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Sephardic Jews Leave Genetic Legacy In Spain - HISTORY

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Author Topic: Sephardic Jews Leave Genetic Legacy In Spain - HISTORY  (Read 5113 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #60 on: December 08, 2008, 11:31:34 am »



Torah finials, 1883, Livorno, Italy, at the current show at Museo ItaloAmericano:
"Il Ghetto: Forging Italian Jewish Identities 1516 - 1870",
being exhibited at Fort Mason in San Francisco, Cailf.

(Liz Hafalia
/ The Chronicle)
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Bianca
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« Reply #61 on: December 08, 2008, 05:18:38 pm »







                                             

PROBABLY THE MOST BELOVED OF ROMAN FOODS IS ' CARCIOFI ALL GIUDIA' - 'ARTICHOKES, JEWISH-STYLE'









Before the Diaspora, however, there was a community living in Rome, the oldest continual Jewish settlement in the history of Europe, always part of the cultural landscape, always living in isolation of one kind or another. 



                                           Jewish food was and is Roman food. 



Today, within the world of Jews in Italy, there are several smaller worlds: those of the native Italian Jews, of the Sephardim driven out of Spain, and of the Ashkenazim moving down from Germany and Eastern Europe.

Italian food prevails and Jewish food remains Roman food.



http://www.inmamaskitchen.com/FOOD_IS_ART_II/food_history_and_facts/Jewish_Cooking.html
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 05:29:13 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #62 on: January 14, 2009, 12:34:26 pm »





             


 





                                  VENICE : Bigoli in salsa (whole grain spaghetti in anchovy sauce)

 
 
 
 
 
From The Jewish Chronicle
Silvia Nacamulli
November 13, 2008

My paternal grandfather, Nonno Bino, was originally from the ghetto of Venice and came to Rome in the 1930s to find a job and a wife. He married my grandmother (Nonna Bianca) and worked with her in the family business - at the time a small shop selling glass and ceramic household products. I cherish my Venetian origins, and Venetian Jewish cooking is one of the richest cuisines in Italy. In fact, Venice had Ashkenazi, Sephardi and Italian Jews living together, and as a result the food in the ghettos was varied, exotic and cosmopolitan.

This recipe is a staple of Venetian Jewish cooking, even if its Jewish origins are often forgotten. Bigoli is Venetian pasta originally made with buckwheat flour, but is now more commonly made with whole wheat flour. It is a little thicker than the traditional spaghetti and its texture is rough, allowing the sauce to be more easily absorbed. I am using wholegrain spaghetti here as it is similar to bigoli and more easily available. Wholegrain spaghetti has a nutty flavour, which goes very well with the anchovies.

You may find out that even people who don't like anchovies often like this recipe - somehow the combination of the onions, parsley and wholegrain pasta balance-out the anchovies, creating a rich flavour.

Silvia's website is www.cookingforthesoul.com

Preparation time: 20 minutes.Serves 6 as starter or 4 as a main

Ingredients
500g wholemeal spaghetti
100g anchovy fillets
finely chopped
100ml extra virgin olive oil
3 finely chopped onions
Bunch of finely
chopped parsley
2 litres water
A handful of rock salt
Black pepper to taste

Method
 Heat up the olive oil and the onion in a large non stick frying pan.
 Leave to cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes until the onion is soft. To help in the process, add a few tablespoons of warm water and leave it to evaporate.
 Once the water has evaporated add half the parsley, then stir and leave the onion to turn golden.
 Finely chop the anchovy fillets and add these to the frying pan together with some black pepper. Mix thoroughly with the onions and leave to cook for 3-4 minutes, adding the rest of the parsley at the last minute.
 While the sauce is cooking, bring the water to a boil in a large saucepan. When it boils add a handful of sea salt and drop in the spaghetti. Stir well and leave to cook for as long as the package says or until al dente.
 TIP: Before draining the pasta, take a large cup of boiling water from the saucepan and put to one side.
 Drain the pasta and add it to the frying pan with the anchovy sauce on medium heat. Mix thoroughly until the pasta is coated with the sauce. If your frying pan is not big enough then use a large bowl instead.
 While stirring, slowly add some of the water you put to one side earlier and let it absorb until it's creamy.
 Add more olive oil if needed, ground black pepper to taste, stir thoroughly and serve immediately.




Last updated: 11:43am, November 13 2008
« Last Edit: January 14, 2009, 12:41:00 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #63 on: April 13, 2009, 03:15:44 pm »



From left, Italia Tagliacozzo, Ester Di Segni, Emma Di Segni, earthquake survivor Nello De Bernardinis and Alberto Di Consiglio, pose for a group photo in the Casentino tent-camp, near L'Aquila, central Italy, Monday, April 13, 2009.

 Italian Jews and Holocaust survivors are rushing to aid communities that sheltered them during World War II and were hit by last week's devastating earthquake. Di Consiglio found Nello De Bernardinis, 74, the son of a couple who sheltered Di Consiglio's father and eight other relatives during the war.

(AP Photo/
Sandro Perozzi)








                                            Italian Jews aid World War II saviors hit by quake
           





Ariel David,
Associated Press Writer
April 13, 2009
FOSSA,
Italy

More than 65 years after villagers provided shelter to Italian Jews fleeing from the Nazis, a group of those who evaded capture rushed to repay that sacrifice in rural communities hard-hit by an earthquake.

A delegation of around 20 elderly Jews and their descendants as well as community leaders made their way to makeshift camps in the area around the mountain city of L'Aquila on Monday, peering into tents in a bid to find their saviors.

They offered everything from gym shoes to summer camps for children.

"I wouldn't be here if it weren't for these people," said Alberto Di Consiglio, whose parents were sheltered in the small hamlets of Fossa and Casentino during the war. "We have to help them."

More than 100 tent cities have been built around L'Aquila and the 26 towns and villages affected by the 6.3-magnitude quake, which struck central Italy on April 6.

The temblor killed 294 people and displaced another 55,000, damaging or destroying up to 15,000 buildings. Most of the homeless could spend weeks or months in tents as authorities have so far examined only 1,000 buildings, and declared 30 percent of those uninhabitable.

In the chaos of the relief efforts, Jews who had been sheltered in the area during the war lost touch with villagers, many of whom are simple farmers with no cell phones.

At least five Jewish families, around 30 people, took shelter in the small mountainside villages of Fossa and Casentino in mid-1943, when German forces began to take direct control of central and northern Italy. They remained there until the arrival of the Allies a year later.

In October 1943, a few weeks after the families left their native Rome, Nazi troops swept in on the capital's Old Ghetto neighborhood deporting more than 2,000 Jews. Only a handful survived the death camps.

The runaways initially hid in Fossa, about 10 miles (16 kilometers) from L'Aquila, but were forced to flee to the nearby village of Casentino when warned the Germans had learned of their presence.

"We left at night, it was winter and the snow was up to here," Emma Di Segni said, gesturing to her waist. "We stayed in a ruined house until a woman took us in."

Though they had fake documents and posed as refugees fleeing Allied bombings, their hosts knew who they were and were aware they could be executed if caught sheltering Jews, Di Segni said.

"They knew what they risked, but they never said anything," she recalled.

Di Segni is in contact with descendants of her saviors now living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but she came to the tent camp set up outside Casentino to look for their next-door neighbors.

Officials provided a cell phone number for the family, who were out for the day. Di Segni cried into the phone as she made sure everyone was safe and invited them to stay at her home in Rome.

In one tent, Di Consiglio managed to find Nello De Bernardinis, 74, the son of the couple who sheltered Di Consiglio's father and eight other relatives during the war.

"It's so painful that such righteous people should suffer like this and live in a tent," Di Consiglio said. He reminisced how his aunt was born in the barn of the De Bernardinis and was baptized in the church to avoid suspicion from authorities.

With aftershocks still hitting the area Monday, Casentino was off-limits, but locals and visitors pointed out the now crumbled-church and the other ruined buildings in the village.

"Those were difficult times, like today," said De Bernardinis. "The Germans were always looking for Jews and we did what we could."

De Bernardinis said he was fine for the moment and greatly appreciated the gesture of the Jewish community to check in on him and his family. He said, though, that it would be useful to have help during harvest time, and Di Consiglio promised his whole family would come.

Riccardo Pacifici, the head of Rome's small community, said that the capital's Jews, which number less than 15,000, were already collecting money and clothing for all quake victims, but wanted to do more especially for communities that had helped during the war.

Luigi Calvisi, the mayor of Fossa which lost five people to the quake and was heavily damaged asked for sneakers for children. Holding talks with Pacifici in the tent camp where more than half of Fossa's 700 residents live, he also welcomed offers of specialized assistance for the elderly and a vacation for the young at a summer camp in Tuscany.

Pacifici said he would also work to get recognition from Jerusalem's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial for people like De Bernardinis and others who sheltered Roman Jews. The memorial bestows a special honor on those who saved Jews during World War II.

Irena Steinfeldt, director of the Righteous Among the Nations department at Yad Vashem, said the museum was not familiar with the stories of Fossa and Casentino. She urged the Jewish families to come forward.

"We want to hear these stories," Steinfeldt said. "I would be happy if the families contacted Yad Vashem and told us."

Other stories of Jews being saved in the same area were recorded, she said, usually involving Jews who fled from Rome to nearby villages.

The aid brought by saved Jews to the quake zone came in parallel with help from Germany, which has offered to rebuild the church of Onna, a village that was nearly flattened by the temblor. The hamlet was the site of a massacre of civilians by German troops in 1944, but a Foreign Ministry spokeswoman stressed that the event was not the reason the place had been chosen.

___



Associated Press reporters

Matt Moore
in Berlin and

Matti Friedman
in Jerusalem

contributed to this report.
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Bianca
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« Reply #64 on: April 13, 2009, 03:20:12 pm »








Emma Di Segni, left, reacts as Italia Tagliacozzo talks on the phone with earthquake survivors Luisa e Giovanni Sarra, whose family sheltered their families during World War II, in the Casentino tent-camp, near L'Aquila, central Italy, Monday, April 13, 2009.

Italian Jews and Holocaust survivors are rushing to aid communities that sheltered them during World War II and were hit by last week's devastating earthquake.


(AP Photo/
Sandro Perozzi)
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« Reply #65 on: April 13, 2009, 03:22:43 pm »








Emma Di Segni reacts after talking on the phone with earthquake survivors Luisa e Giovanni Sarra, whose family sheltered her family during World War II, in the Casentino tent-camp, near L'Aquila, central Italy, Monday, April 13, 2009.

Italian Jews and Holocaust survivors are rushing to aid communities that sheltered them during World War II and were hit by last week's devastating earthquake.


(AP Photo/
Sandro Perozzi)
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« Reply #66 on: April 13, 2009, 03:24:33 pm »








Emma Di Segni points to the house of the Sarra family, where she and her family were sheltered during World War II, in Casentino, near L'Aquila, central Italy, Monday, April 13, 2009.

Italian Jews and Holocaust survivors are rushing to aid communities that sheltered them during World War II and were hit by last week's devastating earthquake. The Sarra family are earthquake survivors.


(AP Photo/
Sandro Perozzi)
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« Reply #67 on: April 23, 2009, 07:03:34 am »









Italian neurologist and senator for life Rita Levi Montalcini, Nobel Prize winner for Medicine in 1986, seen with
a glass, at the end of a press conference for her one hundredth birthday in Rome, Saturday April 18, 2009.

Montalcini will be 100 years old on April 22. The Italian scientist received the Nobel prize for medicine with
Stanley Cohen of the United States, in 1986, for discoveries of mechanisms that regulate the growth of cells
and organs.

(AP Photo/
Riccardo De Luca)
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« Reply #68 on: April 23, 2009, 07:05:23 am »










                              Italian scientist Rita Levi Montalcini, turning 100, still works






AP
APRIL 18, 2009
ROME

Rita Levi Montalcini, Nobel Prize-winning scientist, said Saturday that even though she is about to turn 100,
her mind is sharper than it was she when she was 20.

Levi Montalcini, who also serves as a senator for life in Italy, celebrates her 100th birthday on Wednesday, and she spoke at a ceremony held in her honor by the European Brain Research Institute.

She shared the 1986 Nobel Prize for Medicine with American Stanley Cohen for discovering mechanisms that regulate the growth of cells and organs.

"At 100, I have a mind that is superior thanks to experience than when I was 20," she told the party, complete with a large cake for her.

The Turin-born Levi Montalcini recounted how the anti-Jewish laws of the 1930s under Benito Mussolini's Fascist regime forced her to quit university and do research in an improvised laboratory in her bedroom at home.

"Above all, don't fear difficult moments," she said. "The best comes from them."

"I should thank Mussolini for having declared me to be of an inferior race. This led me to the joy of working, not any more unfortunately, in university institutes but in a bedroom," the scientist said.

Her white hair elegantly coifed and wearing a smart navy blue suit, she raised a glass of sparkling wine in a toast to her long life.
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« Reply #69 on: April 23, 2009, 07:06:38 am »










                                                       Montalcini feted at 100



                                                'Incredible gifts' of research funding






(ANSA) - Rome,
April 22, 2009

- Nobel prize winning scientist Rita Levi Montalcini was feted Wednesday as she turned 100 with a gala party at Rome's city hall.

For the occasion, Education Minister Mariastella Gelmini announced six million euros of funding to keep young researchers in Italy and an extra half million euros to keep Montalcini's brain research lab Ebri going.

''I would never have dreamed of such incredible gifts,'' said Montalcini, stressing that she devoted years to stemming Italy's brain drain and recalling her 15 years ''in exile'' in the United States.

Among those celebrating Montalcini at the ceremony hosted by Rome Mayor Gianni Alemanno was Stanley Cohen, the US scientist with whom she shared the 1986 Nobel Prize in Medicine for their discovery of Nerve Growth Factor in the peripheral nervous system.

''We worked together for so many years and never argued,'' said Cohen, 86.

Asked last week to disclose the secret behind her long and healthy life, Montalcini said: ''Be happy to be alive and to be of service to others''.

''Perhaps the secret is to totally forget about yourself''.

In the past, the outspoken scientist has come out against obliging people to retire, something she defined as ''pre-death'', and has sharply criticised government spending cuts to scientific research and development.

She also bashed conservatives and the Church for opposing embryo research and accused fellow scientists of being co-responsible for the development of lethal high-tech weapons.

Montalcini was born in Turin on April 22, 1909 and obtained an honours degree in medicine and surgery from the city university in 1936.

Two of her university colleagues and close friends were Salvador Luria and Renato Dulbecco, who were later to receive the Nobel prizes in physiology and medicine, respectively.

After specialising in neurology and psychiatry she began work as a university assistant but, in 1938, was forced by Fascist religious persecution laws to leave her job.

Undeterred, she continued her research from her home.

Her most important work was carried out during her stay at Washington University in St Louis, Missouri.

She is a member of numerous scientific academies, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of London and was the first woman to be admitted to Italy's Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in 1976.

In 2001, she revealed she had lost her eyesight but would continue working because her path was illuminated by the ''light of science''.
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