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Kensington Runestone

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Thor, God of Thunder
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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2007, 02:24:51 am »

Conclusion

The Kensington Runestone is either a 19th century forgery or an important archaeological find from the 14th century. Those who ascribe a Scandinavian origin to the stone claim it shows evidence of obscure medieval runes and intersecting word forms which would have been unknown to potential forgers in the 1800s. These advocates tend to be enthusiastic but may lack professional credentials. Interested professional archaeologists, historians and Scandinavian linguists tend to question the stone's provenance. Any discussion of the runestone (such as suggesting the runestone's runes were used by 19th century guilds, or that the knoll on which it was found may have been a small island 600 years earlier) is fraught with opportunities for misinterpretation and speculation.

By 2002 further analysis by Nielsen suggested the stone's linguistics were plausible for the 14th century. Evidence for all of the unusual word and rune forms has reportedly been found in medieval sources. Historically, it appears there may have been an exploratory trip beyond Greenland in the year mentioned on the stone and geochemical analysis suggests the stone was buried prior to the first documented arrival of Europeans in the region.

In a joint statement for a 2004 exhibition of the stone at the Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm, Nielsen and Henrik Williams, a professor of Scandinavian Languages at Uppsala University and a proponent of the forgery theory, noted there were linguistic discrepancies for both 14th and 19th century origins of the inscription and that the runestone "requires further study before a secure conclusion can be reached." This was a rare instance in which the academic community and runestone enthusiasts found something upon which they could agree.



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Thor, God of Thunder
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« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2007, 02:25:48 am »



Edward Larsson's notes
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