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News: THE SEARCH FOR ATLANTIS IN CUBA
A Report by Andrew Collins
http://www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/atlantiscuba.htm
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 03:29:57 am 
Started by pLANeT@LANTis - Last post by pLANeT@LANTis
    Quote: "but Plato gave it some embellishments."

     Yes! That is what I'm trying to say, and to what degree of embellishments? Just some embellishments or alot of embellishments or somewhere in between?

    The part about Solons' ashes being scattered about Salamis island is an interesting connection in word play. How closely does 'Salamis' sound like 'Atlantis' and Salamis happens to be the closest island to Athens near to the port of Piraeus!

    Therefore I propose and make a little conclusion based on this bit of word play and alliteration:

    #1.  Athens + Salamis = Atlantis

    #2.  Sais = Sa (lam) is

   

   

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 01:19:06 am 
Started by Lair of the White Worm - Last post by Lair of the White Worm
http://www.msstate.edu/web/media/detail.php?id=6985

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 01:18:54 am 
Started by Lair of the White Worm - Last post by Lair of the White Worm


Top: Jimmy Hardin, an associate professor in the Mississippi State University Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, co-directed a team in Israel that found archaeological evidence from the time of kings David and Solomon. In his MSU laboratory, Hardin examines an Egyptian figurine dating to the 10th or 11th century BC. (Photo by Megan Bean) Below: A Mississippi State University team found this bulla, or ancient clay seal, on a dig site in southern Israel last summer. It offers evidence of government activity in the 10th century B.C., a time when many scholars said a kingdom could not exist in the region. (Photo by University of Wisconsin/Nathaniel Greene)

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 01:18:12 am 
Started by Lair of the White Worm - Last post by Lair of the White Worm
 MSU department announces major archaeological find
Office of Public Affairs News Bureau (662) 325-3442 Contact: Bonnie Coblentz December 15, 2014   
Publication Quality Photo: Right click on the photo below, then select Save Target As or Save Link As. Selecting Save Picture As or Save Image As will save the low resolution image.
Top: Jimmy Hardin, an associate professor in the Mississippi State University Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, co-directed a team in Israel that found archaeological evidence from the time of kings David and Solomon. In his MSU laboratory, Hardin examines an Egyptian figurine dating to the 10th or 11th century BC. (Photo by Megan Bean) Below: A Mississippi State University team found this bulla, or ancient clay seal, on a dig site in southern Israel last summer. It offers evidence of government activity in the 10th century B.C., a time when many scholars said a kingdom could not exist in the region. (Photo by University of Wisconsin/Nathaniel Greene)

Top: Jimmy Hardin, an associate professor in the Mississippi State University Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, co-directed a team in Israel that found archaeological evidence from the time of kings David and Solomon. In his MSU laboratory, Hardin examines an Egyptian figurine dating to the 10th or 11th century BC. (Photo by Megan Bean) Below: A Mississippi State University team found this bulla, or ancient clay seal, on a dig site in southern Israel last summer. It offers evidence of government activity in the 10th century B.C., a time when many scholars said a kingdom could not exist in the region. (Photo by University of Wisconsin/Nathaniel Greene)

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Six official clay seals found by a Mississippi State University archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon.

Many modern scholars dismiss David and Solomon as mythological figures and believe no kingdom could have existed in the region at the time the Bible recounted their activities. The new finds provide evidence that some type of government activity was conducted there in that period.

Jimmy Hardin, associate professor in the MSU Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, said these clay bullae were used to seal official correspondence in much the same way wax seals were used on official documents in later periods.

Hardin, co-director of the Hesi Regional Project, has been excavating each summer at Khirbet Summeily, a site east of Gaza in southern Israel, since 2011. Hardin's findings were published in the December 2014 issue of Near Eastern Archaeology, a leading, peer-reviewed journal for this field.

"Our preliminary results indicated that this site is integrated into a political entity that is typified by elite activities, suggesting that a state was already being formed in the 10th century B.C.," Hardin said. "We are very positive that these bullae are associated with the Iron Age IIA, which we date to the 10th century B.C., and which lends general support to the historical veracity of David and Solomon as recorded in the Hebrew biblical texts.

"These appear to be the only known examples of bullae from the 10th century, making this discovery unique," he said.

The finds contribute significantly to an ongoing debate in the archaeological community about whether governments or states existed in the early Iron Ages. The artifacts hold far-reaching implications for the growing number of scholars who maintain that such political organization occurred much later than biblical texts suggest.

"Some text scholars and archaeologists have dismissed the historic reliability of the biblical text surrounding kings David and Solomon, such as recorded in the Bible in the books of Kings and Second Samuel, which scholars often date to the Iron Age IIA or 10th century B.C," Hardin said.

"The fact that these bullae came off of sealed written documents shows that this site -- located out on the periphery of pretty much everything -- is integrated at a level far beyond subsistence," he said. "You have either political or administrative activities going on at a level well beyond those typical of a rural farmstead."

The journal article describes the dig site as a borderland area between the heartlands of Judah and Philistia. It was originally assumed to be a small Iron Age farmstead. However, the excavation of the bullae and other recent archaeological finds indicate a level of political organization previously thought not to exist at that time.

"We believe that the aggregate material culture remains that have been discovered at Summeily demonstrate a level of political-economic activity that has not been suspected recently for the late Iron Age I and early Iron Age IIA," the journal article states. "This is especially the case if one integrates data from nearby Hesi [a much more extensively excavated site].

"It is our contention that, when taken together, these reflect a greater political complexity and integration across the transitional Iron I/IIA landscape than has been appreciated recently, as scholars have tended to dismiss trends toward political complexity (e.g., state formation) occurring prior to the arrival of the Assyrians in the region in the later eighth century b.c.e."

Two of the bullae Hardin's team excavated have complete seal impressions, two have partial seal impressions, and two others have none. Two bullae were blackened by fire. One bulla has a well-preserved hole where the string used to seal the document passed through the clay. The impressions in the bullae do not contain writing.

The dig site was chosen so researchers could study border dynamics between the nations of Philistia and Judea in the area previously dated to the 10th century B.C.

"We were trying to identify in the archaeological record the differences between Philistia and Judah," Hardin said. "Why is there a border in this area and only at this time? We're trying to learn what was the process by which these political entities were created. Within that larger question, you have a number of questions about whether the archaeological record matches the historical record from the texts, and if it disagrees, how do we reconcile the two."

The bullae the team found were in the layer of material tested by the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Rock Magnetism at the University of Minnesota. The markings were examined and dated by Christopher Rollston, an epigrapher in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at George Washington University.

Jeff Blakely of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is co-director of the Hesi Regional Project and has studied the region for 40 years. Blakely explained how the age of the bullae was determined.

"Our dates for the bullae are based on multiple types of evidence we combined to determine a general 10th century B.C. date," Blakely said. "The style of the bullae, the types of ancient pottery found in the same contexts as the bullae, the types of Egyptian scarabs found, the style of an Egyptian amulet, and the overall stratigraphy or layering of the site each suggested a 10th century date.

"In addition, archaeomagnetism dating, which is based on the strength and direction of the earth's magnetic fields in the past, also suggested the layers in which the bullae were found must be 10th century. Further research and analysis should refine our dating to decades rather than a century," he said.

From the start of the project, archaeologists have tried to determine what people were doing in the region of Khirbet Summeily, Blakely said.

"Generations of scholarship have suggested farming, but over the past few years, we have slowly realized that humans rarely farmed this region," he said. "It was a pasture. Shepherds tended sheep and goats under the protection of their government. Finding the bullae this past summer strongly supports our idea that Khirbet Summeily was a governmental installation."

MSU is Mississippi's flagship research university, available online at www.msstate.edu, facebook.com/msstate, instagram.com/msstate and twitter.com/msstate.

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 12:13:19 am 
Started by pLANeT@LANTis - Last post by Arcturus
The motive of both the Republic and TImaeus and Critias seems pretty much the same even if the works themselves are somewhat different. That motive seems to be a bit redundant, but then we are talking about a philosopher who perhaps wanted to make the same point. Opinion throughout history seems a bit divided, even in Plato's time.

Plutarch was not a contemporary of Plato, writing centuries afterwards, but he does seem to suggest that Solon actually did get the story and passed it down to Plato:

Quote
Now Solon, having begun the great work in verse, the history or fable of the Atlantic Island, which he had learned from the wise men in Sais, and thought convenient for the Athenians to know, abandoned it; not, as Plato says, by reason of want of time, but because of his age, and being discouraged at the greatness of the task; for that he had leisure enough, such verses testify, as-

"Each day grow older, and learn something new;" and again-

"But now the Powers, of Beauty, Song, and Wine,
Which are most men's delights, are also mine." Plato, willing to improve the story of the Atlantic Island, as if it were a fair estate that wanted an heir and came with some title to him, formed, indeed, stately entrances, noble enclosures, large courts, such as never yet introduced any story, fable, or poetic fiction; but, beginning it late, ended his life before his work; and the reader's regret for the unfinished part is the greater, as the satisfaction he takes in that which is complete is extraordinary. For as the city of Athens left only the temple of Jupiter Olympius unfinished, so Plato, amongst all his excellent works, left this only piece about the Atlantic Island imperfect. Solon lived after Pisistratus seized the government, as Heraclides Ponticus asserts, a long time; but Phanias the Eresian says not two full years; for Pisistratus began his tyranny when Comias was archon, and Phanias says Solon died under Hegestratus, who succeeded Comias. The story that his ashes were scattered about the island Salamis is too strange to be easily believed, or be thought anything but a mere fable; and yet it is given, amongst other good authors, by Aristotle, the philosopher.


THE END

http://classics.mit.edu/Plutarch/solon.html

So, I take from that the story was passed down from Sais, Egypt to Solon, but Plato gave it some embellishments.

 6 
 on: December 18, 2014, 02:12:00 am 
Started by pLANeT@LANTis - Last post by pLANeT@LANTis
    I'm not so sure I understand that The Republic can be compared to the Atlantis story in the same allegorical sense. The Republic reads somewhat like a handbook for the betterment of humankind by expressing the virtues of Beauty, Love and Harmony thru training from early childhood in the arts of music, gymnastics and mathematics. This training leads into early adulthood and assists the individual in making the right choices when selecting the ideal mate and producing genetically superior offspring conceived thru true love, rather than  ill conceived thru lust and promiscuity. This is not easy reading and requires some level of concentration for almost every page of these 400 plus pages.
    Whereas the Atlantis story is fairly easy reading and about 40 pages in all, reads more like a fairytale script for a Walt Disney movie.

 7 
 on: December 18, 2014, 01:08:59 am 
Started by Christi Ferrari - Last post by Christi Ferrari
China's 'Loch Ness Monster' Resurfaces
Reuters. July 15 2003
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20030715/od_nm/life_china_monster_dc_1

Local chinese official at Lake Tianchi reported seeing as
many as 20 mysterious and unidentified creatures swimming
in the Tianchi Lake in the Changbai Mountains in northeastern
JiLin Province China ( situated near North Korea ) on
the morning of July 11. Provincial Forestry
Bureau vice-directory Zhang LuFeng said that the
unidentified creatures reportedly appeared five times
inwhich the last time as many as 20 appear at once.
The strange animals appeared as only white or black
spots creating a wake in the water and were seen from
about two to three kilometer away. The creatures are
being compared to Scotland's Loch Ness Monster.
A 1903 local record suggest a the creature that
resembles a huge buffalo. Recent sighting suggest
a creature with big round eyes, protruding mouth,
a 1.5 meter long neck, and gray skin.

graphics
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/030715/161/4oq23.html

 8 
 on: December 18, 2014, 12:36:02 am 
Started by Karissa Oleyanin - Last post by Goddess of Love, Hate & Fury
Good for them!  A monument finally restored.

 9 
 on: December 18, 2014, 12:26:49 am 
Started by Karissa Oleyanin - Last post by Karissa Oleyanin
http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2025211284_petroglyphceremonyxml.html

 10 
 on: December 18, 2014, 12:26:12 am 
Started by Karissa Oleyanin - Last post by Karissa Oleyanin

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