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News: Has the Location of the Center City of Atlantis Been Identified?
http://www.mysterious-america.net/hasatlantisbeenf.html
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 01:16:19 am 
Started by Christian Kielbasa - Last post by Christian Kielbasa
Striking similarities are shown in this 90 second video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhbIc3jkh0M

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 08:29:56 pm 
Started by Critias - Last post by Critias



I have to say that the one thing wholly impractical about the Atlantis story is how it was transferred over the ages in a time before writing even came about (That we know about anyway) and before either the Egyptians or the Greeks were even a people. The further back we set it, the more of a problem this becomes. I thought for a time that the story was inscribed in Sais, Egypt, perhaps on a pillar, but logically, that would then make Sais (and Athens, according to the dialogues) much older than it is given credit for.

I don't see anything impractical about that. Actually, the Egyptian priest, Sonchis, tells us that there was writing in Atlantis and then after the destruction it disappeared. The people that survived started from the begging. The only people to survive the ages were the Egyptians. It implies that the Egyptians always wrote things down, they never lost the art of writing. Yes, Sais is at least 10 years old. it is a thousand year younger than Athens. If Athens existed in 9,600 B.C (11,600 years ago) then it makes Sais aver 10 k.

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 06:25:07 pm 
Started by Arturo - Last post by Arturo
Teaching a gorilla to talk

https://youtu.be/s1HcU7taTbo

A western lowland gorilla named Koko was taught from an early age to use sign language.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 06:21:52 pm 
Started by FLOR_DE_LIS - Last post by Arturo
It's no sense in expressing reason with him as he has apparently come here to engage in juvenile banter as well as post inane music videos.

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 05:03:34 pm 
Started by FLOR_DE_LIS - Last post by Arcturus
Quote
And even if ships and sailing were already in vogue, how were those ships to get to the center island when land was in the way?

I think you need to read the dialogues more thoroughly, as Plato clearly mentions a central canal leading from the ocean, through the circles, to the capital city.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 05:00:03 pm 
Started by Critias - Last post by Arcturus
Quote
I want to give you another detail: I strongly believe that the person that gave the first account of the catastrophe to the Egyptians was someone who was present. There is no way someone could have made this kind of description without being a witness. He/she said that it rained during the day and then all night. In the morning the city was gone. Also, how did he know that the earth sucked all the Greeks in? One more thing: why didn’t he say anything about the Atlanteans? Could have said that all the Atlantians inside the city disappeared? It was a big city after all … it’s killing me that most likely we’ll never find out the truth about this point in the story ….. 12 k has passed and there is no way that something like human remains or clothing will be present. Only big rock and hopefully golden statues will be presents. I don’t know about metallic tools.


I have to say that the one thing wholly impractical about the Atlantis story is how it was transferred over the ages in a time before writing even came about (That we know about anyway) and before either the Egyptians or the Greeks were even a people. The further back we set it, the more of a problem this becomes. I thought for a time that the story was inscribed in Sais, Egypt, perhaps on a pillar, but logically, that would then make Sais (and Athens, according to the dialogues) much older than it is given credit for.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 03:29:55 am 
Started by Spectrum - Last post by Spectrum
http://blogs.ancestry.com/cm/2014/02/20/titanic-mystery-solved-with-dna-testing/?o_xid=59263&o_lid=59263&o_sch=Content+Marketing&utm_source=outbrain&utm_term=614938

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 03:28:37 am 
Started by Spectrum - Last post by Spectrum
NASA 'whistleblower' Gives Photos to Roswell's UFO Museum
International UFO Museum and Research Center Roswell New 06 Jun
Associated Press | Jun 06, 2016


ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) A former National Aeronautics and Space Administration consultant pilot who says photos and films from Apollo missions were doctored has donated material to Roswell's UFO Museum.

The Roswell Daily Record reports (http://goo.gl/t6BkuY) Ralph Kennedy Johnston, Sr. gave last week digital copies of his three books to the International UFO Museum and Research Center.

Johnston says he has not donated the material to other institutions, although some copies of some photos are available online.

Johnston, a former trainer of astronauts and Belen resident, has said he saw NASA staff painting details out of lunar photos from Apollo missions. He believes the photos pointed to evidence of extraterrestrial activity on the moon.

Johnston was later fired from NASA. The agency has denied any existence of life on the moon.

___

Information from: Roswell Daily Record, http://www.roswell-record.com

Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


http://www.military.com/off-duty/off-beat/2016/06/06/nasa-whistleblower-gives-photos-roswell-ufo-museum.html

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 02:02:08 am 
Started by Specter - Last post by Specter
All men have limits: Batman's superpowers questioned by scientists

The caped crusader’s flight speed would likely kill him, physics students find, but Superman’s gifts make him the mightiest
Michael Keaton in the 1989 film of Batman.



A serious danger to himself and not much help to others ... Michael Keaton in the 1989 film of Batman. Photograph: Sportsphoto Ltd/Allstar

Alison Flood

Thursday 16 June 2016 08.24 EDT
Last modified on Thursday 16 June 2016 08.26 EDT

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Research from the University of Leicester has deemed Batman to be the “most ill-equipped” of the superheroes, claiming that the velocities Gotham City’s finest reaches when gliding through the air would be likely to kill him on landing.

In a series of papers published over the last seven years in the Journal of Physics Special Topics and Journal of Interdisciplinary Science Topics, students at Leicester have examined the viability of a range of superhero characters. Superman, they have determined, would be “best equipped” to prevail among the contenders they have studied, which include the Flash, Thor and Iron Man.

Looking at everything from the Man of Steel’s muscle tissue – his skin density “would have to be 296 g/cm3 to stop 50% of standard handgun bullets” – to how he reverses the polarity of the Earth’s spin (he increases his relativistic mass by 13.7m times by travelling close to the speed of light, they write), Superman is the “the number one candidate for ‘most powerful superhero’”.

He is followed by Wolverine, whose lunge at an enemy while on top of a train was calculated by the students at at least 1300N, “based on his adamantium-reinforced skeleton’s mass and density (acknowledging that osmium is the closest thing to adamantium in terms of density)”. Next is master of disguise Mystique: “ATP, TYR, MC1R, IRF4 and SLC24A4 are probably the first genes to be mutated to bring about the biggest difference in skin, hair and eyes,” write the students, speculating that “her ability to alter skin patterns may be similar to that of cuttlefish or Japanese rice fish in terms of genes involved – such as SLC2A15 and PAX7A”.

The students predict a “seemingly grim end result” for Batman, however. “Looking at the case for gliding from a fairly tall building of … 150 m, Batman can glide to a distance of about 350 m, which is reasonable; the problem with the glide lies in his velocity as he reaches ground level. The velocity rises rapidly to a maximum of a little over 110 kilometres an hour before steadying to a constant speed of around 80. At these high speeds any impact would likely be fatal if not severely damaging (consider impact with a car travelling at these speeds) … Clearly gliding using a batcape is not a safe way to travel, unless a method to rapidly slow down is used, such as a parachute.”

The university said that “this inability to perform even the simplest of superhero feats suggest Batman would struggle to get off the ground, let alone save Gotham from the likes of the Joker and Bane”.

James Kakalios, a physics professor at the University of Minnesota and author of The Physics of Superheroes, praised the students’ “excellent research”, but said they had forgotten to consider a major aspect of Batman’s strength.

“Batman may indeed be at the bottom of the list, when one considers raw firepower, but they have not properly weighted Batman’s greatest asset – his mind. Batman always has a plan, and with enough time and resources, he has demonstrated an ability to singlehandedly take down every member of the Justice League,” said Kakalios, pointing to the Tower of Babel storyline from 2000, which he said sees the villain Ra’s al Ghul use the contingency plans developed by Batman to incapacitate superheroes including Superman, Green Lantern, the Flash and Wonder Woman.

The caped crusader demonstrates “our greatest superpower - our intelligence,” said Kakalios, which “has made us the dominant species on the planet, despite being at a competitive disadvantage in terms of strength, speed or durability compared to the animal kingdom”.

Science or magic? UK scientists test reality of Harry Potter spells

The academic agreed with the students’ analysis of Superman, saying that his “unique combo-platter of powers places him at the top of the superhero ziggurat.

“However, they have again neglected to address Superman’s greatest power. Not flight, or super-strength or x-ray vision, but rather, super-responsibility. Able to take over the planet without breaking a sweat – do Kryptonians sweat? – Superman has never used his powers for selfish or personal reasons. In this way, he sets an example for us all. For we all have abilities and gifts, and how we choose to use them determines what type of person we are, and the world that we will make,” said Kakalios.



https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jun/16/batmans-superpowers-questioned-by-scientific-study-superman

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 02:00:22 am 
Started by Specter - Last post by Specter
Batman would be 'ill-equipped' say scientists
Posted on Saturday, 25 June, 2016



Could Batman really glide from the rooftops ? Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 Pop Culture Geek
Researchers at the University of Leicester have determined that Batman would be rubbish in real life.
He might be able to defeat the villains of Gotham with ease in the movies, but according to a recent study by physics students in the UK, the Caped Crusader's physical attributes would make him woefully ill-equipped to glide from buildings in the real world.

The problem stems from the fact that he would simply hit the ground with too much force.

"Looking at the case for gliding from a fairly tall building of 150m, Batman can glide to a distance of about 350m, which is reasonable; the problem with the glide lies in his velocity as he reaches ground level," the team wrote in a research paper on the subject.

"The velocity rises rapidly to a maximum of a little over 110 kilometres an hour before steadying to a constant speed of around 80. At these high speeds any impact would likely be fatal if not severely damaging. Clearly gliding using a batcape is not a safe way to travel, unless a method to rapidly slow down is used, such as a parachute."

"This inability to perform even the simplest of superhero feats suggest Batman would struggle to get off the ground, let alone save Gotham from the likes of the Joker and Bane."

The researchers also conducted a similar analysis of other superheroes including Superman who they determined would need a skin density of 296 g/cm^3 to stop a handgun bullet.

They concluded that the Man of Steel was the best equipped to succeed out of all comic book superheroes whereas contenders such as Wolverine, Iron Man and Thor didn't make the cut.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jun/16/batmans-superpowers-questioned-by-scientific-study-superman

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