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CHESAPEAKE BAY-Watermen Fear Blue Crab Not Coming Back-HISTORY OF BAY


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Author Topic: CHESAPEAKE BAY-Watermen Fear Blue Crab Not Coming Back-HISTORY OF BAY  (Read 439 times)
Bianca
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« on: July 16, 2008, 11:01:51 am »



A skipjack, part of the oystering fleet in Maryland










Fishing industry
 


The bay was once known for its great seafood production, especially blue crabs, clams and oysters. The plentiful oyster harvests led to the development of the skipjack, the state boat of Maryland, which is the only remaining working boat type in the United States still under sail power.

Other characteristic bay area workboats include:



the log canoe

the pungy

the bugeye

the Chesapeake Bay deadrise



Today, the body of water is less productive than it used to be, because of runoff from urban areas (mostly on the Western Shore) and farms (especially on the Eastern Shore), overharvesting, and invasion of foreign species. The bay though, still yields more fish and shellfish (about 45,000 short tons or 40,000 tonnes yearly) than any other estuary in the United States.

The bay is famous for its rockfish, also known as striped bass. Once on the verge of extinction, rockfish have made a significant comeback due to legislative action that put a moratorium on rockfishing, which allowed the species to repopulate. Rockfish are now able to be fished in strictly controlled and limited quantities.

Oyster farming is a growing industry for the bay to help maintain the bay's productivity as well as a natural effort for filtering impurities in the bay in an effort to reduce the disastrous effects of man-made pollution.

In 2005, local governments began debate on the introduction to certain parts of the bay of a species of Asian oyster, to revive the lagging shellfish industry.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2008, 11:15:02 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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