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4,300-Year-Old Pyramid Discovered In Egypt - PICTURES

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Bianca
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« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2008, 01:50:56 pm »









                            Pyramid Discovery May Offer Details on Pharaoh's Balding Mother






By Mahmoud Kassem
Nov. 11, 2008
(Bloomberg.com) --

Archaeologists digging near the world's oldest step-pyramid of Saqqara, the main burial site of ancient royal Egyptians before the pyramids of Giza, said today that they have discovered what may be the tomb of the mother of a sixth dynasty Pharaoh called Teti.

The pyramid was discovered about two months ago on a site that has been under excavation for 20 years, said Zahi Hawass, secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. Little remains except the base of the structure, which is believed to be about 4,300 years old and probably belonged to Queen Sesheshet, he told reporters at the site today.

``It's common for us to find a tomb or a statue, but to find a pyramid, that is rare,'' Hawass told reporters. ``There are probably many more discoveries to be made around this site.''

Hawass said that the ancient pyramid, the 118th to be found in Egypt, may be that of Teti's mother because two of the Pharaoh's wives are buried nearby in the necropolis. The archaeologists working
on the site will only know for sure that it is Sesheshet once they enter the burial chamber and find inscriptions, Hawass said. It's unlikely that they will find any treasure inside as there are signs that thieves from ancient times hacked into the structure by digging a shaft, he said.

References to Queen Sesheshet have been found in ancient papyrus texts. In one of them, the queen made a request to doctors to find her a cure for hair loss, Hawass said. It's not clear if she was ever given one.

Around the pyramid, archaeologists found funerary figurines dating back to the third intermediary period (818-712 B.C.) as well as a New Kingdom chapel decorated with a scene of the dead making an offering to the god Osiris, the Supreme Council of Antiquities said in a statement.

Teti was the first pharaoh of the sixth dynasty and is also buried at Saqqara. The main step-pyramid
at Saqqara of King Djoser is almost fully intact and is often visited by tourists along with the pyramids
of Giza.




To contact the reporter on the story:

Mahmoud Kassem in Cairo at
mkassem1@bloomberg.net

Last Updated: November 11, 2008
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Josie Linde
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« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2008, 09:09:54 pm »

This is an awesome discovery, Bianca, and great job presenting it! I am betting that there are a lot more undiscovered structures close to the Nile, buried under an alluvial layer. I'm not certain how they arrived at the date for this one, or why they kept it secret for two years, I think that a lot of Egyptologists are more conscious about not having the answers to something as opposed to having the right answers.
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« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2008, 09:11:48 pm »

Egypt says has found pyramid built for ancient queen
Tue 11 Nov 2008, 13:18 GMT
 
[-] Text
  • By Will Rasmussen

SAQQARA, Egypt, Nov 11 (Reuters Life!) - Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a pyramid buried in the desert and thought to belong to the mother of a pharaoh who ruled more than 4,000 years ago, Egypt's antiquities chief said on Tuesday.

The pyramid, found about two months ago in the sand south of Cairo, probably housed the remains of Queen Sesheshet, the mother of King Teti, who ruled from 2323 to 2291 BC and founded Egypt's Sixth Dynasty, Zahi Hawass told reporters.

"The only queen whose pyramid is missing is Shesheshet, which is why I am sure it belonged to her," Hawass said. "This will enrich our knowledge about the Old Kingdom."

The Sixth Dynasty, a time of conflict in Egypt's royal family and erosion of centralised power, is considered to be the last dynasty of the Old Kingdom, after which Egypt descended into famine and social upheaval.

Archaeologists had previously discovered pyramids belonging to two of the king's wives nearby, but had never found a tomb belonging to Sesheshet.

The headless, five-metre (16-foot) high pyramid originally reached about 14 metres, with sides 22 metres long, Hawass said.

The pyramid, which Hawass said was the 118th found in Egypt, was uncovered near the world's oldest pyramid at Saqqara, a burial ground for the rulers of ancient Egypt.

"This may be the most complete subsidiary pyramid ever found at Saqqara," Hawass said.

The monument was originally covered in a casing of white limestone brought from quarries at nearby Tura, Hawass said.

Archaeologists plan to enter the pyramid's burial chamber within two weeks, although most of its contents are likely to have been taken by thieves, Hawass said.

Artefacts including a wooden statue of the ancient Egyptian god Anubis and funerary figurines dating from a later period indicate that the cemetery had been reused through Roman times, Hawass said. (Writing by Will Rasmussen; editing by Ralph Boulton)

© Reuters 2008. All Rights Reserved.  |  Learn more about Reuters

http://africa.reuters.com/wire/news/usnLB334895.html
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Bianca
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« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2008, 10:50:21 pm »



QUOTE:


"This is an awesome discovery, Bianca, and great job presenting it! I am betting that there are a lot more undiscovered structures close to the Nile, buried under an alluvial layer. I'm not certain how they arrived at the date for this one, or why they kept it secret for two years, I think that a lot of Egyptologists are more conscious about not having the answers to something as opposed to having the right answers."



Thank you, Josie.

I agree, it is an awesome discovery.  A lot has been discovered at Saqqara in the last few years.

It seems to me that, after the full discovery of KV5 in the Valley of the Kings (Ramses II's immense
tomb for his numerous sons), the focus has definitely shifted to Saqqara.  And, you're right, I also
believe they have only begun to 'scratch the surface' and way more will come to light as time goes
by. 



For all his faults, Zahi Hawass is a 'mover and a shaker'.....

He seems to have completely cut loose from the Egyptian Government and seems to operate very
independently from it (who can blame him, if he can get away with it!) even to the point of generating
a source of income - Tut's exhibits, at home and abroad - so that a NEW, more adequate museum is
being built.  Not to mention his success in obtaining archaeological 'expeditions' ($$$) which mostly
benefit Egypt.

He can get on our nerves for many reasons, but his management of his country's archeological interests
has been superb and has gotten results.  The man is totally obsessed by his profession, and he does
do it well.

No mean feat in the kind of country that Egypt is, politically, and the rest of the world that, in the
past, has robbed its people blind of their own heritage.....


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I have been meaning to do an in-depth thread on Saqqara, but it is going to be a monumental job,
if it is to be done properly.

I am going to have to work up a little more enthusiasm for it, LOL, LOL, LOL.......

In the meantime, there's a little bit in the following posts.

Thank you for YOUR own input, I always appreciate it!


Hugs,
b
« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 11:31:41 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2008, 10:51:10 pm »



SAQQARA MAP
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Bianca
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« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2008, 10:53:15 pm »








                                                                S A Q Q A R A






Location
29.87 N - 31.21 E


Lower Egypt -
overlooking the Egyptian capital of Memphis


West bank of Nile,
5 km north of Abusir


Nome 
White fortress - the 1st nome of Lower Egypt


Type of Settlement
Necropolis






                                                            Historical Development





The earliest burials of nobles at Saqqara can be traced back to the Early Dynastic Period

The area became the first Royal necropolis of the Old Kingdom

In the New Kingdom it was eclipsed as the burial ground of royalty by the Valley of the Kings,

In the Late Kingdom and Ptolemaic Period, it regained importance as a complex for cult Apis Bull burials in the Serapeum



Because the necropolis was lost beneath the sands for the past 2000 years, many mastabas and temple

complexes have been superbly preserved, with both their structures and internal decorations intact.
 




                                                                   Monuments





a) The site is dominated by the famous step Pyramid of Zoser - designed by Imhotep, and is the
world's oldest standing stone monument

d) The ruined Pyramid of the 5th Dynasty Pharaoh Userkaf.

c) The 6th Dynasty pyramid of Teti I, now completely ruined. Adjacent to the pyramid are the mastabas of his officials. The mastaba of Kagemni, a Vizier and judge under three Pharaohs of the 5th and 6th Dynasties, has marvelous relieves showing fishermen

d) The Serapeum - twenty chambers contain sarcophagi the 'Apis Bulls' from the New Kingdom down to the Ptolemaic Period

e) The Tomb of Shepseskaf - Unlike his immediate predecessors and his successors, he chose the form of a mastaba rather then a pyramid for his tomb

f) The Pyramid complex of Pepi I from the 6th dynasty, with its associated queens pyramids

g) The Pyramid of Pepi II, the last great pyramid built in the Old Kingdom.

h) Merenre's complex

I) Unas complex, the oldest tomb which has Pyramid Texts inscribed. His pyramid is surprisingly small considering his long reign, rising only 52 meters above ground. Its present condition is also a disappointment, it is more like a heap of rubble, and it is only on the northern side that a few stones still stand

J) The Pyramid complex of Djedkare from the 5th dynasty, known as Haram el-Shawaf.

K) The tomb of Horemheb - Built before he became Pharaoh, in a modest scale, with wall decorations showing his daily life. The tomb was never used, hence his last resting place became the Valley of the Kings.

l) The Pyramid of Ibi from the 8th dynasty - the only pyramid constructed during the first intermediate period. His pyramid was small compared to all other completed ones, just 21 meters high. Today it is in a very ruinous state, consisting of 3 piles of limestone chips lying around the burial chamber. 



http://www.aldokkan.com/geography/saqqara.htm
« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 11:00:19 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2008, 08:41:25 am »










                                   Pyramid find to shed light on last pharoah dynasty






11/11/08 16:44 CET
world news

VIDEO

http://www.archaeologynews.org/link.asp?ID=348844&Title=Pyramid%20find%20to%20shed%20light%20on%20last%20pharoah%20dynasty


The archaeological world is hailing the discovery of a pyramid in the desert, south of Cairo. It is thought to belong to Queen Sesheshet, the mother of a pharaoh who ruled more than 4,000 years ago. All other tombs of Egyptian queens have been found.

Top Egyptian archeologist Zahi Hawass said: “This pyramid is the most complete subsidiary pyramid ever found at Saqqara because a big part of the casing – about two metres wide – was found, showing that this pyramid was beautifully cased. And the other important thing is that this is the first pyramid to be discovered with a superstructure five metres high.”

The pyramid – the 118th found in Egypt – was uncovered at Saqqara, a burial ground for the rulers of ancient Egypt.

Archaeologists plan to enter one of the monument’s chambers within two weeks. They expect most of its contents to have been taken by thieves, but hope that it will still reveal much about ancient Egypt’s last great dynasty.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2008, 08:42:37 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Horus
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« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2009, 06:07:07 pm »

Great thread about a very important pyramid field that is often overlooked (like Meidum too) because of Giza.

Thanks a lot for posting the satellite pic of Saqqara, Bianca! I've never seen that before (nor even thought to find one) and I noticed something which may be very important about it -the multiple shafts! I'm emailing my archeoastronomer friend in Egypt right now!
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Bianca
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« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2009, 08:05:03 pm »





I am glad you can use the satellite pic, Horus.  It's nice to feel that all this
research is good for something....LOL.

BTW, if I remember correctly, you mentioned the "Lost Labyrinth" somewhere. 
Have you seen this:

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,12883.0.html



'Payback time', now. LOL....

One of my 'pet' sections is ANCIENT ASTRONOMY & ARCHEOASTRONOMY, here:

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/board,239.0.html

Can I look forward to your adding to it?

Blessings,
b
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 08:15:47 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Horus
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« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2009, 08:45:05 pm »


BTW, if I remember correctly, you mentioned the "Lost Labyrinth" somewhere. 
Have you seen this:

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,12883.0.html

Yes that's the work of my friend Bill Brown, an archaeoastronomer and site engineer.  He is the director of the Hawara excavation with the Poles.  He was their team at Giza doing ground penetrating radar in 2006 too and... he married one of them!


Quote
'Payback time', now. LOL....

One of my 'pet' sections is ANCIENT ASTRONOMY & ARCHEOASTRONOMY, here:

http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/board,239.0.html

Can I look forward to your adding to it?


Good Lord! There's an entire section for that too!? lol
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