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Lost LABYRINTH Of Egypt Scanned

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« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2008, 10:07:56 am »










Renaissance



The Renaissance stimulated rising interest in Antiquity, and brought back into circulation classical authors such as Herodotus.

As a result, once again people became interested in the Egyptian Labyrinth.

The scholar Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680 CE) produced one of the first pictorial reconstructions, mainly based on the account in Herodotus.

At the centre of his architecture drawing, Kircher placed a maze, most likely to have been inspired
by Roman labyrinth mosaics, and surrounded it with the twelve courts described by Herodotus
(Kern 1995 : fig. 63).
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« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2008, 10:11:15 am »










Early Explorers



A structure which evoked so much wonder and admiration in ancient times hardly failed arouse the curiosity of later generations, but no serious attempts to locate it seem to have been made by Europeans until several centuries later. It was then far too late to observe any of its glories, for it disappeared in Roman times, and a village sprang up on its site, largely constructed from surrounding debris.

 




Paul Lucas (1664 -1737 CE)

The artist, Paul Lucas (1664 Rouen - 1737 Madrid), and Antiquary to Louis XIV of France, is one of
the earliest sources of information from Upper Egypt, visiting Thebes and the Nile up to the cataracts.

In the book in which he subsequently published the account of his travels, he gives us some idea of
the state of the remains in his time, but his account is very rambling and unreliable.

His drawing is a partial view of the ruins of the alleged labyrinth. Remark the ruins on top of an intact and proportional colossal temple.

Lucas states that an old Arab who accompanied his party professed to have explored the interior of
the ruins many years before, and to have penetrated into its subterranean passages to a large chamber surrounded by several niches, "like little shops," whence endless alleys and other rooms branched off.

A statement that supports the probability that the labyrinth survived the Ptolemaic in Roman times unaffected. By the time of Lucas's visit, however, these passages could not be traced, and he concluded that they had become blocked up by debris.
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« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2008, 10:15:08 am »










Richard Pococke (1704 – 1765 CE)



The next explorer to visit the spot seems to have been Dr. Richard Pococke. From 1737-40 CE he visited the Near East.

Exploring Egypt, Jerusalem, Palestine and Greece. In his book "Description of the East" that appeared
in 1743 he wrote;



"We observed at a great distance, the temple of the Labyrinth, and being about a league from it, I observed several heaps as of ruins, covered with sand, and many stones all round as if there had
been some great building there: they call it the town of Caroon (Bellet Caroon).

It seemed to have been of a considerable breadth from east to west, and the buildings extended on each side towards the north to the Lake Moeris and the temple.

This without doubt is the spot of the famous Labyrinth which Herodotus says was built by the twelve kings of Egypt."



He describes what he takes to be the pyramid of the Labyrinth as a building about 165 feet long by 80 broad, very much ruined, and says it is called the "Castle of Caroon".
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« Reply #18 on: September 28, 2008, 10:17:41 am »











Luigi Canina(1795-1856 CE)



Many attempts have been made to visualize the labyrinth as it existed in the time of Herodotus.

The drawing of the Italian architect and archaeologist Luigi Canina(1795-1856) shows, in plan, one
such reconstruction.

Among Canina’s his works are:



some construction at the Villa Borghese and Casino Vagnuzzi outside of Porta del Popolo in Egyptian style.

He was professor of architecture at Turin, and his most important works were the excavation of Tusculum in 1829 and of the Appian Way in 1848, the results of which he embodied in a number of works published in a costly form by his patroness, the queen of Sardinia.

Canina is also noted for his studies of history and archeology: Ancient architecture described and represented in documents (1830-44).
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« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2008, 10:19:56 am »










                                                      Previous Expeditions





At the beginning of the 19th century Hawara was studied by Napoleon Bonaparte’s famous expedition in Egypt. The French expedition (1799-1800) described the Hawara pyramid, and the pharaonic temple south of it. The remains in the north and the west were wrongly identified as the Labyrinth (Jomard-Caristie 1822) by Jomard who believed that he had discovered the ruins of the Labyrinth.

The first excavations at the site were made by Karl Lepsius, in 1843. Lepsius was commissioned by King Frederich Wilhelm IV of Prussia to lead an expedition to explore and record the remains of the ancient Egyptian civilization. The Prussian expedition was modeled after the earlier Napoléonic mission, and consisted of surveyors, draftsmen, and other specialists.

In Hawara K. R. Lepsius, carried out considerable excavations in the cemetery to the north and on the northern and south-eastern sides of the pyramid and in the area of the Labyrinth and claimed to have established the actual site of the Labyrinth (Lepsius 1849), attaching great importance to a series of brick chambers which they unearthed.

The data furnished by this party, however, were not altogether of a convincing character, and it was felt that further evidence was required before their conclusions could be accepted. Lepsius thought that the structures excavated by his team were parts of the temple of King Amenemhat III, but later research showed that they belonged to Roman tombs. Since the expedition of Lepsius, the place came to be known as a findspot for some high quality royal statues.

The pupil of Lepsius, G. M. Ebers, who did much to popularise the study of Egyptology by a series of novels, said that, if one climbed the pyramid hard by, one could see that the ruins of the Labyrinth had a horseshoe shape, but that was all.
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« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2008, 10:22:47 am »










In 1882 the Italian Luigi Vassalli (1855-1899) started his excavations in the area near the pyramid of Hawara, after having surveyed the site. Vassalli searched in vain for the pyramid's entrance. He also excavated across the Bahr Wahbi, in the village east and south of the Labyrinth and in the necropolis to the north of the pyramid (Vassalli 1867, pp.62-65; Vassali 1885).





The pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology, Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie undertook the first large-scale excavations at Hawara in 1888-1889 and 1910-1911. He revealed attestations of human occupation and activity dating back from the Middle Kingdom to Coptic times.

The first object of Petrie’s archaeological work at Hawara was the study of the Middle Kingdom pyramid.

On the second place he was interested in the Labyrinth of the literary sources. Moreover he extended his activity area towards the area north of the pyramid where he discovered a huge cemetery. The most famous finds revealed by Petrie at the Hawara necropolis are the gilded masks and mummy portraits which he found in the late-Ptolemaïc and Roman tombs, e.g. the wooden panel of Hermione, the schoolteacher, being among the very few surviving examples of painted portraits from Classical Antiquity, the "Faiyum portraits".

In 1888 he first focused on the pyramid and the Labyrinth. He divided the necropolis north of the pyramid in chronological zones ranging from the Middle Kingdom to Byzantine times. Here he found the first Roman mummy portraits and masks.

In 1889 he identified the pyramid as that of the 12th dynasty pharaoh Amenemhat III and his daughter Neferuptah.

He continued working in the burial area in the northern part of the site and cleared a Byzantine basilica north-west of the pyramid.

His successful campaigns attracted other excavators, in search of papyri and mummy portraits.
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« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2008, 10:25:43 am »










The actual site of the Egyptian Labyrinth was most important, finally identified by Professor Flinders Petrie in 1888.

Sufficient of the original foundations remained to enable the size and orientation of the building to be roughly determined. Namely about 304 meters [997 feet] long and 244 meters [800 feet] wide. Large enough to hold the great temples of Karnak and Luxor.

He found that the brick chambers which Lepsius took to be part of the Labyrinth were only remains of the Roman town built by its supposed destroyers.

He concluded that the Labyrinth itself being so thoroughly demolished that only the great bed of fragments remained on top of an artificial stone foundation.

Anyway Petrie drew up a tentative restoration based upon the descriptions of Herodotus and Strabo
so far as these tallied with the scanty remains discovered by him. He speculated that the shrines
which he found formed part of a series of nine, ranged along the foot of the pyramid, each attached
to a columned court, the whole series of courts opening opposite a series of twenty-seven columns arranged down the length of a great hall running east and west; on the other side of this hall would be another series of columned courts, six in number and larger than the others, separated by another long hall from a further series of six.

His finding at Hawara included also scattered bits of foundations, a great well, two door jambs, one to the north and one to the south, two granite shrines and part of another, several fragments of statues and a large granite seated figure of the king, who is still generally recognised to have been the builder of the Labyrinth.

Namely Amenemhet (or Amenemhat) III of the XIIth Dynasty (also known as Lampares), who reigned about twenty-three centuries BCE.
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« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2008, 10:28:00 am »










W.M. Flinders Petrie wrote (Ten Years Digging in Egypt, pp. 91-92):




"Though the pyramid was the main object at Hawara, it was but a lesser part of my work there.

On the south of the pyramid lay a wide mass of chips and fragments of building, which had long generally been identified with the celebrated labyrinth.

Doubts, however, existed, mainly owing to Lepsius having considered the brick buildings on the site to have been part of the labyrinth. When I began to excavate the result was soon plain, that the brick chambers were built on the top of the ruins of a great stone structure; and hence they were only the houses of a village, as they had at first appeared to me to be.

But beneath them, and far away over a vast area, the layers of stone chips were found; and so great was the mass that it was difficult to persuade visitors that the stratum was artificial, and not a natural formation.

Beneath all these fragments was a uniform smooth bed of beton or plaster, on which the pavement of the building had been laid: while on the south side, where the canal had cut across the site, it could be seen how the chip stratum, about six feet thick, suddenly ceased, at what had been the limits of the building.

No trace of architectural arrangement could be found, to help in identifying this great structure with
the labyrinth: but the mere extent of it proved that it was far larger than any temple known in Egypt.

All the temples of Karnak, of Luxor, and a few on the western side of Thebes, might be placed together within the vast space of these buildings at Hawara.

We know from Pliny and others, how for centuries the labyrinth had been a great quarry for the whole district; and its destruction occupied such a body of masons, that a small town existed there.

All this information, and the recorded position of it, agrees so closely with what we can trace, that no doubt can now remain regarding the position of one of the wonders of Egypt."
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« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2008, 10:30:16 am »










In 1911, Petrie returned to Hawara to excavate in the Labyrinth and to find more of the so-called Faiyum portraits on the Roman Period mummies.

As usual, Petrie published his results soon after his work and also depicted partial reconstructions of
the complex within his volumes. These were still mainly based on the classical authors, and only few points depended on the little evidence he found for the original architecture (Petrie et al. 1912).

The crucial information Petrie knew ‘from Pliny and others’ about the disappearance of Labyrinth as a quarry is unscientificly vague and even completly lost for contemporary researchers.

That the whole of the structure of the Labyrinth could have been carried away was certainly a possibility, but it would have been a Herculean feat considering its size and the mass of the stones
used to build it.

If this was indeed the labyrinth described in antiquity, like it is proofed, no act of pillaging could match the total annihilation that should have occurred there.

During Petrie’s absence at Hawara excavations were subsequently undertaken in 1892 by Heinrich Brugsch, J. von Levetzau and von Niemeyer and Richard Von Kaufmann, who all discovered Roman mummy portraits.

In the same year R. von Kaufmann discovered the intact Roman mudbrick chamber of 'Aline' (see now Germer, Kischkewitz and Lüning 1993).

A local dealer discovered four or five portraits and an unknown number of gilded masks

(cf. Drower 1985, p.143).
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« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2008, 10:32:52 am »









In 1910, G. Lefèbvre excavated on the site (cf. Parlasca 1966, p.34; Grimm 1974, p.35) and Petrie resumed his work in the Labyrinth and in the Roman cemetery, again finding lots of mummy portraits.

Among other parts of the site the area east of the pyramid was further excavated in more recent times by the Inspectorate of Faiyum Antiquities worked in the necropolis north and east of the pyramid and by the Egyptian archaeologists by



Fathi Melek and Hishmat Adib (1972),

Motawi Balboush (1974) and el-Khouli (1983).



(see the reports in Leclant 1973, p.404; Leclant 1975, p.208-209, and Leclant 1984, p.370)

The entrance to the pyramid was cleared by A. Al-Bazidy in 1995.

 




The last survey before the Mataha-expedition of the site was undertaken in 2000 by a Belgian mission.

From 5 to 23 March 2000 the Catholic University of Leuven mapped the architectural remains visible on the surface.

The complementary study of the surface pottery resulted in a chronological framework of the different areas of the site and in a representative catalogue of the Hawara ceramics covering the period between the Middle Kingdom (ca. 2000 BCE) and the 10th century CE.

Inge Uytterhoeven (field director Hawara 2000 survey) of the Leuven University expects to publish the survey report in fall 2008.
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« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2008, 10:35:48 am »










                                                 Total Expedition Time Line






1800 31 December: survey by two engineers of the French expedition, Caristie and Martin, published by Jomard in "Description de l'Egypte, Antiquités, volume IV (Pancoucke edition, Paris1821), 478-485 Comment: valuable as the first scientific survey, carried out earlier than the cutting of the Bahr Wahbi canal across the site



1818 Labyrinth Field examination by Giovanni Battista Belzoni, as decribed in his book: "Narrative of the Operations and Recent discoveries within the pyramids, temples,tombs and excavations in Egypt and Nubia; and a journey to the coast of the Red Sea, in search of ancient Berenice; and another in the oasis of Jupiter Ammon (1820). After Belzoni’s early death in 1823, Sarah Banne his wife and travel companion still lived for many years in Brussels (Belgium).



1820s: date uncertain: survey by John Gardner Wilkinson, published in his "Modern Egypt and Thebes, being a description of Egypt, including the information required for travellers in that country, volume II (London, 1843), 337-340



1837: survey by Howard Vyse and Perring, published in their "Operations carried on at the Pyramids of Gizeh in 1837, volume III (London, 1842), 82-83 Comment: first record of the present canal across the site



1840s: survey and excavation by the expedition under Richard Lepsius, published in his "Denkmaeler aus Aegypten und Aethiopen I (Berlin, 1849), plates 46-49, with posthumous publication of his notes in "Denkmaeler Text II (Berlin, 1904), 11-30 Comment: this is the most accurate published account of the site, from a time when the ruins of the Hellenistic and Roman village survived over the area of the Labyrinth. (Lepsius interpreted those ruins as part of the original complex.)



1862 August: excavations around the site by Luigi Vassalli, published in the journal "Recueil de Travaux 6 (1885), 37-41



1888-1889: excavations and survey by William Matthew Flinders Petrie, published in his reports "Hawara, Biahmu and Arsinoe" (London,1889) and "Kahun, Gurob and Hawara" (London, 1890): his letters home are now in the Griffith Institute, Oxford (the 'Petrie Journals'), and his pocket books (the 'Petrie Notebooks') are in the Petrie Museum (published with Secure Data Services in the Petrie Museum Archives CD-ROM, 1999) Comment: the main achievement of Petrie lies in his survey of the pyramid and its inner chambers, and in his discovery and rescue of the famous encaustic mummy portraits from the Roman Period burials north of the pyramid. In other areas the quality of his work falls below modern standards, reflecting the early date in the history of archaeology and in his own career. His survey of the area around the pyramid is inadequately recorded, and most of the tombs were emptied by workmen without Petrie himself ever seeing the finds in place.



1892: exploration of the Roman Period cemeteries at Hawara by R. v. Kaufmann, mentioned as the discoverer of a group burial containing eight mummies, in "Renate Germer, Das Geheimnis der Mumien, Ewiges Leben am Nil (Berlin 1998), 150-151



1911: excavation of the Labyrinth area and the Hellenistic and Roman Period cemeteries by William Matthew Flinders Petrie, published in his "The Labyrinth, Gerzeh and Mazghuneh (London 1912), and "Roman Portraits and Memphis IV" (London 1911) Comment: in this season Petrie uncovered some of the most remarkable sculpture fragments, as well as more structures within the area of the Labyrinth.



1973 Fathi Melek and Hishmat Adib excavated 1972 some shaft tombs of the Middle and New Kingdom (Orientalia 42 (1973), 404)



In June 1974 excavated a mission of the Service des Antiquités under the direction of Motawi Balboush in the east of the pyramid from Hawara. They found the undisturbed tomb of a certain "Kheif Maakht". The tomb is not yet published, cf. Orientalia 44 (1975), 208-9



1984 Ali el-Khouli excavated 1983 about 20 tombs of the New Kingdom, Orientalia 53 (1984), 370



2000 Belgian survey "the Hawara 2000 surface-survey of the Faiyum Project" (Netherlands-Flemish Institute in Cairo) (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven - Section: Ancient History). - Willy Clarysse (General director) - Inge Uytterhoeven (Field director) - Anny Cottry (Photographer) - Katrien Cousserier (Archaeologist) - Bart Demarsin (Archaeologist) - Lieven Loots (Archaeologist) - Sylvie Marchand (Pottery specialist - IFAO) - Veerle Muyldermans (Archaeologist) - Ilona Regulski (Egyptologist) - Katrien Slechten (Archaeologist) > - Ayman Mohammad Sedik el-Hakim (Inspector) - Ashraf Sobhy Rezkalla (Inspector)



21 april 2004 Groundwater examination of Hawara, by Keatings, K.; Tassie, G.J.; Flower, R.J.; Hassan, F.A.; Hamdan, M.A.R.; Hughes, M.; Arrowsmith, Carol. Published in Geoarchaeology magazine, volume 22 (n°5) 2007 Wiley interscience



2008 February-March Mataha-Expedition: the Egyptian-Belgian geophysic research of the Hawara Necropolis (Pyramid + Labyrinth) by the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics and Ghent University. Associate Prof. dr. Abbas Mohamed Abbas (National Research Institute of Astronomy & Geophysics, with the support of Ghent University. General Director of the NRIAG Geophysic Survey was Associate Prof. dr. Abbas Mohamed Abbas (National Research Institute of Astronomy & Geophysics and Member of the Egyptian Committee of the Protection of Antiquities from Environmental Effects).



March 2008 additional survey of the Hawara pyramid (Cairo University - Wroclaw University). General Director Prof. Dr. Alaaeldin Shaheen, Dean of the Faculty of Archaeology of Cairo University
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« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2008, 10:37:17 am »










Labyrinth Bibliography



Arnold, D., Das Labyrinth und seine Vorbilder, Mitteilungen des Deutschen archäologischen Institus Kairo 35 (1979), 1-9

Arnold, D., Lexikon der Ägyptologie, entry: Labyrinth, 905-907

Blom-Boer, I., Sculpture Fragments and Relief Fragments from the Labyrinth at
Hawara in the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden, OMRO 69 (1989), 25-50.
Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden, OMRO 69 (1989), 25-50

Lepsius, R., Denkmäler, I, 46-48, Berlin 1897

Lepsius, R., Denkmäler, Textband II, 11-30, Berlin 1849

Lloyd, A.B., The Egyptian Labyrinth, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 56 (1970), 81-100

Michalowski, K. The Labyrinth Enigma: Archaeological Suggestions, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 54 (1968), 219-222

Obsomer, C. in: Amosiadès (Mélanges offert au professur Claude Vandersleyen par anciens étudiants, Louvain-la-Neuve 1992), 221-324  Petrie, W.M.F., Hawara, Biahmu and Arsinoe, London 1889

Petrie, W.M.F., Kahun, Gurob, and Hawara, London 1890

Petrie, W.M.F., Wainwright, G.A. and Mackay, E., The Labyrinth, Gerzeh and Mazghuneh, (British School of Archaeology in Egypt and Egyptian Research Account, 18th Year) London 1912

Uphill, E.P., Pharaoh´s Gateway to Eternity, The Hawara Labyrinth of King Amenemhat III, London 2000

O. Kimball Armayor, Herodotus' Autopsy of the Fayoum: Lake Moeris and the Labyrinth of Egypt (Gieben, Amsterdam 1985).

Geryl P., The Orion Prophecy, Adventures Unlimited Press 2002

Herman Kern,  Through the Labyrinth; Designs and Meanings over 5,000 Years, Prestel 1982

W.H.Matthews, Mazes & Labyrinths: Their History & Development, Dover Publications, New York 1970

Joyce Tyldesley, Egypt: How a Lost Civilisation Was Rediscovered, BBC Books 2007

Albert Slosman, L’Astronomie selon les Egyptiens, Laffont Paris 1983

Kevin Keatings & co, An Examination of Groundwater within the Hawara Pyramid, Egypt
Geoarchaeology magazine, volume 22 (n°5) 2007 Wiley interscience

Colin Renfrew, figuring it out,  The parallel visions of artists and archaeologists, Thames & Hudson 2003
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« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2008, 10:39:00 am »










Mataha-expedition team

The Mataha-expedition is a project of joint forces, which would not been possible without the initial and encouraging support of Zahi Hawass, the president of the Supreme Council of Antiquities. The scan-project is coordinated and funded by Louis De Cordier, and realized by the Nriag with the support of Ghent University/Kunst-Zicht.

 

Supreme Council of Antiquities

The Mataha-expedition was personally granted to take place by Dr. Zahi Hawass,
the Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities. The SCA is part of the Egyptian Ministry of Culture and is responsible for the conservation, protection and regulation of all antiquities and archaeological excavations in Egypt.

Dr. Zahi Hawass has since longtime been forcefully working to realize the preservation of the Hawara Pyramid and necropolis. With encouraging support Dr. Zahi Hawass gave his permission to conduct the geophysic research of the Hawara Necropolis in order to prepare for preservation works, and to map the archaeological underground. The research was helpfully supervised by SCA councillor Prof. Dr. Moustafa Kamel El-Ghamrawy (Faculty of Engineering, Azhar University, Cairo) and supported by SCA councillor Prof. Dr. Alaaeldin Shaheen (dean Faculty of Archaeology Cairo University), who already started in July 2008 with the first renovations works at Hawara.

 

NRIAG

The Mataha cooperation with Ghent University was personally encouraged by the president of the National Research institute of Astronomy and Geophysics Prof. Dr. Salah M. Mahmoud and Dr. El-Said Ahmed Al-Sayed (apllied & environmental geophysics). The Mataha geophysic research is realized by the geophysicists of the NRIAG under the general direction of Associate Prof. dr. Abbas Mohammed Abbas (member of the Egyptian committee of the protection of antiquities from environmental effects). The National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG) is one of the oldest scientific institutions in Egypt. It was founded in Boulac (Cairo) in 1839 as an Astronomical Observatory. In 1865, it was transferred to Abbassia (Cairo). Finally, it was transferred to its current location (Helwan) in 1903. From that time up till now and along this time span of more than a century NRIAG has witnessed large developments and expansion phases in several disciplines such as Astronomy, Space research, Solar Research, Seismology, Geomagnetism, Geoelectric, Geothermal, Gravimetry, Geodesy, Geodynamics, and recently Crustal Movements. Nowadays NRIAG plays an important application role in the national development plan of Egypt.

 

Ghent University/Kunst-Zicht

Specially for the Mataha-expedition, Ghent University established a partnership with the NRIAG to corporate the geophysic scanning at Hawara. Ghent University has bundled a wide range of international partnerships, in which the cooperation with the NRIAG is framed. The Ghent University started the involvement in the geophysical survey to contribute to the preservation of the antiquities at Hawara and to support the contemporary art& science project by Louis De Cordier, framing in the new cross-bordering approach of the Ghent University Kunst-Zicht unit, directed by curator Guy Bovyn (Ghent University Department of Communication, curator Contemporary Art Ghent University; coordinator of the postgraduate program 'Exhibition and Conservation of Contemporary Art'). Ghent University is one of the most important institutions of higher education and research in Europe, with a worldwide high scientific & innovative reputation. Ghent University yearly attracts over 30,000 students, with a foreign student population of over 2,200 EU and non-EU citizens. Ghent University offers a broad range of study programs in all academic and scientific branches. With a view to corporate in research and community service, numerous research groups, centers and institutes have been founded over the years. Ghent University distinguishes itself as a socially committed and pluralistic university in a broad international perspective. At the basis of all education and research lie curiosity and ambition. Both on the regional and international level Ghent University has developed an extensive network, which is extended year by year. Ghent University wants its students and researchers to push frontiers. Curious and ambitious people shape the future world. A philosophy that was encouraged last year in the Ghent University publicity campaign with the slogan: "Dare to think" (Durf denken). Many thanks to Prof. Dr. Paul Van Cauwenberge (Rector Ghent University),  Prof. dr. Morgan De Dapper (Department of Geography, unit morphology & geo-archaeology), Prof. dr. Frank Vermeulen (Department of Archaeology), Guy Bovyn (Department of Communication, Ghent University curator Contemporary Art Ghent University; coordinator of the postgraduate program 'Exhibition and Conservation of Contemporary Art'), Prof. Dr. Peter Vandenabeele (Ghent University, Department of Archaeology and ancient history of Europe), Prof. Dr. Johan Braeckman (Ghent University, Department of Philosophy), Kaat Van de Velde (communication), Tom De Smedt (communication), Karen Wulgaert (apprentice).

 

Louis De Cordier

Contemporary artist Louis De Cordier is the expedition coordinator. The vision of the Mataha-expedition is seen by Louis De Cordier as an early foray of a holistic movement to enable research and innovation through the cooperation of varied art & science disciplines. Devoted to the preservation and investigation of Egyptian antiquities, he started the project with a series of private lectures, funding the project with the sale profits of the Golden Sun Disk. A timepiece designed by Louis De Cordier to ignite the global fire of comprehensive awareness and awakening. An opener of ways to meditate about our human condition and the destiny of our species. The record incorporates sacred geometry, earth sciences and astronomy. Its message reflects the state of Man, broken free, wandering endlessly around in an ever-changing space. The sculpture is a place for rest, a sacred instrument for moving through this dynamic and chaotic spacetime. The Golden Sun Disk, an archaeological artifact of the future, is an expression of artistic and technological creation and a symbol of human-scaled introspection. In the eventuality of the fall of civilization, the design of the time piece conceals the power and hope to transmit its content to very distant generations. For more info about his works and projects see > www.louisdecordier.com.
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« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2008, 10:40:46 am »










Thanks To





Horus Foundation

The HORUS Foundation (Herodotus Original Research Using Science) is an American non-profit organization founded by Frank Clark (US) and Mark Beaver (US). The foundation assembled experts and state-of-the-art technologies from the aerospace industry to maximize archaeologic research, in relation to the written records of Herodotus. The Horus foundation contributed to the geophysic survey with providing the NRIAG logistical support to obtain the Supreme Council of Antiquity permission to scan at Hawara.



Golden Sun Disk

The Mataha-expedition team wants to thank all the people who funded the project with the acquisition of a Golden Sun Disk for their encouraging support. Gratefulness to art curator Andree van de Kerckhove for the organisation of the Labyrinth exhibition (Tabularium #05 CBK Delft), and the production of the first Golden Sun Disk.



Cairo University

The Mataha-expedition team wants to thank Prof. Dr. Alaaeldin Shaheen, the Dean of the Faculty of Archaeology of Cairo University, and is looking forward to cooperate in the near future to proceed the preservation and renovation of the Hawara archaeological site.



Leuven University

Gratitude to Prof. Dr. Willy Clarysse & Dr. Inge Uyterhoeven (archaeologist), the team-leaders  of the "Hawara 2000 surface survey” for their interest, practical information and help in the research of the Hawara history.



Association Egyptologique Reine Elisabeth

Many thanks to the AERE Board of directors for their human network support.
The Association Egyptologique Reine Elisabeth was founded in memory of the Belgian Queen Elisabeth's visit to the tomb of Tutankhamun, on February 18, 1923. Its main purpose was to stimulate egyptological and papyrological research in Belgium. Over the years the association has become a scholarly institution, which promotes the study of the history and civilisation of Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman and Christian Egypt.



UNESCO

Many thanks for the encouraging UNESCO presence on the workshop in Cairo, and hopefully the support regarding the future of Hawara. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization seeks to encourage the identification, protection and preservation of cultural and natural heritage around the world considered to be of outstanding value to humanity. This is embodied in an international treaty called the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage.



Isel Foundation

Many thanks to Peter Cooreman and Ilse Adam of the Isel foundation for the personal support. The Isel Foundation is a private foundation situated in Merelbeke, Belgium. The foundation publishes its own Isel magazine, but is in the first place a cultural platform where artists, cultural organisations and companies meet and are promoted. The foundation supported the Mataha-project by organizing several Labyrinth lectures, bringing the right people together to start the project’s realization.



Patrick Geryl

The Mataha expedition should never been possible without the beneficent help of author and independent researcher Patrick Geryl. Since many years Patrick Geryl researched the Labyrinth of Egypt. Experienced as team member of the Giza plateau geophysic scanning (2006), Geryl introduced Louis De Cordier to the Egyptian National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics in December 2007. Opening the way to the effective realisation in Egypt. In his books, Patrick Geryl continues his scientific analysis with the millennia-old codes of the Maya and Egyptians. He determines that both cultures arose from a lost antediluvian civilization, which was able to calculate previous polar shifts and that we should take very seriously their calculations, that place the next reversal in 2012. Geryl expects in his books that the labyrinth of Egypt will contain the Circle of Gold, the forgotten hall of records of this ancient civilization, as an ultimate message for humanity .
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« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2008, 10:42:01 am »










Support





People can support the project on many ways, at the current stage much needs to be done. The most important thing right now is to raise global interest for Hawara.
This can be done by making your network aware by producing weblogs, articles, a mailing…

To open the possibility for companies to sponser the ongoing Mataha-project with a tax-deductible donation, the Mataha-team started with establishment of a non-profit organisation cooperated by the King Baudouin Foundation & King Baudouin Foundation United States. The Mataha Foundation will be operational in October 2008. For more info contact >

 

King Baudouin Foundation

21 rue Brederodestraat - B-1000 Brussels - Belgium
T +32 (0)2 511 1840, Fax +32.2.500.54.88, info@kbs-frb.be

King Baudouin Foundation United States
Jean Paul Warmoes Executive Secretary
10 Rockefeller Plaza, 16th Floor - New York - NY 10020
T (212) 713 7660, Fax (212) 713 7665, jeanpaul@kbfus.org
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