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Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings

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Cassandra
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« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2007, 01:27:15 am »

 
« Last Edit: July 18, 2007, 01:29:06 am by Cassandra » Report Spam   Logged
Cassandra
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« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2007, 01:28:17 am »

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Cassandra
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« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2007, 01:30:40 am »

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« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2007, 01:08:00 am »

ARCHAEOLOGISTS SPECULATE THAT RING FOUND IN BULGARIA BELONGED TO THRACIAN KING TERES II
09:01 Wed 18 Jul 2007

 
The solid gold ring found in a Thracian mound near Sliven on July 15 2007 by archaeologists most probably belonged to Thracian King Teres II, expedition member Yordanka Radancheva said.

King Teres II ruled from 350-341 BCE.

The ring, which has a Greek inscription and the likeness of a man, probably doubled as a seal, Bulgarian news agency BTA said.

The inscription was initially deciphered to read “The Saviour of Asia”.

Two silver centaurs and a sword that belonged to the interred person were also found at the site. Most of the artifacts found at the site are ornate, which suggests that the people buried there were aristocrats.

Archaeologists see the results of recent excavations as evidence that the Valley of Thracian Kings extends eastward from the Kazanluk area into the Sliven area.

The burial has been initially dated to the fourth century BCE, though some of the artifacts may have been made at an earlier date.

 http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/archaeologists-speculate-that-ring-found-in-bulgaria-belonged-to-thracian-king-teres-ii/id_23865/catid_70
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Cassandra
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« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2007, 01:21:58 am »

ANOTHER UNIQUE ARCHAEOLOGICAL DISCOVERY IN BULGARIA
12:02 Tue 24 Jul 2007

 
Archaeologists found a Thracian vessel in the shape of a horse head in a funeral mound near the town of Sliven.

The workmanship was especially precise, Focus news agency reported.

The horse’s accoutrements and a labris (double axe) were represented on the vessel. Focus said that the labris was a symbol of royal power in Thrace.

Georgi Kitov, head of the archaeological expedition, said that the vessel was unique from a scientific point of view. The labris proved the vessel was owned by a Thracian king.

Only half a body was found in the tomb, showing that the deceased was a follower of Orpheus, Kitov said.

Amphoras, clay vessels of various sizes and bronze pitchers were also found in the two tombs under the hill.

http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/archaeologists-speculate-that-ring-found-in-bulgaria-belonged-to-thracian-king-teres-ii/id_23865/catid_70
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Cassandra
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« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2007, 01:24:35 am »

ARCHAEOLOGISTS SPECULATE THAT RING FOUND IN BULGARIA BELONGED TO THRACIAN KING TERES II
09:01 Wed 18 Jul 2007

 
The solid gold ring found in a Thracian mound near Sliven on July 15 2007 by archaeologists most probably belonged to Thracian King Teres II, expedition member Yordanka Radancheva said.

King Teres II ruled from 350-341 BCE.

The ring, which has a Greek inscription and the likeness of a man, probably doubled as a seal, Bulgarian news agency BTA said.

The inscription was initially deciphered to read “The Saviour of Asia”.

Two silver centaurs and a sword that belonged to the interred person were also found at the site. Most of the artifacts found at the site are ornate, which suggests that the people buried there were aristocrats.

Archaeologists see the results of recent excavations as evidence that the Valley of Thracian Kings extends eastward from the Kazanluk area into the Sliven area.

The burial has been initially dated to the fourth century BCE, though some of the artifacts may have been made at an earlier date.

 
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Cassandra
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« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2007, 03:19:59 am »

14 ROMAN-ERA GOLD COINS FOUND NEAR BULGARIA’S PESHTERA
14:08 Mon 23 Jul 2007

 
Archaeologists examining a Roman fortress near the Bulgarian town of Peshtera have found 14 gold coins dating back to the sixth century.

The coins were found at the bottom of a granary near a basilica, Focus news agency reported.

Local history museum director Dimitar Pavlov said that the coins might have been hidden when the Slavs attacked and captured the fortress.

The dig in Peshtera has so far uncovered numerous bronze and silver coins, silver pendants and various ceramic objects, Focus said.

The artifacts are to be kept either in the local museum or at the National Museum of History

http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/14-roman-era-gold-coins-found-near-bulgarias-peshtera/id_23962/catid_70
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Cassandra
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« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2007, 12:45:36 am »

Shop assistant wore ancient necklace

Archaeologists have found a valuable ancient gold necklace being worn by a cashier in a Bulgarian grocery after it was dug up by her husband.

Boris Todorov, 43, from Karlovo in Bulgaria dug up hundreds of fine gold rings from a field on his farm and put them together to make a gift for his wife.

But it was spotted by a group of archaeologists from the Bulgarian National Museum of History who were passing through - and went into her shop to buy provisions.

They immediately identified the necklace as extremely valuable and now say it dates back to 3,000 years BC.

Prof Bozhidar Dimitrov, Director of the Bulgarian National Museum of History, said: "They almost passed out when they saw what the woman was wearing. It is a stunning discovery."

Experts believe a local civilisation buried jewels in fields as part of an elaborate prayer ritual.

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2444085.html

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Cassandra
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« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2007, 11:58:36 pm »

Bulgarian Archaeologists Unearth 2,500-Years-Old Tomb


7 August 2007, Tuesday

Archaeologists from the Bulgaria's National History Museum have unearthed a tomb of a citizen, who lived in the ancient city of Apollonia, which is today's Black Sea town of Sozopol.

The team of Krastina Panayotova is working on the Harmani beach of Sozopol, a site which archaeologist have been exploring for many years now. During regular excavations Panayotova's team stumbled upon the tomb.

When the scientist opened it they found many pottery, the skeleton of a man, who lived some 2,500 years ago and a huge ceramic bowl with an inscription in ancient Greek.

The bowl has been already taken for a thorough expertise and a team of linguists was called to decipher the inscription. When this is done, the Head of the Museum Bozhidar Dimitrov hopes the scientists will get a further understanding of Apollonia Pontica - the first democratic state in the lands of today's Bulgaria.

The interesting thing for this artefact is that it was unearthed in the family part of the necropolis, where Histiyani, the tyrant of Milet, was buried.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=83923
« Last Edit: August 18, 2007, 03:06:19 am by Cassandra » Report Spam   Logged
Cassandra
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« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2007, 03:04:30 am »

Yet Another Ancient Tomb Unearthed in Bulgaria's Sozopol


14 August 2007, Tuesday

A team of Bulgarian archaeologists unearthed Tuesday an ancient stone tomb, dated back to the 4th century BC, Darik News reported.

The team, lead by Krastina Panayotova, stumbled upon the tomb during the annual archaeological excavations on the Harmani beach of the Black Sea town of Sozopol.

A man, probably an athlete, had been buried in the tomb because the team found an object used by athletes in antiquity.

Just a day earlier the archaeologists came upon the grave of another man, probably a gambler. The grave was full of dice, backgammon pieces and coins.

Last week the same team unearthed a tomb of a citizen, who lived in the ancient city of Apollonia, which is today's Sozopol.

The team of Krastina Panayotova is working on the Harmani beach of Sozopol, a site which archaeologist have been exploring for many years now.

Sozopol is one of the oldest towns on Bulgarian Thrace's Black Sea coast. The first settlement on the site dates back to the Bronze Age. Undersea explorations in the region of the port reveal relics of dwellings, ceramic pottery, stone and bone tools from that era. Many anchors from the second and first millennium BC have been discovered in the town's bay, a proof of active shipping since ancient times.

The town, at first called Antheia, was colonized by Anaximander. The name was soon changed to Apollonia, on account of a temple dedicated to Apollo in the town, containing a famous colossal statue of the god by Calamis, 30 cubits high, transported later to Rome by Lucullus and placed in the Capitol. At various times, Apollonia was known as Apollonia Pontica (that is, Apollonia on the Black Sea, the ancient Pontus Euxinus) and Apollonia Magna.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=84199
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Cassandra
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« Reply #25 on: August 18, 2007, 03:08:10 am »

Bulgaria Discovers Biggest Ancient Water Tank on the Balkans

17 August 2007, Friday


The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza. Photo by www.bulgariancastles.com
Bulgarian archaeologists announced they have discovered the biggest ancient tank for storing water on the Balkans, etched into the rock sanctuary of Perperikon, near Kardzhali in southern Bulgaria.

Top archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov, who unearthed the water tank to add it to the long list of exciting finds from the rock sanctuary, says the discovery proves that there were times when Perperikon was densely populated and with huge water supplies.

The tank, measuring twelve-meter-long, six-meter-wide and six-meter-deep, has a capacity of 432 000 litres.

It was just last month that Ovcharov showed the press two unique ceramic figurines of a cobra, dragon heads and a throne with an upright phallus that were discovered at the rock sanctuary of Perperikon.

The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=84290
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Cassandra
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« Reply #26 on: August 18, 2007, 03:09:27 am »

Bulgaria Discovers Biggest Ancient Water Tank on the Balkans



The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza. Photo by www.bulgariancastles.com
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rockessence
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« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2007, 11:42:01 am »

Still no sightings of the phallus throne!
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ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
Cassandra
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« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2007, 07:24:58 am »

I'll say, it better be worth the wait! Why do you suppose they are keeping it from us?
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rockessence
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« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2007, 11:15:10 am »

Maybe because everyone will want one?
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ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
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