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the Statue of Liberty

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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2008, 03:20:00 pm »


First Lady Nancy Reagan waves from the Statue of Liberty after she re opened the structure on its 100th birthday
 
Source http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/photographs/large/c35943-10.jpg
 
Date July 4, 1986


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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2008, 03:21:21 pm »

New torch

A new torch replaced the original in 1986, which was deemed beyond repair because of the extensive 1916 modifications. The 1886 torch is now in the monument's lobby museum. The new torch has gold plating applied to the exterior of the "flame," which is illuminated by external lamps on the surrounding balcony platform.

Dominion resolved by default

In 1987 Representative Frank J. Guarini, a Democrat from New Jersey, and Gerald McCann, who was Mayor of Jersey City, sued New York City, contending that New Jersey should have dominion over Liberty Island because it is in the New Jersey portion of the Hudson River. The federally owned island is about 2,000 feet away from Jersey City and over two miles from New York City.[31] By default—since the court chose not to hear the case—the existing legal status of the portions of the island that are above water was left unchanged. The riparian rights to all of the submerged land surrounding the statue belong to New Jersey, however. The islands of New York harbor have been part of New York since the issuance in 1664 of the atypical colonial charter that created New Jersey, [3] which failed to provide a boundary in the middle of the Hudson river—although the boundary line for the water rights later was moved to the middle of the channel.

The federal park service states that the Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island, which is a federal property that is administered by the National Park Service and that, officially, the island is located within the territorial jurisdiction of the state of New York because of a pact between the state governments of New York and New Jersey that declared a resolution to this issue, which was ratified by Congress in 1834.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 03:23:32 pm by Janelle Spyker » Report Spam   Logged
Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2008, 03:22:13 pm »



Original torch, replaced in 1986
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« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2008, 03:22:48 pm »

Aftermath of 9/11

Liberty Island closed on September 11, 2001; the island reopened in December, the monument reopened on August 3, 2004, but the statue has remained closed. The National Park Service claims that the statue is not shut because of a terrorist threat, but principally because of a long list of fire regulation contraventions, including inadequate evacuation procedures. The museum and ten-story pedestal are open for visitors but are only accessible if visitors have a "Monument Access Pass" which is a reservation that visitors must make in advance of their visit and pick up before boarding the ferry. There are a maximum of 3000 passes available each day (with a total of 15000 visitors to the island daily). The interior of the statue remains closed, although a glass ceiling in the pedestal allows for views of Eiffel's iron framework.

Visitors to Liberty Island and the Statue are subject to restrictions, including personal searches similar to the security found in airports.

The Statue of Liberty had previously been threatened by terrorism, according to the FBI. On February 18, 1965, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced it had uncovered a plot by three commandos from the Black Liberation Front, who were allegedly connected to Cuba, and a female co-conspirator from Montreal connected with the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ), seeking independence for Quebec from Canada, who were sent to destroy the statue and at least two other national monuments — the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia and the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C.

In June 2006, a bill, S. 3597, was proposed in Senate which, if approved, could re-open the crown and interior of the Statue of Liberty to visitors. In July 2007, a similar measure was proposed in the House of Representatives.

On August 9, 2006 National Park Service Director Fran P. Mainella, in a letter to Congressman Anthony D. Weiner of New York stated that the crown and interior of the statue would remain closed indefinitely. The letter stated that "the current access patterns reflect a responsible management strategy in the best interests of all our visitors." Critics contend that closing the Statue of Liberty indefinitely is an overreaction, and that safe access could easily be resumed under tighter security measures.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 03:24:37 pm by Janelle Spyker » Report Spam   Logged
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« Reply #34 on: December 08, 2008, 03:25:30 pm »

Jumps

At 2:45 p.m. on February 2, 1912, steeplejack Frederick R. Law successfully performed a parachute jump from the observation platform surrounding the torch. It was done with the permission of the army captain administering the island. The New York Times reported that he "fell fully seventy-five feet [23 m] like a dead weight, the parachute showing no inclination whatsoever to open at first", but he then descended "gracefully", landed hard, and limped away.

The first suicide was May 13, 1929. The Times reported a witness as saying the man, later identified as Ralph Gleason, crawled out through one of the windows of the crown, turned around as if to return, "seemed to slip" and "shot downward, bouncing off the breast of the statue in the plunge." Gleason was killed when he landed on a patch of grass at the base, just a few feet from a workman who was mowing the grass.

On August 23, 2001, French stuntman Thierry Devaux parasailed onto the monument and got hung up on the statue's torch in a bungled attempt to bungee jump from it. He was not hurt and was charged with four misdemeanor offenses including trespassing.
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« Reply #35 on: December 08, 2008, 03:26:37 pm »

Inscription

The interior of the pedestal contains a bronze plaque inscribed with the poem "The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus. It has never been engraved on the exterior of the pedestal, despite such depictions in editorial cartoons.

Quote
Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

The bronze plaque in the pedestal contains a typographical error: the comma in "Keep, ancient lands" is missing, causing that line to read "'Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!' cries she", and noticeably altering its meaning.

« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 03:27:35 pm by Janelle Spyker » Report Spam   Logged
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« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2008, 08:47:52 pm »

Replicas of the Statue of Liberty


Replica of the Statue of Liberty at New York - New York Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada.

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« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2008, 08:49:05 pm »

Hundreds of other Statues of Liberty have been erected worldwide.

Boy Scouts of America placed a small-scale replica of the Statue of Liberty at the Gentry Building in Columbia, Missouri in 1950. Located at the Parks & Recreation Administration Offices, at 7th and Broadway, the plaque notes that the statue was dedicated as a pledge of everlasting fidelity and loyalty. The local project was a component of the Scouts' national 40th anniversary celebration which had Strengthen the Arm of Liberty as its theme. More than 200 replicas were placed nationally as a result.

There is also a replica statue in the middle of the Susquehanna River near Harrisburg, PA. The statue is almost entirely white as viewed from US-322 East and West going past the river. Another replica, in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, stands at the entrance of Capaha Park.

There is a sister statue in Paris and several others elsewhere in France, including one in Bartholdi's home town of Colmar, erected in 2004 to mark the centenary of Bartholdi's death; they also exist in Austria, Germany, Italy, Japan, China, Brazil and Vietnam; one existed in Hanoi during French colonial days. There are replicas in theme parks and resorts, including the New York-New York Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas on the Strip, replicas created as commercial advertising, and replicas erected in U.S. communities by patriotic benefactors, including no less than two hundred donated by Boy Scout troops to local communities. During the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989, Chinese student demonstrators in Beijing built a 10 m image called the Goddess of Democracy, which sculptor Tsao Tsing-yuan said was intentionally dissimilar to the Statue of Liberty to avoid being "too openly pro-American." At around the same time, a copy of this statue was made and displayed on Connecticut Avenue in Washington, DC, in a small park across the street from the Chinese Embassy
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« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2008, 08:50:04 pm »



Statue of Liberty in Odaiba, Japan
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« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2008, 08:52:12 pm »



Lady Liberty at Haldimand Bay, Mackinac Island, Michigan
Part of Strengthen the Arm of Liberty
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« Reply #40 on: December 09, 2008, 08:53:19 pm »



The small Statue of Liberty on the river Seine in Paris, France. The Statue of Liberty in New York is much larger. It faces west, towards its American sister.

Two replicas of the Statue of Liberty are found in Paris, France. One stands in the Jardin du Luxembourg: this is a bronze model that Bartholdi used in designing the New York statue; the artist offered it to the Luxembourg museum in 1900 and it was placed in the park in 1906[3]. The date written on this statue's tablet (where the New York statue has "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI") is "15 de novembre 1889" (November 15, 1889), the date at which the larger Parisian replica was inaugurated. This second Statue of Liberty in Paris is near the Grenelle Bridge on the Île des Cygnes, an island in the river Seine (48°51′0″N 2°16′47″E / 48.85, 2.27972, 11.50 m (37 feet 9 inches) high. Dedicated on November 15, 1889, it looks towards the Atlantic Ocean and hence towards its "larger sister" in New York Harbor, which had been erected three years earlier. Its tablet bears two dates: "IV JUILLET 1776" (July 4, 1776: the United States Declaration of Independence) like the New York statue, and "XIV JUILLET 1789" (July 14, 1789: the storming of the Bastille). This statue is shown in the movie National Treasure: Book of Secrets as one of the historic locations.

A life-size copy of the torch, Flame of Liberty, can be seen above the entrance to the Pont de l'Alma tunnel near the Champs Elysees in Paris. It was given to the city as a return gift in honor of the Centennial Celebration of the statue's dedication. Since it is above the Pont de l'Alma car tunnel in which Princess Diana died, the torch became an unofficial memorial to the Princess.

A third replica is the Bordeaux Statue of Liberty. This 2.5 m (8 ft) statue is in the city of Bordeaux in Southwest France. The first Bordeaux statue was seized and melted down by the Nazis in World War II. The statue was replaced in 2000 and a plaque was added to commemorate the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks. On the night of March 25, 2003, unknown vandals poured red paint and gasoline on the replica and set it on fire. The vandals also cracked the pedestal of the plaque. The mayor of Bordeaux, former prime minister Alain Juppé, condemned the attack.

There is a fourth replica in the northwest of France, in the small town of Barentin near Rouen. It was made for a French movie, Le Cerveau ("the brain"), directed by Gérard Oury and featuring actors Jean-Paul Belmondo and Bourvil.

A fifth replica is located in the center of the town Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer near Marseilles, France.

A 12 m (39 ft 4 in) replica of the Statue of Liberty in Colmar, the city of Bartholdi's birth, was dedicated on July 4, 2004 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his death. It stands at the north entrance of the city. The Bartholdi Museum in Colmar contains numerous models of various sizes made by Bartholdi during the process of designing the statue.
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« Reply #41 on: December 09, 2008, 08:55:27 pm »



It was a 100-degree Fourth Of July in 1999 and I was staggering around Manhattan for want of anything else to do. Before I passed out from heat stroke, I took an idle glance skywards at 64th and Broadway, and it was then that I saw her. Not Hillary, not Barbra, not Cher, but the Liberty Belle herself.




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« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2008, 08:56:42 pm »

No, the Statue Of Liberty hasn't been uprooted and moved to 64th Street.

According to the AIA Guide to New York City, this 37, or 55-foot tall (depending on who you believe) replica has been here since 1902. It was placed there to promote the Liberty Warehouse, which was the building's original use.
 


The residents of a high-rise apartment building across the street have a much better view of "Little" Liberty than is available from the street.

When first built, it must have dominated the neighborhood.

I always knew there was a large replica of the Statue Of Liberty somewhere in Manhattan, but I could never find it. Until now.

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« Reply #43 on: December 09, 2008, 08:57:46 pm »

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« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2008, 08:58:07 pm »

Little Miss Liberty was cast in Akron, Ohio, in about 1900. She was shipped into NYC on a flatbed car after being sliced in half lengthwise, and then soldered together again. When first erected, the statue had a spiral staircase that allowed visitors to climb up to the top to get a panoramic view, just like in the real McCoy in the harbor. That staircase was closed in 1912 and has fallen into ruin. Perhaps it can be rebuilt when Little Liberty is moved. At the time, there were no taller buildings in the vicinity, so the view from here was panoramic.

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