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the Statue of Liberty

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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #45 on: December 09, 2008, 08:59:14 pm »



After a near-100 year run on the Liberty Warehouse, it looks like Little Miss Liberty's days in this location are numbered. The Athena Group, which owns the Liberty Warehouse, is going to add four floors to the 8-story building and sell them as luxury apartments. That means Little Miss Liberty has to go. But where?

2004: Little Liberty is currently in storage at the sculpture garden of the Brooklyn Museum.



Little Liberty, as viewed from the 8th floor at ABC network headquarters on Columbus Avenue.

The statue replicated most of the details of its larger mentor, matching the robe folds and pedestal!
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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #46 on: December 09, 2008, 08:59:52 pm »

New Yorkers got a sneak preview of "Liberty Enlightening the World" in 1885, when the arm and torch were placed in Madison Square Park at Fifth Avenue and 24th Street.

The General William Worth monument at left is still standing; it has been there since 1857. The general himself can be located beneath the monument.

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« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2008, 09:00:17 pm »



While the Manhattan Little Liberty isn't there anymore, this one, at River Avenue near Yankee Stadium, has kept her position.
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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2008, 09:00:30 pm »

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« Reply #49 on: December 09, 2008, 09:01:05 pm »



Yet one more Liberty, on Williamsbridge Road.

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« Reply #50 on: December 09, 2008, 09:01:34 pm »



Closeup view of River Avenue Liberty.
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« Reply #51 on: December 09, 2008, 09:01:58 pm »



Bronx Liberty photos: Donald Gilligan
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« Reply #52 on: December 09, 2008, 09:02:26 pm »



Liberty's crown was replicated at El Teddy's night spot at Varick and Franklin Streets. The real crown has seven spikes.
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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #53 on: December 09, 2008, 09:03:30 pm »



The real McCoy, of course, continues to greet the tempest tost, the homeless, and those yearning to breathe free in the harbor. Until Charlton Heston finds it washed up along the Brooklyn coastline in Planet Of The Apes.
SOURCES:

David Dunlap, "Kicking Out The Kid Sister," NY Times, January 16, 2002

Thanks to Charles Gallo for assistance with this page

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Got a beef? E me at erpietri@earthlink.net.
http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/STATUE/liberty.html
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« Reply #54 on: December 09, 2008, 09:09:08 pm »

Liberty Warehouse Statue of Liberty
64th and Broadway
New York City


40 foot tall Statue of Liberty (on pedestal) faithfully modeled after the original in New York harbor with practical exceptions such as a torch that looks more like a coffee can.

In "New York: A Serendipiter's Journey" (Harper & Brothers, 1961), Gay Talese recounted that the statue was installed in 1902 by William H. Flattau, a French immigrant and patriotic warehouse owner, who died in 1931 along with much of the statue's history.

The statue rests on top of the 8-story Liberty Storage Warehouse Building, 43 West 64th, (location of O'Neals' restaurant) near the corner of 64th Street and Broadway, overlooking Lincoln Center.

The Statue is made of molded sheet metal bolted to a frame. It has a circular stairway inside and a view down Broadway through the crown, but access for the public was closed in 1912. This Liberty was cast in Akron, Ohio in the early 1900s and sent to New York on a flatbed train car. At the time, it was one of the highest points on the city's West Side.

Widely reputed to be 55 feet tall, the actual height is more like 40 feet, about the same height as Bartholdi's 36 foot working model, now mounted near the foot of the Grenelle Bridge on the Seine River in Paris.

On 19 December 2001, Athena Group, a New York property developer, announced plans to renovate the building into a 12- story apartment house. The statue will be preserved "under all circumstances". Relocation sites are being considered.


Sunday, 17 February 2002
37 Foot Tall Statue of Liberty Removed from Liberty Warehouse for Relocation to Brooklyn Museum.
The Athena Group, owner of the Statue and Liberty Warehouse where it stood, donated the artwork to Brooklyn Museum of Art in honor of the police officers, firefighters and other emergency workers killed Sept. 11. It will be featured in the museum's sculpture garden.

Brooklyn Museum of Art: http://www.brooklynart.org/


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Janelle Spyker
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« Reply #55 on: December 09, 2008, 09:09:35 pm »

August 9, 2005
Arts, Briefly

Compiled by LAWRENCE VAN GELDER


Liberty Moves to Brooklyn

The Statue of Liberty that stood for years atop a Manhattan warehouse will rise again in October on the grounds of the Frieda Schiff Warburg Memorial Sculpture Garden at the Brooklyn Museum. The 47-foot-tall statue and pedestal, much shorter than the Bartholdi original (151 feet, 1 inch from base to torch), was created in the late 19th century by immigrant artisans as a gesture of patriotism and was installed in 1902 on the Liberty Storage Warehouse at 43 West 64th Street, at Broadway. Given to the museum in 2002, when the building was turned into cooperative apartments, it will join a collection of architectural fragments salvaged from other New York City structures like Pennsylvania Station and Steeplechase Park in Coney Island. Since arriving at the museum in 2002, the statue has been lying on its back in a secured area of the parking lot, pending conservation including cleaning, stabilization, a surface finish and a new base.


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« Reply #56 on: December 09, 2008, 09:10:33 pm »

August 13, 2005
Brooklyn Museum to Install Monumental Statue of Liberty Replica
HelloBrooklyn.Com


 A monumental replica of the Statue of Liberty will be raised on the grounds in the rear of the Brooklyn Museum in October 2005. Created in the late nineteenth century by immigrant artisans as a gesture of patriotism, it was originally installed atop a Manhattan building where it stood for one hundred years. The statue was a gift to the Brooklyn Museum in 2002 by The Athena Group, Athena Liberty-Lofts L.P., and Brickman Associates, who removed it from the building when it was being turned into cooperative apartments.

In its new ground-level home at the Brooklyn Museum, the statue will be viewable up close and on all sides. About one-fifth the height of the Bartholdi original, the sculpture will undergo conservation efforts in view of visitors beginning in the spring of 2006 while positioned in its new location. The 47-foot-high Statue of Liberty and pedestal was originally installed in 1902 on auctioneer William H. Flattau’s Liberty Storage Warehouse at 43 West 64th Street, where it was once one of the highest points on the Upper West Side. Until 1912 visitors were able to ascend an interior spiral staircase to view Broadway and Columbus Circle through Lady Liberty’s crown. Made of galvanized steel over an iron framework and fully modeled in three dimensions, it is thought to have been created in a foundry in either Pennsylvania or Ohio.

The statue is the latest and largest addition to the Brooklyn Museum’s Frieda Schiff Warburg Memorial Sculpture Garden –– a collection of architectural fragments salvaged from New York City buildings that were being demolished, including Pennsylvania Station and Coney Island’s Steeplechase Park.

Since its arrival at the Museum in 2002, the statue has been lying on its back in a secured area of the parking lot, where, along with other objects in the collection, it has undergone review and evaluation by Museum conservators in preparation for its reinstallation. The conservation treatment will include cleaning of the surface, stabilization of the structure, and an appropriate surface finish, along with a new base.

The Brooklyn Museum has been awarded a Cultural Grant from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs to support the reinstallation and enhancement of the Frieda Schiff Memorial Sculpture Garden.

The donation of the statue to the Brooklyn Museum by The Athena Group, Athena Liberty-Lofts L.P., and Brickman Associates honors the Fire Department of New York, the New York Police Department, the Emergency Medical Services, and the New York State Court Officers and their heroism on September 11, 2001.

Visit the Brooklyn Museum Web site at http://www.brooklynmuseum.org


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« Reply #57 on: December 09, 2008, 09:14:28 pm »



Model in Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris, the bronze model that Bartholdi used in designing the New York statue.

Two replicas of the Statue of Liberty are found in Paris, France. One stands in the Jardin du Luxembourg: this is a bronze model that Bartholdi used in designing the New York statue; the artist offered it to the Luxembourg museum in 1900 and it was placed in the park in 1906[3]. The date written on this statue's tablet (where the New York statue has "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI") is "15 de novembre 1889" (November 15, 1889), the date at which the larger Parisian replica was inaugurated. This second Statue of Liberty in Paris is near the Grenelle Bridge on the Île des Cygnes, an island in the river Seine (48°51′0″N 2°16′47″E / 48.85, 2.27972, 11.50 m (37 feet 9 inches) high. Dedicated on November 15, 1889, it looks towards the Atlantic Ocean and hence towards its "larger sister" in New York Harbor, which had been erected three years earlier. Its tablet bears two dates: "IV JUILLET 1776" (July 4, 1776: the United States Declaration of Independence) like the New York statue, and "XIV JUILLET 1789" (July 14, 1789: the storming of the Bastille). This statue is shown in the movie National Treasure: Book of Secrets as one of the historic locations.

A life-size copy of the torch, Flame of Liberty, can be seen above the entrance to the Pont de l'Alma tunnel near the Champs Elysees in Paris. It was given to the city as a return gift in honor of the Centennial Celebration of the statue's dedication. Since it is above the Pont de l'Alma car tunnel in which Princess Diana died, the torch became an unofficial memorial to the Princess.[citation needed]

A third replica is the Bordeaux Statue of Liberty. This 2.5 m (8 ft) statue is in the city of Bordeaux in Southwest France. The first Bordeaux statue was seized and melted down by the Nazis in World War II. The statue was replaced in 2000 and a plaque was added to commemorate the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks. On the night of March 25, 2003, unknown vandals poured red paint and gasoline on the replica and set it on fire. The vandals also cracked the pedestal of the plaque. The mayor of Bordeaux, former prime minister Alain Juppé, condemned the attack.

There is a fourth replica in the northwest of France, in the small town of Barentin near Rouen. It was made for a French movie, Le Cerveau ("the brain"), directed by Gérard Oury and featuring actors Jean-Paul Belmondo and Bourvil.[4]

A fifth replica is located in the center of the town Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer near Marseilles, France.[5][6]

A 12 m (39 ft 4 in) replica of the Statue of Liberty in Colmar, the city of Bartholdi's birth, was dedicated on July 4, 2004 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his death. It stands at the north entrance of the city.[7][8] The Bartholdi Museum in Colmar contains numerous models of various sizes made by Bartholdi during the process of designing the statue.[9]
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« Reply #58 on: December 09, 2008, 09:22:36 pm »

A bronze sculpture of the Statue of Liberty is on display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Duluth, Minnesota, has a small copy on the west side of the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, in the center of a clearing surrounded by pine trees where it may be passed unnoticed. It was presented to the city by some of Bartholdi's descendants residing in Duluth.

The Boy Scouts of America celebrated their fortieth anniversary in 1950 with the theme of "Strengthen the Arm of Liberty". Between 1949 and 1952, approximately two hundred 100-inch (2.5 m) replicas of the statue, made of stamped copper, were purchased by Boy Scout troops and donated in 39 states in the U.S. and several of its possessions and territories. The project was the brainchild of Kansas City businessman, J.P. Whitaker, who was then Scout Commissioner of the Kansas City Area Council. The copper statues were manufactured by Friedley-Voshardt Co. (Chicago, IL) and purchased through the Kansas City Boy Scout office by those wanting one. The statues are approximately 8 1/2 feet tall without the base, constructed of sheet copper, weigh 290 pounds, and originally cost $350 plus freight. The mass-produced statues are not great art nor meticulously accurate (a conservator notes that "her face isn't as mature as the real Liberty. It's rounder and more like a little girl's"), but they are cherished, particularly since 9/11. Many have been lost or destroyed, but preservationists have been able to account for about a hundred of them, and BSA Troop 101 of Cheyenne, Wyoming has collected photographs of over 100 of them.

There is a half-size replica at the New York-New York Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Another smaller replica stands in Las Vegas, on West Sahara Avenue. The pedestal once housed a local business, Statue of Liberty Pizza. Today it advertises Liberty Tax Service, a tax preparation firm.

The city of Sioux Falls, South Dakota erected a replacement bronze reproduction standing 9 ft (2.7 m) tall in McKennan Park atop the original pedestal for a long-missing wooden replica.
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« Reply #59 on: December 09, 2008, 09:22:59 pm »

A 36-foot (11 m) tall bronze replica, accurately based on Bartholdi's "Liberty Enlightening the World", stands in Vestavia Hills, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama. It was cast in 1956 at the Société Antoine Durenne foundry in Somerville Haut Marne, France for placement in 1958 atop the Liberty National Life Insurance Company Building in downtown Birmingham.[10] It was relocated and placed on a 60-foot (18 m) tall granite pedestal adjacent to Interstate 459 in 1989.[26][27][28]

Two 30-foot (9.1 m) copper replicas stand atop the Liberty National Bank Building[10] in Buffalo, New York, nearly 108 m (354 ft) above street level.[29][30]

A 25 ft (7.6 m) tall replica sits on the ruins of the late Marysville Bridge (erected on a platform (pier)) in the Dauphin Narrows of Susquehanna River north of Harrisburg. The replica was built by a local activist Gene Stilp on July 2, 1986; it was made of venetian blinds and stood 18 feet (5.5 m) tall. Six years later, after it was destroyed in a windstorm, it was rebuilt by Stilp and other local citizens, of wood, metal, glass and fiberglass, to a height of 25 feet (7.6 m).[31][32][33]

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