Atlantis Online
November 23, 2014, 02:24:24 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Ancient Crash, Epic Wave
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/11/14/healthscience/web.1114meteor.php?page=1

 
   Home   Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 02:02:24 am 
Started by Vlad the Impaler - Last post by Vlad the Impaler

 2 
 on: Today at 02:01:58 am 
Started by Vlad the Impaler - Last post by Vlad the Impaler

Bulgarian archaeologists find skeleton of child buried with anti-vampire ritual

Written by The Sofia Globe staff on October 30, 2014 in Bulgaria - Comments Off
voden archaeology
inShare

The skeleton of a child whose legs had been bound after death in an anti-vampire ritual has been found by archaeologists at a dig at the Voden Fortress in the Rhodopes, according to the head of the Assenovgrad Historical Museum, Ivan Doukov.

Three “vampire” skeletons were found this autumn during the archaeological dig at the fortress, near a village that dates back to Roman and ultimately Thracian times.

Local media quoted Doukov as saying that in the case of one of the other bodies, the legs were tied after death, and in the other case, the feet were severed.

So-called “vampire” burials in Bulgaria, involving remains dating back to medieval times, have excited considerable interest.

Earlier in October, at the Perperikon site, the skeleton of a man was found with a ploughshare driven through its ribcage. The skeleton was said to date from the 13th century CE. Driving a ploughshare through the ribcage was among rituals, like tying the legs or placing stones on the chest, intended to prevent the dead becoming undead.

The Assenovgrad museum’s Doukov said that medieval people were very superstitious.

“They believed that if someone in his lifetime was a bad person or if he died under unusual circumstances, he could become a vampire and harass his living relatives.”

Doukov said that such superstitions still exist in the Rhodope Mountains and northwestern Bulgaria. They are very similar to medieval beliefs about vampires and other malicious beings.

In August, Doukov announced that 30 graves dating from the 30th century, most of them of children, as well as a Thracian burial from the fifth to sixth century BCE had been uncovered at the Voden fortress above the town.

At a news conference earlier this year, Perperikon archaeological chief Professor Nikolai Ovcharov said that the highest incidence of graves where indications of anti-vampire rituals were found was in the Rila and Rhodope mountain areas.

These were places where Christianity was in a weaker position against enduring pagan traditions, he said. Such rituals continued at least into the time of Ottoman rule in Bulgaria, he said.

(Archive photo of excavations at Voden Fortress: BNR)

http://sofiaglobe.com/2014/10/30/bulgarian-archaeologists-find-skeleton-of-child-buried-with-anti-vampire-ritual/

 3 
 on: Today at 12:48:49 am 
Started by Lair of the White Worm - Last post by Lair of the White Worm

 4 
 on: Today at 12:47:16 am 
Started by Lair of the White Worm - Last post by Lair of the White Worm

Peruvian dig reveals sacrificial mystery

Oct 29, 2014 by Carol Schlueter
Peruvian dig reveals sacrificial mystery
At an excavation site on the Peruvian coast, Tulane anthropology professor John Verano, right, and PhD student Brittany Dement examine the remains of a child who was sacrificed and buried 600 years ago. Credit: John Verano

Tulane University physical anthropologist John Verano has spent summers in Peru for the last 30 years, digging for ancient bones and solving their secrets. But his most recent work focuses on a unique archeological discovery: a ritual sacrifice of children and young llamas dating back 600 years.

"This is unusual, and not what we've seen before," Verano said, "especially on the coast of Peru."

In June he traveled to the Peruvian coastal village of Huanchaquito to assist with new excavations at the site where Gabriel Prieto, a Peruvian archeologist, in 2011 found the remains of 42 children who were sacrificed in a religious ceremony along with 76 llamas. The area was once part of the Chimú state, which dominated most of coastal Peru from about 1100 until 1470 A.D., when it was conquered by the Inca empire.

This year, Prieto and Verano expanded the dig and completed the study of children's remains excavated in 2011 with support from the National Geographic Society and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane.

Their latest excavation uncovered numerous additional sacrificial victims, which will allow for a more detailed reconstruction of this unusual event, Verano said. The researchers think that the sacrifice may have been an offering to the sea, or a response to severe flooding brought on by an El Niño event, and that the llamas may have been intended to transport the victims to the afterlife.

"It's not a place where you'd think to look," Verano said of the site, located on a sandy ridge 100 yards from the beach. With erosion and construction disturbing the site, the villagers in Huanchaquito "noticed these bones coming out of the sand."

Some of Verano's previous discoveries in Peru have revealed adults who were held captive and killed, "but usually not children," he said.

Multiple laboratories are analyzing bones and teeth discovered at the site. More details on the find and related studies will come later, Verano said. "What it means exactly, I'm not sure. But it is an exciting discovery."

http://phys.org/news/2014-10-peruvian-reveals-sacrificial-mystery.html

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 11:28:02 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War
The hilt is of a type that is associated with the eastern baltic region. Several such sword have been found in Finland and the Baltic states. The iron grip is particular for these swords. It is not unusual that these hilts are adorned with silver overlay with zoomorphic decoration in niello.

The blade likely originates in central europe: both form and inlayed letters suggest this.

As to dating, it belongs to the late viking period (late 10th or 11th century?). The sword was lost by its user several centuries before the reign of Ivan the Terrible. -If that blade could talk! We would surely listen to a tale that would be both fantastic and cruel.
-A wonderful find! I would love to learn more about it.
Peter Johnsson, Storvreta, Sweden
22/11/2014 19:32
11
2
The hilt is of a type that is associated with the eastern baltic region. Several such sword have been found in Finland and the Baltic states. The iron grip is particular for these swords. It is not unusual that these hilts are adorned with silver overlay with zoomorphic decoration in niello.
The blade likely originates in central europe: both form and inlayed letters suggest this.
-A wonderful find! I would love to learn more about it.
Peter Johnsson, Storvreta, Sweden
22/11/2014 16:05
5
0
Possibly from the Rus' culture which suffered so under the Golden Hoard in the 13th century.

e 13th century.
Myron Bergenske, Mineral Point, Wisconsin, USA
22/11/2014 03:30
4
0
Is the sword from the Rus' culture which suffered so under the Golden Hoard?
Myron Bergenske, Mineral Point, Wisconsin, USA
22/11/2014 03:18
1
0
Those knights were looking for the Holy Grial....probably they arrived to the lands of Tocharians, whites living in Western China as the Tarim Basin Mummies have proven.

Himler and Schafer failed for some miles: the cradle of Indo-European civilisation was not in Tibet but in Western Siberia.
Enrique, Spain
22/11/2014 02:44
3
0
a nice sword, seems to be quite old and, it would be nice to hear the history of this item.
john, finland
21/11/2014 22:42
4
0

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 11:26:50 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War
http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/f0013-could-rare-sword-have-belonged-to-ivan-the-terrible/

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 11:26:37 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War


'Every man in our expedition longed to take it and hold it his hands, it was an incredible piece of armament'. Pictures: The Siberian Times

Swords such as these were not typical in Russia or across Asia, and it was more similar to those widely used by European knights. After extensive research on ancient weapons, Vyacheslav Molodin prepared a report on his findings and concluded it was from Europe and dated to the late 12th or early 13th century.

Questions as to how the sword reached Russia from Sweden have been asked since 1976, with the first theory that it was carried during trade missions.

According to Arab historians, in the middle of the 12th century there was an ancient northern path through Russia to the River Ob, called the 'Zyryanskaya road' or 'Russky tes'. Over the centuries archaeologists have found a treasure trove of coins, silver vessels and medieval jewellery in the Urals and lower reaches of the Ob, having travelled from the west.

The downside to this theory is that the steppe, where the sword was found, is separated from the lower and middle Ob by hundreds of kilometres of rugged forests and swamps. Others have argued the weapon could easily have travelled east as a result of bartering, or as a spoil of war from skirmishes between the Turkic people of the steppe and the nomadic Urgic population of the Siberian taiga.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 11:26:20 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 11:25:56 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War


'It was incredibly well-preserved, yet I was scared to raise it from the ground'. Pictures: The Siberian Times

'It was close to lunch time when I was suddenly asked to come to that plot of land near the birch tree to 'check up some piece of iron', as they said. 'Most likely it would be a scythe', I thought to myself as I walked towards the site where they found it.

'Looking back, I see how it was a pure stroke of luck. Every man in our expedition longed to take it and hold it his hands, it was an incredible piece of armament'.

Mr Molodin told Science First Hand magazine: 'Carefully and slowly we cleaned the soil off, uncovering a strip of iron, which was wider at one end, and narrower at the other. It took us an hour to clear the soil completely to see a massive sword, about a metre long with a typical iron hilt of medieval knight's swords with a clearly expressed crossbar guard and tripartite pommel.

'It was incredibly well-preserved, yet I was scared to raise it from the ground. I was scared it would fall into pieces in my hands.

'Finally I put my thin bladed knife underneath the sword and raised it... You know, I've seen swords like this in museums and in scientific books, but it was my first time ever to hold it in my hands. It was as if it just descended from some knights' fairytale.

'I slowly twisted it, noting sparkles of silver on the guard and blade. It was so well preserved that you could in fact use it in the battle almost straight away. Others took to look at the find, too.

'Finally like a water through rushing through a dam, the shock of realising what we've just found broke through and we began talking all at the same time. I can't describe the feeling of surprise and excitement.

'How did it get here, in the heart of the Western Siberia, this clearly so European looking medieval sword? How did it preserve so well? Where did it come from? '

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 11:25:41 pm 
Started by Trojan War - Last post by Trojan War

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10
Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines