made the occasion of social intercourse among the members; the healing of wounds, the forming of new bonds of fraternity. The lessons of the ceremonies tend to these noble ends, and by conferring them with the dignity and pathos they merit those ends will be assuredly attained. See with what fervor of gratitude the newly created Companions will hereafter refer to the name they assumed, and the character they represented. There can be no nobler, and if the work is done with the devotion to dramatic effects which the Ritual demands, that name and character will never be forgotten.

p. 8

[paragraph continues] Hence the propriety of the Refection at the close of the work of the Council.

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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2008, 11:22:01 pm »


Commanders will advance the interests of the bodies they govern by securing full paraphernalia and equipments. The robes need not be expensive, but should be appropriate. It is of the greatest importance that the Grand Council, Companion Conductor, Warder and Guards be in Jewish robes and turbans. It is equally important that the Persian Guards should wear a uniform different from that of the 
Order of the Red Cross, an Order not then founded, technically speaking.

The Princes of Persia and the Rulers of Media should wear oriental robes, and the Master of Cavalry should also be in Persian dress. The Sovereign Master, Prince Chancellor and Prince Master of the Palace wear the regulation robes.

The seating of the Princes and Rulers, fully robed, should be in such form as to produce the best effects upon the Jewish Prince. No fixed floor plan can be laid down, because of the variations in the different Audience Chambers. Here Commanders will use their discretion.

In reading the lines of the Addresses be natural above all things. Affect no so-called dramatic or oratorical tones. Invest each scene with earnestness and pathos, as demanded. Allow no frivolous allusions, or undignified liberties to be taken with Z. Play the King according to your best conception of royalty. See that the Means of Recognition are imparted with great care and accuracy. Let the dignified Order of the Red Cross be indeed a preparation for the solemn Order of the Temple.

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« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2008, 11:23:07 pm »

THE BANNER OF THE ORDER.

It is of green color. In its center is a star of seven points, painted on gold, within which is painted the blood-red Cross of the

p. 9

[paragraph continues] Order, surrounded by the Motto: "Magna est Veritas, et Prævalebit." The letters on the arms of the Cross are black.

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« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2008, 11:24:04 pm »


THE RED CROSS OF THE ORDER.

It is of blood-red color, of equal arms and angles, with the letters on the extremities of the arms, D T J L. 

The four arms, thus indicating Deity, Truth, Justice and Liberty, commemorate our faith in God, and in the grand characteristics of the Order.

This Cross is the Jewel of the Order, and may be properly worn by the members thereof, suspended by a green and red ribbon.

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« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2008, 11:24:42 pm »



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« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2008, 11:25:26 pm »

p. 10

ORDER OF THE RED CROSS.

THE learned Sir Alfred Creigh, whose name is a household word among American Knights Templar, used the following language in a report to the Grand Commandery of Pennsylvania, September, 1867:

"The Ritual of the Red Cross was manufactured by Webb and his associates from kindred degrees not of this Order. It requires no argument to demonstrate that this degree has no connection whatever with the orders of Christian knighthood, nor never should have been incorporated into an order whose sublime teachings are of Jesus as the Redeemer of the world—in his mediatorial character, as the way, the truth and the life."

The equally scholarly and thoughtful Sir George S. Blackie made a report to the Grand Commandery of Tennessee, May 9, 1871, in which he used the following strong language:

"The inconsistency is glaring—the ceremonies are foreign to Christian knighthood. How utterly out of place does the Christian candidate appear when, as a preliminary to the glorious truths of the New Testament, he is introduced to a Jewish Sanhedrin, captured by pagan soldiers, and after having been entertained with an apocryphal legend at the banquet of a pagan monarch, he is sent out into the world without having heard of the name of Christ."

The unanimous adoption of the revised Ritual of the Illustrious Order of the Red Cross by the Grand Encampment, in Denver, on August 10, 1892, explains and settles the misconceptions of these dear Fratres forever, and yet a few words may not be out of place at this time.

The Illustrious Order of the Red Cross is not a pagan rite, nor is it a mere social observance. It is an Order founded upon Truth, recognizing the God of Truth as the only one true and living God. As such it is a proper preparation for the solemnities of the Order of the Temple.

Darius believed in the same one that Israel did when he registered a vow with that God to rebuild His Temple in the destroyed

p. 11

city of Jerusalem. No doubt he registered that vow under the promptings of his Jewish friend, Prince Zerubbabel, who was the recognized Chosen of God. Darius kept that vow, demonstrating his love of Truth and his reverence for Judah's Jehovah.

The most exalted Truth was present implicitly, in Judaism, and the Law of Judaism was the schoolmaster that brought us to Christianity. The most exalted Truth is now explicit in Christianity. In Judaism it was the seed, then the blade, and then Christianity ripened it into the ear. So is the Truth of all truths implicitly in the Order of the Red Cross, and the candidate finds that same truth, but explicitly, in the Order of the Temple.

As Judaism was a preparation for Christianity, so let, the Illustrious Order of the Red Cross be a preparation for the Christian Order of the Temple.

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« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2008, 11:25:54 pm »

HISTORICAL SKETCH.

The Scriptures inform us that for their own sins, and those of their forefathers, the Jewish people were led into captivity by Nebuzaradan, chief Captain of Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon. As slaves they tilled the valleys of the Euphrates, and of the Tigris, until Cyrus destroyed the Chaldean dynasty.

During that captivity Zerubbabel, Crown Prince of the House of Judah, and Darius, son of Hystaspes, formed an alliance of friendship which was probably terminated with death only.

One of the first acts of the conqueror Cyrus was the liberation of the Jewish captives; he then permitted them to return to Judea, that they might rebuild the city of Jerusalem and its Temple, which Nebuchadnezzar had destroyed.

The foundation stone of the Second Temple was laid 535 years before Christ; Zerubbabel, the Royal Prince, Joshua, the High Priest, and Haggai, the Prophet, laying the same.

Cyrus died, and his son, Cambyses, succeeded him on the Medo-Persian throne. On complaint of the Cutheans, and other contiguous tribes, Cambyses commanded the work upon the city and Temple to cease. During the nine years that followed, scarcely anything was done on the walls of Jerusalem, or its Temple.

Cambyses died and the Magians seized the throne, from which their usurper was driven with great slaughter, in a little over a year. Then the Seven Great Families of Persia laid hold of the government, and Darius ascended the throne. He appointed Zerubbabel,

p. 12

his friend, to be the Governor of the Jews that had returned to Jerusalem under the decree of the great Cyrus, and afterwards made him stand in the royal bed-chamber, as the Guard of his body. There were three of these Guards, and they were chosen because of the monarch's implicit confidence in their loyalty.

Fifteen years after the Jews had laid the foundation of the Second Temple they were forced to call a Grand Council to consult about the state of the country. Cambyses was dead, and the Magian usurper, Smerdis, had been driven from the throne, to give place to Darius, son of Hystaspes, whose favoring of the Jews was believed to be almost as marked as was that of the great Cyrus.

Darius spread a feast at his capital, and invited thereto the Princes of Persia and the Rulers of the Medes. That feast having been thoroughly enjoyed, "they every one departed to go to bed at their own houses, and Darius, the King, went to bed."

The King slept lightly, and awakening he fell into conversation with his three Guards. He suggested, as a part of the festivities of the morrow, that they three engage in a public discussion of some interesting question, as had been the custom on similar occasions from time immemorial, and that he would reward with a princely gift the successful contestant. The King then proposed the following question:

"Whether Wine was not the strongest? Whether Kings were not such? Whether Women were not such, or whether Truth was not strongest of all?"

Esdras makes the Guards suggest both the questions and the prize, but we follow the story as related by Josephus.

Again the King slept, and the Guards prepared for the contest of the morning. When the King arose he sent for the Princes and Rulers to meet him in the Audience Chamber, and witness the contest between his Guards.

This contest began, in time, by one of the Guards declaiming in favor of the strength of Wine, followed by another in favor of the power of the King. Then the Jew, Zerubbabel, contended for the supremacy of Woman, concluding with a noble deliverance in favor of Truth.

The brilliant assembly burst forth into applause when Zerubbabel concluded, and the King awarded him the prize in these words: "Ask for somewhat over and above what I have promised, for I would give it unto you because of your wisdom."

p. 13

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« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2008, 11:26:12 pm »

Then "Zerubbabel put him in mind of the vow he had made in case he should ever have the kingdom. Now this vow was to build Jerusalem, and to rebuild therein the Temple of God, as also to restore the vessels which Nebuchadnezzar had pillaged and carried to Babylon."

And behold the King was pleased to arise and to kiss his eloquent Guard, and to grant his request. Zerubbabel returned to his people in Jerusalem with great joy, and the rebuilding of the city and Temple was immediately resumed. Darius not only kept his vow, but he made large contributions to the rebuilding out of the royal treasury.

The details adapted to more beautifully round out the drama, and to more pointedly teach the lesson of the almighty force and the importance of Truth are esoteric.

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