Atlantis Online
November 19, 2018, 05:44:58 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Scientists to drill beneath oceans
http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,8063.0.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Balkan caves, gorges were pre-Neanderthal haven

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Balkan caves, gorges were pre-Neanderthal haven  (Read 246 times)
Cassandra
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4013



« on: June 29, 2008, 05:28:23 am »

Balkan caves, gorges were pre-Neanderthal haven
Fri Jun 27, 2008 11:25am EDT

1 of 3Full Size
Related News
Greenland ice cores show clues to climate change
19 Jun 2008
 
powered by  Sphere
Featured Broker sponsored link
Learn to Trade with a FREE Guide.By Ljilja Cvekic

BELGRADE (Reuters Life!) - A fragment of a human jaw found in Serbia and believed to be up to 250,000 years old is helping anthropologists piece together the story of prehistoric human migration from Africa to Europe.

"This is the earliest evidence we have of humans in the area," Canada's Winnipeg University anthropology professor Mirjana Roksandic told Reuters.

The fragment of a lower jaw, complete with three teeth, was discovered in a small cave in the Sicevo gorge in south Serbia.

"It is a pre-Neanderthal jaw that we believe is between 130,000 to 250,000 years old," said Belgrade University archaeology professor Dusan Mihailovic, head of the team studying the jaw.

"It could help us explain better the human evolution and implications of movements of the population and culture across a large territory," he said.

Anthropologists believe Africa was the birthplace of man, who then migrated northwards into the Middle East and Europe, possibly in reaction to climate changes.

During the periodic ice ages northern Europe would have been covered in ice, so the theory is these early humans stayed in the easier climate of southern Europe.

The jaw might belong to homo erectus, the first type of human to walk upright, who appeared in Africa 1.8 million years ago and was the precursor of both modern man, or homo sapiens, and the separate species of Neanderthal man.

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSL2768278020080627
Report Spam   Logged

Cassandra
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4013



« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2008, 05:30:00 am »



 

An undated handout photo shows members of an archaeological team examining a small cave in the Sicevo gorge in south Serbia. A fragment of a human jaw found in Serbia and believed to be up to 250,000 years old is helping anthropologists piece together the story of prehistoric human migration from Africa to Europe.

REUTERS/Handout (REUTERS).
Report Spam   Logged
Cassandra
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4013



« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2008, 05:31:08 am »



An undated handout photo shows members of an archaeological team examining a small cave in the Sicevo gorge in south Serbia. A fragment of a human jaw found in Serbia and believed to be up to 250,000 years old is helping anthropologists piece together the story of prehistoric human migration from Africa to Europe.

REUTERS/Handout (REUTERS
Report Spam   Logged
Cassandra
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4013



« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2008, 05:32:35 am »



An undated handout photo shows Professor Dusan Mihailovic examining a fragment of a human jaw. The fragment found in Serbia and believed to be up to 250,000 years old is helping anthropologists piece together the story of prehistoric human migration from Africa to Europe. The fragment of a lower jaw, complete with three teeth, was discovered in a small cave in the Sicevo gorge in south Serbia.

REUTERS/Handout (SERBIA).
Report Spam   Logged
Cassandra
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4013



« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2008, 05:33:56 am »

The jaw was found at a depth of four meters, below a Neanderthal village in a linked cave, one of the richest archaeological sites in the region.

The remains of a hearth, primitive stone and bone tools and animals indicated an 80,000 year old home base.

"What we found there was enough to reconstruct the way of living, changes in culture, climate, vegetation and animal life during a longer period of some 50,000 years," Mihailovic said.

"The fact we found a jaw so many layers below the settlement is additional proof the jaw is much older."

Archaeologists started digging deeper initially in the hope of finding more fossil remains.

"We were looking for Neanderthals," Roksandic said, "but this is much better."

Neanderthals, viewed as a evolutionary dead-end, died out about 30,000 years ago.

(Additional reporting by Tanja Cvekic, Editing by Ellie Tzortzi and Matthew Jones)

Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy