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SARGASSO SEA, BERMUDA TRIANGLE AND THEIR MYSTERIES

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Author Topic: SARGASSO SEA, BERMUDA TRIANGLE AND THEIR MYSTERIES  (Read 9163 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2008, 06:23:44 pm »









                                                        A C T S   O F   M A N






Human error



One of the most cited explanations in official inquiries as to the loss of any aircraft or vessel is human error.

Whether deliberate or accidental, humans have been known to make mistakes resulting in catastrophe, and losses within the Bermuda Triangle are no exception. For example, the Coast Guard cited a lack of proper training for the cleaning of volatile benzene residue as a reason for the loss of the tanker V.A. Fogg in 1972.

Human stubbornness may have caused businessman Harvey Conover to lose his sailing yacht, the Revonoc, as he sailed into the teeth of a storm south of Florida on January 1, 1958.

Many losses remain inconclusive due to the lack of wreckage which could be studied, a fact cited on many official reports.






Deliberate acts of destruction



This can fall into two categories:


acts of war,

and acts of piracy.


Records in enemy files have been checked for numerous losses; while many sinkings have been attributed to surface raiders or submarines during the World Wars and documented in the various command log books, many others which have been suspected as falling in that category have not been proven; it is suspected that the loss of USS Cyclops in 1918, as well as her sister ships Proteus and Nereus in World War II, were attributed to submarines, but no such link has been found in the German records.

Piracy, as defined by the taking of a ship or small boat on the high seas, is an act which continues to this day.

While piracy for cargo theft is more common in the western Pacific and Indian oceans, drug smugglers do steal pleasure boats for smuggling operations, and may have been involved in crew and yacht disappearances in the Caribbean.

Historically famous pirates of the Caribbean (where piracy was common from about 1560 to the 1760s) include Edward Teach (Blackbeard) and Jean Lafitte. Lafitte is sometimes said to be a Triangle victim himself.

Another form of pirate operated on dry land.

Bankers or wreckers would shine a light on shore to misdirect ships, which would then founder on the shore; the wreckers would then help themselves to the cargo. It is possible that these wreckers also killed any crew who protested.

Nags Head, North Carolina, was named for the wreckers' practice of hanging a lantern on the head of
a hobbled horse as it walked along the beach.
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« Reply #16 on: December 02, 2008, 06:26:51 pm »









                                                  P O P U L A R   T H E O R I E S






Triangle writers have used a number of supernatural theories to explain the events.

One explanation pins the blame on leftover technology from the mythical lost continent of Atlantis.

Sometimes connected to the Atlantis story is the submerged rock formation known as the Bimini Road off the island of Bimini in the Bahamas, which is in the Triangle by some definitions.

Followers of the psychic Edgar Cayce take his prediction that evidence of Atlantis would be found in 1968 as referring to the discovery of the Bimini Road. Believers describe the formation as a road, wall,
or other structure, though geologists consider it to be of natural origin.

Other writers attribute the events to UFOs. This idea was used by Steven Spielberg for his film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, which features the lost Flight 19 as alien abductees.

Charles Berlitz, grandson of a distinguished linguist and author of various additional books on anomalous phenomena, has kept in line with this extraordinary explanation, and attributed the losses in the Triangle to anomalous or unexplained forces.



Retrieved from
Wikipedia.org
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« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2008, 06:31:10 pm »








THE FOLLOWING ARE ACCOUNTS OF 'MISSING' VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT AS GIVEN BY

WIKIPEDIA.ORG.



IT IS UP TO THE READER TO REACH A CONCLUSION......
« Last Edit: December 02, 2008, 07:41:54 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2008, 06:31:37 pm »


US Navy TBF Grumman Avenger flight, similar to Flight 19.
This photo had been used by various Triangle authors to
illustrate Flight 19 itself. (US Navy)






                                                                    Flight 19





Flight 19 was a training flight of TBM Avenger bombers that went missing on December 5, 1945 while over the Atlantic. The impression is given that the flight encountered unusual phenomena and anomalous compass readings, and that the flight took place on a calm day under the leadership of an experienced pilot, Lt. Charles Carroll Taylor. Adding to the intrigue is that the Navy's report of the accident was ascribed to "causes or reasons unknown."

It is believed that Charles Taylor's mother wanted to save Charles's reputation, so she made them write "reasons unknown" when actually Charles was 50 km NW from where he thought he was.



While the basic facts of this version of the story are essentially accurate, some important details are missing.

The weather was becoming stormy by the end of the incident; only Lt. Taylor had any significant flying time, but he was not familiar with the south Florida area and had a history of getting lost in flight, having done so three times during World War II, and being forced to ditch his planes twice into the water; and naval reports and written recordings of the conversations between Lt. Taylor and the other pilots of Flight 19 do not indicate magnetic problems.
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« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2008, 06:33:50 pm »



Brigantine similar to the

Mary Celeste










Mary Celeste



The mysterious abandonment in 1872 of the Mary Celeste is often but inaccurately connected to the Triangle,
the ship having been abandoned off the coast of Portugal.

Many theories have been put forth over the years to explain the abandonment, including alcohol fumes from the cargo and insurance fraud.

The event is possibly confused with the sinking of a ship with a similar name, the Mari Celeste, off the coast of Bermuda on September 13, 1864, which is mentioned in the book Bermuda Shipwrecks by Dan Berg.
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« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2008, 06:37:00 pm »



Ellen Austin









The Ellen Austin supposedly came across an abandoned derelict, placed on board a prize crew, and attempted to sail with it to New York in 1881.

According to the stories, the derelict disappeared; others elaborating further that the derelict reappeared minus the prize crew, then disappeared again with a second prize crew on board.

A check of Lloyd's of London records proved the existence of the Meta, built in 1854; in 1880 the
Meta was renamed Ellen Austin.

There are no casualty listings for this vessel, or any vessel at that time, that would suggest a large number of missing men placed on board a derelict which later disappeared.
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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2008, 06:43:56 pm »



Teignmouth Electron, as she was on July 10, 1969









Teignmouth Electron

 Donald Crowhurst
 


Donald Crowhurst was a sailor competing in the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race of 1968-69. His boat, a trimaran named Teignmouth Electron, left England on October 31, 1968; it was found abandoned south of the Azores on July 10, 1969.



Most writers on the Triangle would stop there (only Winer elaborated on the facts), leaving out the evidence recovered from Crowhurst's logbooks which showed deception as to his position in the race and increasing irrationality.

His last entry was June 29; it was assumed he jumped over the side a short time later.









Summary



The Teignmouth Electron found abandoned in the Atlantic, July 10, 1969. (Sunday Times)

Fair use rationale is to illustrate the loss of Donald Crowhurst in the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race of 1968-1969, and as such this photograph is considered to be of fair use for the article it is on.
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« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2008, 06:54:51 pm »



USS Cyclops









USS Cyclops (AC-4)



The incident resulting in the single largest loss of life in the history of the U.S. Navy not related to combat occurred when USS Cyclops under the command of Lieutenant Commander G. W. Worley, went missing without a trace with a crew of 306 sometime after March 4, 1918, after departing the island of Barbados.

Although there is no strong evidence for any theory, storms, capsizing and enemy activity have all been suggested as explanations.
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« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2008, 06:57:01 pm »









Theodosia Burr Alston



Theodosia Burr Alston was the daughter of former United States Vice-President Aaron Burr.

Her disappearance has been cited at least once in relation to the Triangle, in The Bermuda Triangle by Adi-Kent Thomas Jeffrey (1975).





She was a passenger on board the Patriot, which sailed from Charleston, South Carolina to New York City on December 30, 1812, and was never heard from again.

Both Piracy and the War of 1812 have been posited as explanations, as well as a theory placing her in Texas, well outside the Triangle.
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« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2008, 07:01:23 pm »



The Spray








Captain Slocum' "Spray"



Captain Joshua Slocum's skill as a mariner was beyond argument; he was the first man to sail around
the world solo.

In 1909, in his boat Spray he set out in a course to take him through the Caribbean to Venezuela.
He disappeared; there was no evidence he was even in the Triangle when Spray was lost.

It was assumed he was run down by a steamer or struck by a whale, the Spray being too sound a
craft and Slocum too experienced a mariner for any other cause to be considered likely, and in 1924
he was declared legally dead.

While a mystery, there is no known evidence for, or against, paranormal activity.
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« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2008, 07:04:49 pm »











The Carroll A. Deering



(US Coast Guard)A five-masted schooner built in 1919, the Carroll A. Deering was found hard aground and abandoned at Diamond Shoals, near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on January 31, 1921.

Rumors and more at the time indicated the Deering was a victim of piracy, possibly connected with the illegal
rum-running trade during Prohibition, and possibly involving another ship, S.S. Hewitt, which disappeared at
roughly the same time.

Just hours later, an unknown steamer sailed near the lightship along the track of the Deering, and ignored all
signals from the lightship. It is speculated that the Hewitt may have been this mystery ship, and possibly in-
volved in the Deering crew's disappearance.
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« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2008, 07:15:06 pm »



Douglas DC-3









NC16002 disappearance



On December 28, 1948, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, number NC16002, disappeared while on a flight from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Miami. No trace of the aircraft or the 32 people onboard was ever found.

From the documentation compiled by the Civil Aeronautics Board investigation, a possible key to the plane's disappearance was found, but barely touched upon by the Triangle writers:
the plane's batteries were inspected and found to be low on charge, but ordered back into the plane without a recharge by the pilot while in San Juan.

Whether or not this led to complete electrical failure will never be known.

However, since piston-engined aircraft rely upon magnetos to provide electrical power and spark to
their cylinders rather than batteries, this theory is unlikely.
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« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2008, 07:19:28 pm »



Avro Tudor IV
Passenger Aircraft







Star Tiger and Star Ariel



These Avro Tudor IV passenger aircraft disappeared without trace en route to Bermuda and Jamaica, respectively.

Star Tiger was lost on January 30, 1948 on a flight from the Azores to Bermuda. Star Ariel was lost on January 17, 1949, on a flight from Bermuda to Kingston, Jamaica. Neither aircraft gave out a distress call; in fact, their last messages were routine.


A possible clue to their disappearance was found in the mountains of the Andes in 1998: the Star Dust, an Avro Lancastrian airliner run by the same airline, had disappeared on a flight from Buenos Aires, Argentina, to Santiago, Chile on August 2, 1947.

The plane's remains were discovered at the melt end of a glacier, suggesting that either the crew
did not pay attention to their instruments, suffered an instrument failure or did not allow for head-
wind effects from the jetstream on the way to Santiago when it hit a mountain peak, with the
resulting avalanche burying the remains and incorporating it into the glacier.

However, this is mere speculation with regard to the Star Tiger and Star Ariel, pending the recovery
of the aircraft.

It should be noted that the Star Tiger was flying at a height of just 2,000 feet, which would have meant that if the plane was forced down, there would have been no time to send out a distress message. It is also far too low for the jetstream or any other high-altitude wind to have any effect.
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« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2008, 07:21:34 pm »



A KC-135 Stratotanker








KC-135 Stratotankers



On August 28, 1963 a pair of U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft collided and crashed into the Atlantic.

The Triangle version (Winer, Berlitz, Gaddis) of this story specifies that they did collide and crash, but there were two distinct crash sites, separated by over 160 miles of water.

However, Kusche's research showed that the unclassified version of the Air Force investigation report stated that the debris field defining the second "crash site" was examined by a search and rescue ship, and found to be a mass of seaweed and driftwood tangled in an old buoy.
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« Reply #29 on: December 02, 2008, 07:25:26 pm »



SS Marine Sulphur Queen









SS Marine Sulphur Queen



SS Marine Sulphur Queen, a T2 tanker converted from oil to sulfur carrier, was last heard from on February 4, 1963 with a crew of 39 near the Florida Keys.

Marine Sulphur Queen was the first vessel mentioned in Vincent Gaddis' 1964 Argosy Magazine article, but he left it as having "sailed into the unknown", despite the Coast Guard report which not only documented the ship's badly-maintained history, but declared that it was an unseaworthy vessel that should never have gone to sea.
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