Atlantis Online
October 26, 2020, 08:11:11 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Plato's Atlantis: Fact, Fiction or Prophecy?
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=CarolAnn_Bailey-Lloyd
http://www.underwaterarchaeology.com/atlantis-2.htm
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

HAUNTED ILLINOIS COLLEGE


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: HAUNTED ILLINOIS COLLEGE  (Read 121 times)
Keira Kensington
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4702



« on: October 13, 2008, 12:23:25 am »



Sturtevant Hall at Illinois College


Nine students met for the first class on January 4, 1830. Julian Sturtevant, the first instructor and the second president, reported, "We had come there that morning to open a fountain for future generations to drink at." Shortly after, Edward Beecher left the Park Street Church in Boston, Massachusetts, to serve the new college as it first president. He created a strong college and retained close intellectual ties with New England. His brother, Henry Ward Beecher, preached and lectured at Illinois College, and his sister, Harriet Beecher Stowe, was an occasional visitor. His brother, Thomas, was graduated from Illinois College in 1843. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mark Twain, Horace Greeley, and Wendell Phillips were among the visitors and lecturers in the early years.

In 1843 and 1845 two of the College's seven literary societies were formed. Possibly unique in the Midwest today, the societies have continued in their roles as centers for debate and criticism. Abraham Lincoln was one of many speakers appearing on the campus under the sponsorship of a literary society.

Illinois College also became heavily involved with the abolitionist movement as President Beecher took a very active role. At one point, a group of students was indicted by a grand jury for harboring runaway slaves. Illinois College was also a well-known station on the Underground Railroad and a number of tunnels can still be found under the college, leading to the Smith and Fayerweather houses on the campus.

In the years following the Civil War graduates contributed with distinction to the national scene. Among these was William Jennings Bryan, '81, who within 15 years was the Democratic candidate for the U.S. presidency in the race with McKinley. He continued with a prominent role in politics even after the election.

There were many other famous and prominent graduates of the school over the years and it has maintained an outstanding scholarly program.

Not surprisingly, it has maintained close ties to the supernatural world as well. Like with many other historic spots in Illinois, the events of the past have certainly left their mark on Illinois College. Many of these events still come back to “haunt” students and faculty members today and there are many who have encountered this ghosts of yesterday face-to face.

Report Spam   Logged


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy