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Genres of Film & Literature => Twin Peaks => Topic started by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:01:49 pm



Title: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:01:49 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ea/TwinPeaks_openingshotcredits.jpg)

Created by David Lynch & Mark Frost
Starring Kyle MacLachlan
Michael Ontkean
Mädchen Amick
Dana Ashbrook
Richard Beymer
Lara Flynn Boyle
Joan Chen
Sherilyn Fenn
Warren Frost
Piper Laurie
Sheryl Lee
Peggy Lipton
James Marshall
Everett McGill
Jack Nance
Kimmy Robertson
Ray Wise
Opening theme "Falling (Twin Peaks Theme)" by Angelo Badalamenti
Country of origin  United States
No. of episodes 30 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Mark Frost
David Lynch
Running time 0:48
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run April 8, 1990 – June 10, 1991


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:04:07 pm

(http://www.avclub.com/content/files/images/twin_peaks_3.article.jpg)
Twin Peaks is an American Emmy Award-nominated, Peabody- and Golden Globe-winning television serial drama created by David Lynch and Mark Frost, first broadcast on April 8, 1990 and last broadcast on June 10, 1991. Although created by Lynch and Frost, most of the 30 episodes are by different writers and directors. The show is set in the fictional town of Twin Peaks, Washington. The primary filming took place in Snoqualmie and North Bend, Washington.

The central plotline is the story of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) and his investigation of the murder of Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee), a popular local student and homecoming queen whose plastic-wrapped body is found on a river bank.

Twin Peaks was originally broadcast on ABC and, in its short first season, was one of the network's most successful television programs. In its longer second season, low viewer ratings led to cancellation. Despite this, it became a pop culture touchstone, and inspired a film prequel, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992). The series also later influenced several television series, including Northern Exposure; Picket Fences; Wild Palms; American Gothic; The X-Files; Carnivàle; Lost; Desperate Housewives; Wolf Lake; Eerie, Indiana; and Night and Day. Many of these were said to be "the next Twin Peaks" due to their examination of the human condition and the dark side of American suburban life.

Because of its success, in the mid-to-late 1990s, Bravo re-aired Twin Peaks in the U.S. from 2003-2004. Currently, NBC Universal's horror-themed cable channel Chiller, which launched on March 1, 2007, is airing the series. Twin Peaks was ranked on TV Guide' magazine's "Top 25 cult shows" at No. 20, and one of the "Top 50 Television Programs of All Time" by the same guide at No. 45.[1] In 2007, Channel 4 (UK) ranked Twin Peaks #9 on their list of the "50 Greatest TV Dramas".[2] Also that year, Time included the show on their list of the "100 Best TV Shows of All-Time".[3]



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:05:41 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/ff/Palmer_Autopsy.jpg)

Autopsy report of Laura Palmer.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:08:38 pm

(http://www.alanmooresenhordocaos.hpg.ig.com.br/germanTwinPeaksRedRoom2.JPG)

The series is set in 1989, with each episode — barring occasional exceptions — representing a single day in the chronology.

On the morning of February 24th, in the town of Twin Peaks, Washington state, lumberjack Pete Martell discovers a naked corpse tightly wrapped in a sheet of clear plastic on the bank of a river. Following the arrival of Sheriff Harry S. Truman, his deputies, and Dr. Will Hayward on the scene, the body is discovered to be that of homecoming queen Laura Palmer, the most popular girl at the local high school. The news spreads among the town's residents, particularly Laura's family and friends. Meanwhile, just across the state line, a second girl, Ronette Pulaski, is found walking along the railroad tracks in a fugue state. Since Ronette was discovered across the state line, FBI Agent Dale Cooper is called in to investigate. Cooper's initial examination of Laura's body reveals a tiny typed letter 'R' inserted under her fingernail. He recognizes this as the "calling card" of a killer who took the life of Teresa Banks a year earlier in a town located "in the southwest corner of the state" (revealed in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me to be Deer Meadow).

Cooper quickly establishes that Laura's character and relationships are not as they first appear, and that she's far from the wholesome homecoming queen that those closest to her believed her to be. It is revealed that Laura was two-timing her boyfriend Bobby Briggs with sullen biker James Hurley, a fact known to Laura's best friend Donna Hayward. Cooper also finds traces of **** in Laura's diary, indicating a drug habit she shared with Bobby. Meanwhile, Donna and James begin an investigation of their own into Laura's death, and find themselves embarking on a romantic relationship with each other.

Laura's cousin Maddy Ferguson arrives to stay with Laura's parents prior to the funeral. Maddy, who resembles Laura closely, befriends Donna and James and helps them in their efforts to find the killer — even impersonating Laura at one point to fool Laura's psychologist, Dr. Lawrence Jacoby.

During his investigation, Cooper stays at the Great Northern Hotel owned by the Horne family. The Hornes' sultry daughter Audrey develops a crush on Cooper that initially appears to be mutual. However, Cooper later rebuffs her advances, on the grounds that she is a high schooler, and that she is involved in the case he is working on. With Audrey's help, Cooper traces Laura's **** usage to a brothel called One-Eyed Jack's, which Audrey later infiltrates on Cooper's behalf. It is revealed that Laura had also been working as a prostitute there.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:10:20 pm
(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/audrey%20at%20one%20eyed%20jacks.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:12:15 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2a/Twinpeaks4.jpg)

Agent Cooper, The Man from Another Place, and Laura Palmer in the "red room" of Cooper's dream, later revealed to be part of the Black Lodge.

Cooper also experiences a bizarre dream, in which he sees a one-armed man called MIKE, who chants a strange poem: "Through the darkness of future past / The magician longs to see / One chants out between two worlds / Fire walk with me." MIKE tells Cooper about another man called BOB, and how they went "killing together". BOB also appears as a man with long, gray hair, dressed in denim, who swears to Cooper, "I will kill again." As the dream continues, MIKE shoots BOB. Cooper then finds himself twenty-five years later, sitting in a mysterious red-curtained room. It is here that he meets the diminutive Man from Another Place, who intones clues to Cooper in the form of strange phrases, and then proceeds to dance to a jazzy beat. Also present is the spirit of Laura Palmer, who kisses Cooper, and then whispers into his ear the name of her killer. When he awakens, Cooper is unable to recall the killer's name.

Cooper and the local police force are then able to track down Mike, whose full name is Phillip Michael Gerard. Gerard appears to be nothing more than a shoe salesman, and claims to know nothing of the BOB that Cooper describes. However, it eventually becomes clear that Gerard is possessed by an "inhabiting spirit" (the true "MIKE"), who reveals to Cooper and his colleages the true nature of BOB — BOB is a fellow inhabiting-spirit who has possessed someone in Twin Peaks "for over forty years".



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:13:37 pm

(http://images.quizilla.com/M/mattababy/1075690038_turesgiant.jpg)

Cooper is also visited by an apparition of a mysterious Giant, who provides him with further clues in the murder investigation. All of the information that Cooper has gained from psychic and empirical means, including the mysterious utterances of an eccentric local woman known as The Log Lady, leads him to a number of suspects; but when he discovers the existence of Laura's second, secret diary, he realizes that therein lies the key to solving the mystery. Harold Smith, a local man who was one of Laura's confidants, holds this diary. The secret diary reveals that from a very early age Laura was abused by a figure called "Bob", and that her use of drugs and sex are the means she has used to numb herself and escape from him.

On the night before she is to leave town, Maddy is brutally murdered by Laura's father, Leland, who is revealed as the man who is possessed by BOB. Cooper and Truman apprehend him, and as they interrogate the crazed Leland, it becomes clear that Leland has little to no memory of his grotesque actions while under BOB's influence. After confessing to two murders, BOB forces Leland to smash his own head against the wall of his cell. As Cooper and Truman rush to his side, Leland's memories of what he has done return to him, and in his dying moment, Leland claims to see Laura. However, as Cooper and the others note, if BOB has truly left Leland's body, it means his spirit is now loose in the woods of Twin Peaks. This is the end of the second season.

At the begining of Season 3, with the murder investigation concluded, Cooper is then all set to leave Twin Peaks when he is framed for drug trafficking by the criminal Jean Renault, and is temporarily suspended from the FBI. Renault holds Cooper responsible for the death of his brother Jacques, who was murdered by a grieving Leland Palmer when Jacques was under suspicion for Laura's murder.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:15:24 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/68/Kyle_MacLachlan_Twin_Peaks.jpg)

After Renault is killed in a shoot-out with police, and Cooper is cleared of the charges, his former FBI partner and mentor Windom Earle comes to Twin Peaks to play a deadly game of chess with Cooper, in which each piece of Cooper's that he takes means someone dies. As Cooper explains to Truman, during his early years with the FBI alongside Earle, Cooper had begun an affair with Earle's wife, Caroline, while she had been under his protection as a witness to a federal crime. Earle went mad and killed Caroline, tried to gut Cooper with a knife, and was subsequently committed to a mental institution. Now having escaped and come to Twin Peaks, Earle hides out in the woods so that he may go about plotting his revenge scheme.

As this is going on, Cooper continues to try to track down the origins and whereabouts of BOB, and learns more about the mysteries of the dark woods surrounding Twin Peaks. It is here he learns of the existence of the White Lodge and the Black Lodge, two mystical extra-dimensional realms whose gateways reside somewhere in the woods, and which are occupied by spirits that appear in Cooper's dreams and visions (metaphorically referred to as owls — "The owls are not what they seem"). Cooper also falls in love with a new girl in town, Annie Blackburn.

When Annie wins the Miss Twin Peaks contest, Windom Earle kidnaps her and takes her to the Black Lodge, which Cooper realizes has been Earle's goal all along. The Black Lodge then is revealed to be the place where BOB, the Little Man from Another Place, and the Giant come from, and where the red-curtained room of Cooper's dream is located. Cooper follows Earle into the Lodge, and has a set of bizarre encounters with doppelgangers of dead characters, including Caroline, Earle, and Laura and Leland Palmer.

During Cooper's journey, Windom Earle is apparently killed when his soul is consumed by an enraged BOB after Earle tries to claim Cooper's own soul in trade for Annie's life. Cooper then tries to escape, but cannot find the exit in the non-linear path of the Black Lodge. He is also chased by his own smiling doppelganger as he tries to find a way out. The Cooper doppelganger catches him, as BOB laughs. Cooper returns to the woods, with Annie by his side, both found unconscious on the ground by Truman. Some time later, Cooper awakens in his room at the Great Northern Hotel, and is tended to by Truman and Doc Hayward. He then requests to brush his teeth in his bathroom. Locking the door behind him, Cooper then smiles uncharacteristically as he pours toothpaste into the sink. He then slams his head into the mirror, and when Cooper's bloody face turns toward the camera, he laughs — we see his reflection is that of BOB. Apparently the Cooper doppelganger has exited the Black Lodge, thus taking the real Cooper's place. The series then ends on this cliffhanger.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:18:36 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f6/Palmer_Homecoming.jpg)

Sheryl Lee as Homecoming Queen Laura Palmer from TV's Twin Peaks.

The photo is Lee's real life prom photo, but was used frequently in the background of the series and as the image over a majority of the show's closing credits sequences.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:20:47 pm
(http://www.dvdactive.com/images/reviews/screenshot/2002/11/tp1.jpg)

Origins

A producer at Warner Brothers wanted Lynch to direct a film about the life of Marilyn Monroe, based on the book The Goddess. Lynch recalls in the Lynch on Lynch book that he was "sort of interested. I loved the idea of this woman in trouble, but I didn't know if I liked it being a real story."[4] Mark Frost was hired to write the screenplay. Even though this project was dropped by Warner Brothers, Lynch and Frost became good friends, and wrote a screenplay entitled One Saliva Bubble, with Steve Martin attached to star in it. However, this film was not made, either.

Lynch's agent, Tony Krantz, had been trying to get the filmmaker to work on TV since Blue Velvet, but he was never really that interested in the idea. "So one day Mark and I were talking at Du Pars, the coffee shop on the corner of Laurel Canyon and Ventura, and, all of a sudden, Mark and I had this image of a body washing up on the shore of a lake," Lynch remembered in an interview.[5]

Lynch and Frost pitched the idea to ABC in a ten-minute meeting with the network's drama head, Chad Hoffman, with nothing more than this image and a concept, according to the director: "The mystery of who killed Laura Palmer was the foreground, but this would recede slightly as you got to know the other people in the town and the problems they were having...The project was to mix a police investigation with a soap opera. We had drawn a map of the city. We knew where everything was located and that helped us determine the prevailing atmosphere and what might happen there."[5]

ABC liked the idea, and asked Lynch and Frost to write a screenplay for the pilot episode. Originally, the show was entitled Northwest Passage and set in North Dakota, but the fact that a town called Twin Peaks really existed (much like Lumberton in Blue Velvet) prompted a revision in the script. They filmed the pilot with an agreement with ABC that they would shoot an additional "ending" to it so that it could be sold directly to video in Europe as a feature if the TV show was not picked up. However, even though ABC's Bob Iger liked the pilot, he had a tough time persuading the rest of the network brass. Iger suggested showing it to a more diverse, younger group, who liked it, and the executive subsequently convinced ABC to buy seven episodes at $1 million apiece. Some executives figured that the show would never get on the air. However, Iger planned to schedule it for the spring. The final showdown occurred during a bi-coastal conference call between Iger and a room full of New York executives — Iger won, and Twin Peaks was on the air.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:22:48 pm
(http://www.ceskatelevize.cz/specialy/twinpeaks/foto/twin_peaks_17.jpg)


Twin Peaks features members of the loose ensemble of Lynch's favorite character actors, including Jack Nance, Kyle MacLachlan, Grace Zabriskie, and Everett McGill. Isabella Rossellini, who had worked with Lynch on Blue Velvet, was originally cast as Giovanna Packard, but she dropped out of the production before shooting began on the pilot episode. The character was then reconceived as Josie Packard, of Chinese ethnicity, and the role given to actress Joan Chen.[6]

It is also notable for the casting of several veteran actors who had long been absent from the screen, including 1950s movie stars Piper Laurie and Russ Tamblyn, and former Mod Squad star Peggy Lipton.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:25:05 pm

(http://heim.etherweave.com/weblog/archives/twinpeaks-thumb.jpg)


Improvisation

At several points during the filming, Lynch improvised by incorporating on-set accidents into the story. The most notable of these occurred when set decorator Frank Silva was accidentally filmed in a mirror during Sarah Palmer's vision at the end of the pilot. When David Lynch saw Silva's face, he liked it so much he kept it in the show, and cast Silva as "BOB", the mysterious tormentor of Laura Palmer.[7]

During the filming of the scene in which Cooper first examines Laura's body, a malfunctioning fluorescent light above the table flickered constantly, but Lynch decided not to replace it, since he liked the disconcerting effect that it created. Also, during the take, one of the minor actors misheard a line and, thinking he was being asked his name, he told Cooper his real name instead of saying his line, briefly throwing everyone off balance. Lynch was reportedly pleased with the lifelike, unscripted moment in dialog, and kept the "mistake" in the final cut:[8]

ATTENDANT: I have to apologize again for the fluorescent lights. I think it's a bad transformer.
COOPER (Kyle MacLachlan): That's quite all right.
TRUMAN (Michael Ontkean): Agent Cooper, we did scrape those nails when we brought her in.
COOPER: Here it is. There it is. Oh my God, here it is!
COOPER (to attendant): Would you leave us, please?
ATTENDANT: Jim.
COOPER: Uh...would you leave us alone, please?
ATTENDANT: Oh. Certainly.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:31:01 pm

(http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c181/Scabtree/TwinPeaks-TheBlackLodgeresized.jpg)

Composer Angelo Badalamenti, a frequent contributor to Lynch projects, scored the series and provides the leitmotif "Laura's Theme", the famous title theme, and other evocative pieces to the soundtrack. A handful of the motifs were borrowed from the Julee Cruise album Floating Into the Night, which was written in large part by Badalamenti and Lynch, and was released in 1989. This album also serves as the soundtrack to another Lynch project, "Industrial Symphony No. 1", a live Cruise performance also featuring Michael J. Anderson (the "Man from Another Place"). The song "Falling" (sans vocals) became the theme to the show, and the songs "Rockin' Back Inside My Heart", "The Nightingale", "The World Spins", and "Into the Night" (found in their full versions on the album) were all, except the latter, used as Cruise's roadhouse performances during the show's run. A second volume of the soundtrack was released on October 23, 2007 to coincide with the Definitive Gold Box DVD set.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:34:18 pm
(http://criticalmas.smugmug.com/photos/180847579-S.jpg)

The towns of Snoqualmie and North Bend, in Washington, which were the primary filming locations for stock Twin Peaks exterior footage (many exterior scenes were actually filmed in wooded areas of Malibu, California), are only about an hour's drive from the town of Roslyn. This town was the set of the series Northern Exposure, which debuted the same year, and also focused on the eccentric populace of a small northwestern town. A scene in the Northern Exposure first-season episode "The Russian Flu" was shot at Snoqualmie Falls, which was also featured in the opening titles sequence of Twin Peaks.

The background behind the actors of Invitation to Love is not a studio set, but the interior of the Ennis House, an architectural landmark of Frank Lloyd Wright in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:36:32 pm
(http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/tpgiant.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:38:37 pm
(http://www.shannacompton.com/SnoqualmieFalls2.jpg)

During the first and second season, it was the search for Laura Palmer's killer that served as the engine for the plot, and caught the public's imagination, although the creators admitted this was largely a macguffin— each episode was really about the interactions between the townsfolk. The unique (and often bizarre) personalities of each citizen formed a web of minutiae which ran contrary to the quaint appearance of the town. Adding to the surreal atmosphere was the recurrence of Dale Cooper's Lovecraftian dreams, in which the FBI agent is given clues to Laura's murder in a supernatural realm that may or may not be of his imagination.

The first season contained only eight episodes (including the two-hour pilot episode), and was considered technically and artistically revolutionary for television at the time, and geared toward reaching the standards of film. It has been said that Twin Peaks began the trend of accomplished cinematography now commonplace in today's television dramas. Lynch and Frost maintained tight control over the first season, handpicking all of the directors, with some that Lynch had known from his days at the American Film Institute (e.g., Caleb Deschanel and Tim Hunter) or referrals from those he knew personally. Lynch and Frost's control lessened in the second season, corresponding with what is generally regarded as a lessening of quality once the identity of Laura Palmer's murderer was revealed.

Its ambitious style, paranormal undertones, and engaging murder mystery made Twin Peaks a surprising hit. Its quirky characters, particularly Kyle MacLachlan's special agent Dale Cooper, were unorthodox for a supposed 'crime drama,' as was Cooper's method of interpreting his dreams to solve the crime.

Following the cliffhanger finale of the first season, the show's popularity reached its zenith, and "Peaksmania" seeped into mainstream popular culture (such as Saturday Night Live, in which Kyle MacLachlan hosted and performed a sketch that parodied the show). For the 1990 Emmy Awards, Twin Peaks led all series with eight nominations, although it failed to win one.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:42:49 pm
(http://www.shannacompton.com/DoubleRDiner.jpg)

With the resolution of the show's main drawing point (Laura Palmer's murder) in the middle of the second season, and with subsequent storylines becoming more obscure and drawn out, public interest finally began to wane, and "Peaksmania" seemed over. This discontent, coupled with ABC changing its timeslot over a number of occasions, led to a huge drop in ratings after being the most-watched television programming in the USA in 1990. On February 15, 1991, ABC announced that the show had been put on "indefinite hiatus", a move which usually leads to cancellation.[9]

This wasn't quite the end, though, as there was still a large enough fanbase for viewers to begin an organized letter-writing campaign, dubbed C.O.O.P (Citizens Opposed to the Offing of Peaks). The campaign was successful, and ABC agreed to another six episodes to finish the season.

In the final episodes, Agent Cooper was given a love interest, Annie Blackburn (Heather Graham), to replace the intended story arc with Audrey Horne. The series finale did not sufficiently boost interest, and the show was not renewed for a third season, leaving an unresolved cliffhanger ending that continues to be debated.

David Lynch himself returned to direct the finale of the series, annoying a few of the actors and writers, as they had previously felt "abandoned" by him. The writers, for their part, didn't appreciate his changes to their scripts.

In the featurette "A Slice of David Lynch", included with the 2007 "Gold Box Edition" DVD release of the complete series, Lynch expressed his regret at having resolved the Laura Palmer murder, stating he and Frost had never intended for the series to answer the question and that doing so "killed the goose that laid the golden eggs". Lynch directly blames network pressure for the decision to resolve the Palmer storyline prematurely.[10]

Later, David Lynch, having been long unhappy with ABC's "meddling" during the show's production, sold the whole show to Bravo for a small sum. Bravo began airing the show from scratch again, along with Lynch's addition of introductions to each episode by the Log Lady and her cryptic musings.

(http://z.about.com/d/walking/1/0/g/D/002confrisalish.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:45:04 pm
(http://ponchorama.com/images/twinpeaks.jpg)

FBI Special Agent Dale Bartholomew Cooper (sometimes called "Coop") was the lead fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks (1990-1991), created by Mark Frost and David Lynch. The character was played throughout both seasons by Kyle MacLachlan, who also briefly reprised the role for the prequel film Fire Walk With Me.

Cooper arrives in Twin Peaks to investigate the brutal murder of the popular high-school student, Laura Palmer, and falls in love with Twin Peaks and gains a great deal of acceptance within a tight knit community. He displays an array of quirky mannerisms such as giving a 'thumbs up' when satisfied, sage-like sayings, distinct sense of humour, along with his love for a good cherry pie and a "damn fine cup of coffee". One of his most popular habits is recording spoken-word tapes to a mysterious woman called 'Diane' into his dictaphone that he always carries with him, that often contain everyday observations and thoughts on his current case.

Cooper is a graduate of Haverford College. He is also revealed to be something of an introverted personality, due to his profound interest in the mystical, particularly in Tibet and Native American mythology. Much of his work is based on intuition and even dreams; this is in contrast to other fictional detectives who uses logic to solve their cases. Like many television detectives, however, he sometimes bends the rules or goes outside the law.

Cooper remains one of the most popular characters from a dramatic television series, and is cited as a favourite of television writer Joss Whedon [1].



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:46:59 pm
(http://www.dvdactive.com/images/reviews/screenshot/2002/11/tp2.jpg)

Prior to arrival in Twin Peaks

On joining the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Dale Cooper was based at the Bureau offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was here Cooper was partnered with the older Windom Earle, a veteran of the Bureau who taught the young Cooper everything he knew about the FBI. (Cooper later refers to his former partner as having a "brilliant" mind). At some point, Cooper would be based under the authority of FBI Bureau Chief Gordon Cole, who dealt with the mysterious 'Blue Rose' cases.

Some time after joining the Bureau, Earle's wife, Caroline was a witness to a federal crime. Earle and Cooper were assigned to protect her, and it was around this time that Cooper began an affair with Caroline, unbeknowst to his partner. However, one night, whilst in Pittsburgh, Cooper let his guard down - and Caroline was murdered by her husband by way of a knife wound to the aorta. Cooper's former partner and mentor had "lost his mind" (and may have indeed been the perpetrator of the federal crime Caroline witnessed), and was subsequently sent to a mental institution. Cooper was absolutely devastated by the loss of the woman he would later refer to as "the love of my life", and swore to never again get involved with someone who was a part of a case he was assigned to.

Three years before his arrival to Twin Peaks, Cooper has a dream involving the plight of the Tibetan people, and revealed to him the deductive technique of the Tibetan method. Deeply moved by what he saw in this dream, it is indicated it was this event that formed the basis of his unconventional methods of investigation.

In February 1988, Dale Cooper reveals to his boss, FBI Regional Bureau Chief Gordon Cole of the portents of a strange dream - whilst at the same time Agent Chester Desmond is investigating the bizarre murder of Theresa Banks in the town of Deer Meadow, north-east Washington. While conducting an experiement involving security camera monitors in the corridor outside his office, Cooper is shocked by the sudden bizarre appearance of Agent Phillip Jeffries in Cole's office - having vanished in the field two years before.

Hurrying towards Cole, and in front of Cooper and his colleague, Agent Albert Rosenfield, Jeffries starts raving in a loud and disturbed manner, referring at one stage to Cooper and yelling “Who do you think this is, there?”. Jeffries refers to names and incidents that are unfamiliar to those listening, before suddenly disappearing into thin air. Suddenly, the three receive a phone call telling of Agent Desmond's sudden disappearance in Deer Meadow.

Following up on this, and sensing a connection, Cooper retraces Desmond's steps through Deer Meadow - but is unable to discover the fate of his colleague or Theresa Banks' murderer. In a recording to Diane, Cooper refers to his deep conviction that the killer will strike again, "but as the old saying goes, who knows where or when?"

Roughly a year later, in 1989, Cooper tells Rosenfield in the Philadelphia offices of how he senses Banks' killer will strike again soon, and that his victim will be a young woman, who has blonde hair, is sexually active, using drugs, and is crying out for help. (And that Rosenfield will help him solve the case). Rosenfield is quick to dismiss Cooper's notion, however, reminding Cooper he is "talking about half the high school girls in America!"



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:49:58 pm
(http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/imgs/060705/163247__twin_l.jpg)

On February 24, 1989, Cooper is called into to investigate the murder of homecoming queen Laura Palmer in the town of Twin Peaks, in northeast Washington. (Following the potential second victim, Ronette Pulaski emerging across the state line). Cooper's initial examination of Laura's body reveals a tiny typed letter 'R' inserted under her fingernail. He recognizes this as the "calling card" of the killer who took the life of Teresa Banks in Deer Meadow.

Alongside Sheriff Harry S. Truman and his deputies, Cooper quickly establishes that Laura's character and relationships are not as they first appear, and that she's far from the wholesome homecoming queen that those closest to her believed her to be. It is revealed that Laura was two-timing her boyfriend Bobby Briggs with sullen biker James Hurley, a fact known to Laura's best friend Donna Hayward. Cooper also finds traces of **** in Laura's diary, indicating a drug habit she shared with Bobby.

During his investigation, Cooper stays at the Great Northern Hotel owned by the Horne family. The Hornes' sultry daughter Audrey develops a crush on Cooper that initially appears to be mutual. However, Cooper later rebuffs her advances, on the grounds that she is a high schooler and she is involved in the case he is working on. With Audrey's help, Cooper traces Laura's **** usage to One-Eyed Jack's, a brothel across the Canadian border. It is revealed that Laura had also been working as a prostitute there. Without his knowing, Audrey infiltrates the brothel and later has to be rescued by Cooper and Truman in an extralegal operation.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:51:57 pm

(http://twin-peaks.navajo.cz/twin-peaks-8.jpg)

Cooper also experiences a bizarre dream, in which he sees a one-armed man called Mike, who chants a strange poem: "Through the darkness of future past / The magician longs to see / One chants out between two worlds / Fire walk with me." Mike tells Cooper about another man called Bob, and how they went "killing together." Bob also appears as a man with long grey hair, dressed in denim, who swears to Cooper, "I will kill again." As the dream continues, Cooper finds himself twenty-five years older, sitting in a mysterious red-curtained room. It is here he meets the diminutive Man From Another Place who intones clues to Cooper in the form of strange phrases and then proceeds to dance to a jazzy beat. Also present is the spirit of Laura Palmer, who kisses Cooper and then whispers into his ear the name of her killer. When he awakes, Cooper is unable to recall the killer's name.

Cooper and the local police force are then able to track down the one-armed man, whose full name is Phillip Michael Gerard. Gerard appears to be nothing more than a shoe salesman and claims to know nothing of the Bob that Cooper describes. However, it eventually becomes clear that Gerard is possessed by the "inhabiting spirit Mike" who reveals to Cooper and his colleages the true nature of Bob - Bob is a fellow inhabiting spirit who has possessed someone in Twin Peaks "for over forty years."

Cooper is also visited by an apparition of a mysterious Giant who provides him with further clues in the murder investigation. All this information that Cooper has gained from psychic and empirical means, including the mysterious utterances of an eccentric local woman known as The Log Lady, leads him to a number of suspects; but when he discovers the existence of Laura's second, secret diary, he realizes that therein lies the key to solving the mystery. Harold Smith, a local man who was one of Laura's confidants, holds this diary. The secret diary reveals that from a very early age Laura was abused by a figure called 'Bob', and that her use of drugs and sex are the means she has used to numb herself and escape from him.

On the night before she is to leave town, Laura's lookalike cousin, Maddy Ferguson is brutally murdered by Laura's father, Leland, who is revealed as the man who is possessed by 'Bob'. Cooper and Truman apprehend him, and as they interrogate the crazed Leland, it becomes clear that Leland has little to no memory of his grotesque actions while under Bob's influence. After confessing the two murders, Bob forces Leland to smash his own head against the wall of his cell. As Cooper and Truman rush to his side, Leland's memories of what he has done return to him, and in his dying moment, Leland claims to see Laura. However, as Cooper and the others note, if Bob has truly left Leland's body, it means his spirit is now loose in the woods of Twin Peaks.

With the murder investigation concluded, Cooper is then all set to leave Twin Peaks when he is framed for drug trafficking by the Franco-Canadian criminal Jean Renault, who blames Cooper for the death of his brothers Jacques and Bernard, who both had been killed since Coooper's arrival. Cooper is temporarily suspended from the FBI.

After Renault is killed in a shoot-out with police and Cooper is cleared of the charges, his former FBI partner and mentor Windom Earle, who has escaped and come to Twin Peaks to play a deadly game of chess with Cooper, in which each piece of Cooper's that he takes means someone dies. Earle hides out in the woods so he may go about plotting his revenge scheme. Cooper explains to Truman his connection with Earle (see above).

As this is going on, Cooper continues to try to track down the origins and whereabouts of Bob, and learns more about the mysteries of the dark woods surrounding Twin Peaks. It is here he learns of the existence of the White Lodge and the Black Lodge, two mystical extradimensional realms whose gateways reside somewhere in the woods and which are occupied by spirits, that appear in Cooper's dreams and visions (metaphorically referred to as owls - "The owls are not what they seem"). Cooper also falls in love with a new girl in town, Annie Blackburn.

When Annie wins the Miss Twin Peaks contest, Windom Earle kidnaps her and takes her to the Black Lodge, which Cooper realises has been Earle's goal all along. The Black Lodge then is revealed to be the place where Bob, the Man From Another Place and the Giant come from, and where the red-curtained room of Cooper's dream is located. Cooper follows Earle into the Lodge and has a set of bizarre encounters with doppelgangers of dead characters, including Caroline Earle and Leland Palmer. During Cooper's journey, Windom Earle is 'killed' by an enraged Bob, but Annie's fate is unclear. Cooper then tries to escape, but cannot find the exit in the nonlinear path of the Black Lodge. He is also chased by his own smiling doppelganger as he tries to find a way out. The doppelganger catches him, and both Cooper and Annie return to the woods, unconscious. He awakens in his room at the Great Northern Hotel and says "I wasn't sleeping", in an ominous tone of voice. In the final shot of the television series, Cooper slams his forehead into the bathroom mirror, and his reflection is that of 'Bob'.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:54:49 pm
(http://www.tiszanet.hu/beryl/images/TheWaitingRoom.jpg)

The feature film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me subtly expands on the events of Cooper's fate in the series finale, while at the same time functioning as a prequel that details the last week of Laura Palmer's life.

At one point while experiencing a strange dream involving the Black Lodge and its residents, in the non-linear realm Laura encounters Cooper at a point after he has become trapped there. Cooper implores her not to take "the ring", a mysterious object that gives it's wearer a sort of connection to the Black Lodge. Shortly thereafter, Laura also has a vision of a bloody Annie Blackburn beside her in her bed, who tells her: "My name is Annie. I've been with Laura and Dale. The good Dale is in the Lodge, and he can't leave. Write it in your diary." It is unknown if Laura did in fact transcribe this to the diary in her possession at the time. (Though, it has been said had the series continued in some fashion, this plot would have followed up on).

At the film's conclusion, Laura's spirit sits in the Red Room, and is looking up at Cooper whose hand is resting on her shoulder, and is smiling at her. Shortly thereafter, Laura's angel appears before them both and the film ends. The meaning behind Cooper's prescence alongside Laura, and indeed, his ultimate fate - if he ever escaped the Black Lodge - is unknown.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:56:51 pm
(http://www.glastonberrygrove.net/info/books/coopbio.gif)

In 1990, Simon & Schuster Audio released a cassette entitled Diane ... The Twin Peaks Tapes of Agent Cooper which compiled many of the recorded diary entries of Cooper that had been featured in the first season and the beginning of the second, along with specially-recorded entries including several taking place prior to the pilot episode. The tape goes up to the aftermath of Cooper's shooting at the start of the second season.[1]

Published by Pocket Books in 1991, the official tie-in book The Autobiography of F.B.I. Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes by Scott Frost (writer) (the brother of Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost) features a collection of transcripts from Cooper's audio tapes, from his early childhood to the day he is assigned to Laura Palmer's murder. It reveals that Cooper was born on April 19, 1954, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and details his first stumbles with love, obsession with the FBI and the relationships between himself, his parents, Windom Earle and Earle's wife, Caroline. Many of these tape transcripts are dictated to "Diane", though a later tape states that Cooper enjoys the thought of Diane listening to his tapes so much that he will address all tapes to her, whether she will ever listen to them or not. It also reveals how Cooper investigated the murder of Teresa Banks in the town of Deer Meadow - a fact that could not be reconciled following the release of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me a year later.

Like all Twin Peaks spin-off media, the canonicity of these two products in relation to the television series is unclear, although the Diane... cassette did incorporate canoncial elements of the television series.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 10:58:30 pm
(http://pics.livejournal.com/motepolitiet/pic/0000k3t0/s320x240)

Much like how he relates to the town itself, Cooper gains an instant rapport with much of the townspeople on arrival to Twin Peaks - most particularly Sheriff Harry S. Truman and his deputies, Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill and Deputy Andy Brennan. While Truman is initially skeptical of Cooper's unconventional investigation methods and other-worldly ideas, he is most often willing to accept Cooper's judgement. (Even referring to Cooper as "the finest lawman I have ever known" to agents investigating Cooper's alleged drug-running to Canada). Overtime there emerges a strong bond between the two, and a fierce loyalty to one another, most notably when Truman assists Cooper in rescuing Audrey Horne from One-Eyed Jacks, Cooper becoming a deputy following his suspension from the Bureau, and then Truman waiting patiently for two days at Glastonberry Grove for Cooper to emerge from the Black Lodge in the series finale.

Cooper's strongest relationship outside of the townspeople is that of his friendship with his colleague, Agent Albert Rosenfield. Though he has strong respect and admiration for Rosenfield's medical skills, and is seemingly unintimidated by Rosenfield's sarcastic manner, he has little tolerance or patience for Rosenfield's treatment of the town's citizens - most particuarly his animosity towards Sheriff Truman. (Which notably thaws over time).



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:02:47 pm
(http://dyskenzo.pop.e-wro.pl/tp/postacie/dale.jpg)

Prior to Twin Peaks, Cooper's strongest romantic relationship was his affair with Caroline Earle, the wife of his former partner, Windom Earle. Caroline had been under Cooper and Earle's protection for witnessing a federal crime that Earle committed when he lost his mind, but on one night when Cooper's guard was down, Caroline was murdered by Windom. He tried to kill Cooper for having an affair with her but barely survived. Caroline's death and his failure to protect her continues to haunt Cooper on his arrival to Twin Peaks, referring to a "broken heart" when discussing women with Truman and his deputies. He also relates the story of Caroline to the teenage Audrey Horne.

On arrival to Twin Peaks, Cooper becomes quickly aware that 18 year-old Audrey Horne, the daughter of local businessman Benjamin Horne, harbours a crush on him. The attraction initially appears mutual, as Cooper is clearly drawn to Audrey - but he is quick to rebuff her advances when Audrey turns up in his hotel bed. Cooper explains she is part of a case he is working on and too young, but that he does genuinely want to be her friend. However, following her disappearance (orchestrated by Jacques Renault), Cooper privately confesses to Diane that in Audrey's absence all he can think of is her smile. Following her rescue, there remains a deeply affectionate - almost close - friendship with the two, most notably when Audrey arrives to his hotel room for comfort following her father's arrest and her sad farewell when she believes Cooper is leaving Twin Peaks for good. They also slow-dance at the Milford wedding.

However, during the production of the series' second season, Kyle MacLachlan (as he notes during an interview on the 2007 Gold Edition Twin Peaks DVD set) vetoed the possibility of a romantic relationship, as he felt his character should not sleep with a high school girl. It is also alleged this was due to pressure from his co-star and then-girlfriend, Lara Flynn Boyle. [citation needed] Following the series' cancellation, it is often said by the show's writers that the Cooper-Audrey relationship was to be the main plot following the resolution of the Laura Palmer murder mystery - and forcing them to focus more on the supporting characters. [citation needed]

Following his reinstatement to the FBI, Cooper meets Annie Blackburn, the sister of Norma Jennings, whom he instantly falls in love with. Annie is established as being a kindred spirit to Cooper, experiencing the world with curiosity and wonder. Much like how Cooper is recalling his pain over Caroline Earle, Annie is also nursing a broken heart from someone in her past. (Which is implied may have resulted in suicide attempts, and affected her decision to later attend a monastery). Cooper helps her to prepare for participation in the Miss Twin Peaks contest. However, she is taken to the Black Lodge by Windom Earle to use her 'fear' to open the gateway, (and most likely became of relationship to Cooper).



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:05:37 pm
(http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p197/jinellem/180px-Dale-cooper.jpg)

*Special Agent Dale Cooper grew up in Philadelphia (according to Season 2, Episode 18, as well as a book, The Autobiography of F.B.I. Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes, written by Scott Frost, the brother of the series' producer Mark Frost, providing background information about Cooper). On arriving in Twin Peaks, Cooper quotes W.C. Fields, saying 'I'd rather be here than Philadelphia'. This is no coincidence, since this is where David Lynch lived in the Eraserhead era. Lynch has claimed many times that Philadelphia has had a strong influence on his worldview.

*Kyle MacLachlan apparently could not stand cherry pie, unlike his character. As MacLachlan said in an interview: "I hate cherry pie! Always have, always will!"

*The name of Dale Cooper might have been inspired by the mysterious "D.B. Cooper" who, in 1971, hijacked an airliner leaving Seattle and jumped from the plane with $200,000 dollars strapped to his chest, never to be seen again.

*In a Sesame Street "Monsterpiece Theater" skit, the Cookie Monster played a Dale Cooper-esque character investigating how the town of Twin Beaks got its name, unable to connect this to the fact that all the town's inhabitants (including "David Finch") are birds with two beaks.

*In The Simpsons episode "Who Shot Mr. Burns? Part Two" (2F20, 17 September 1995), Chief Wiggum has a dream that resembles Dale Cooper's dream in which Lisa talks backwards to reveal clues. The chief awakens from his dream with his hair mussed like Cooper's bed hair after his awakening. In the episode "Lisa's Sax" (3G02, 19 October 1997), a flashback to 1990 shows Homer watching the show as Dale Cooper remarks, "That's some damn fine coffee you got here in Twin Peaks... and damn good cherry pie." The Giant is then shown waltzing with a horse, under a tree with a traffic light hanging from a branch. Homer's opinion of the show is "Brilliant!... I have absolutely no idea what's going on."


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:08:31 pm
(http://www.cenedra.com/twinpeaks/chara/dale.jpg)

Character: FBI Agent Dale Cooper
Profession: FBI Special Agent
Birthdate: April 19, 1954
Remarks: Otherwise known as 'Coop'. Very partial to dougnuts and strong, black coffee by which any hotel, particularly The Great Northern, can be judged. Intrigued by Tibet and Annie Blackburn.

   
Actor: Kyle MacLachlan 
Birthdate: February 22, 1959
Location: Yakima, Washington, USA


http://www.cenedra.com/coop.htm


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:12:12 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/dc/Ontkean.jpg)

Harry S. Truman


Sheriff Harry S. Truman is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, played by actor Michael Ontkean. He assists Special Agent Dale Cooper in the investigation of the murder of Laura Palmer. Series creator David Lynch has stated that the character was not named for American president Harry S. Truman, but rather for Washington state resident Harry Truman who died in the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Yet the fictional Harry's middle initial is 'S' (as demonstrated in dialogue and by the sign on his office door visible in several episodes) whereas the volcano victim Truman's middle initial was 'R'.

Harry is in love with fragile Josie Packard, and he is one of the Bookhouse Boys.

Harry gets on well with Cooper. They hit it off almost from the start. Harry is very down-to-earth in contrast with Cooper's unconventional methods of policing, fascination with Tibet, dreams, etc. Harry regards Cooper as somewhat eccentric but well-meaning. In early episodes, Harry serves to introduce Cooper (and hence the viewer) to the more prominent residents of Twin Peaks. Harry begins to feel that he is the Dr Watson to Cooper's Sherlock Holmes. Despite their differences, Truman represents a literary alternate to Cooper: they approach the same goal through different means.

As the case progress, Harry's respect for Cooper grows. He regards Coop as "the finest lawman he has ever known".



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:32:09 pm
(http://www.ed-wood.net/laura_palmer_3.JPG)

Laura Palmer

Laura Palmer is a fictional character played by Sheryl Lee on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks. Her death was the catalyst for the events of the series.

 
Laura was her town's favorite daughter; she volunteered at Meals on Wheels, was the high school Homecoming queen, and was (apparently) the darling of her parents, Sarah and Leland. However, Laura led a double life — she was a **** user, a victim of child abuse and had briefly worked at One Eyed Jacks, a casino/brothel just north of the Canadian border.

The discovery of Laura's body in the pilot episode of Twin Peaks brought Special Agent Dale Cooper to town and the investigation of her death, and the effects it had on those around her, propelled the first season and the first 15 episodes of the second season. Laura remained prominent afterward, as her death had exposed many secrets related to her, and also — in some cases — unrelated, such as the Packard mill conspiracy.

Laura's diary was uncovered in the first episode, but her secret diary was not recovered until later, and it contained passages suggesting that she had long been the victim — sometimes willingly — of abuse from a malevolent entity named BOB, who wanted to be close to her, or even be her.

During the second season, the identity of her murderer was revealed: her father, Leland, who had been possessed by BOB and made to molest, ****, and kill his own daughter. When Leland dies in prison, it is implied that Laura appears before him in a vision, forgiving him and welcoming him to the afterlife.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:34:20 pm
(http://www.ceskatelevize.cz/specialy/twinpeaks/foto/twin_peaks_1.jpg)


•   Sheryl Lee also played Laura's cousin, Maddy Ferguson, who arrived in town in the third episode for Laura's funeral. At one point Maddy poses as dead Laura to lure Dr. Jacoby.
•   One of the best-known musical pieces from the show was the leitmotif Laura's Theme, composed by Angelo Badalamenti. This was sampled in the Top Ten hit Go by Moby.
•   Jennifer Lynch wrote an official series tie-in, The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, which was sold from 1990 and was the diary used in the series.
•   Swallow the Sun, a doom metal band, wrote a song called "The Ghost of Laura Palmer", probably derived from the character.
•   Terminaator, a rock band from Estonia, has a song called "Veel on aega". There is a reference to Laura and Twin Peaks in lines "Laura Palmer mõrvati | Väikelinn kuid elab edasi", which means "Laura Palmer was murdered | But a small town lives on".
•   Laura's iconic Homecoming portrait (shown above) was originally Sheryl Lee's prom photo in real life. Several versions of it exist and are used throughout the series and follow-up/prequel Fire Walk With Me.
•   Amanda Palmer's solo debut album is entitled "Who Killed Amanda Palmer", which is a reference to Laura Palmer's death and the investigation thereof.
•   The band Fantômas covered the theme song for the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me on their Directors Cut album.
•   During the evacuation of Saigon, April, 1975, Hunter S. Thompson left the Global Affairs Suite in the hands of a Laura Palmer. See Thompson's "Fear and Loathing in America," c. 2000.
•   The Band Skycamefalling has a song entitled Laura Palmer on their album 10.21.
•   The band Kick Asteroid recorded a single entitled "She's Full Of Secrets" in obvious homage to the character and the series as a whole.
•   A song called Our Energy by the artist Cyberstorm features lyrics referring to Laura Palmer. It can be found on John 00 Fleming's 2000 DJ mix album For Your Ears Only in the form of a Plastic Angel remix. The lyrics, spoken in a German or Dutch accent, are as follows: There is a secret diary on which Laura used to write whatever happened to her. The killer's initials are on it. People still don't know who killed Laura Palmer but I know who did. I know the murderer. I happen to know a secret. Everyone lives in fear. I know the murderer.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:36:55 pm
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp14.jpg)

Laura Palmer

Nickname: "Blue Eyes"
Birth date: 7/22/72
Sign: Cancer
Likes: Potato pancakes with creamed corn topping
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Sheryl Lee

Accomplishments:
For my twelfth dirthday, I got a pony, who I named Troy. I took riding lessons every Saturday for two years. Everyone was so proud of me when I won a Blue Ribbon at the National Riding and Jumping Derby. I was crowned Twin Peaks High School Prom Queen.

Strengths:
I love to try new things - especially outdoor activities. James was teaching me to ride a motorcycle. I'm really getting to be pretty good at racing around curves.

Weaknesses:
I'm so afraid of BOB..


http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcard14.html


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:41:14 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/64/Leland.gif)

Leland Palmer is a fictional character played by Ray Wise on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks, and in the prequel feature filmTwin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.

Leland and his family (wife Sarah and daughter Laura) have always been well-known figures in the town of Twin Peaks; they seem to be the perfect family. When Laura is murdered, Leland’s psychological foundations begin to crumble. After her arrival, Madeleine Ferguson, Laura’s cousin (and spitting image), is of great help to him in learning how to deal with his daughter’s death.

It is eventually revealed that, as a boy, Leland met a strange neighbour who turned out to be a demonic entity named BOB, who would possess him throughout his life. As an adult, he molests and rapes Laura throughout her teens, all the while controlled by BOB. As time wears on, the strain of his dual personality starts to have a noticeable effect on his appearance; Leland's hair turns completely white.

Leland is eventually exposed as the murderer of both his daughter and his niece, and arrested by FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper and Sheriff Harry Truman. He dies in custody following his bizarre interrogation on the night of his arrest. BOB takes control of Leland and forces him to ram his own head into the wall. At the moment of his death, Leland remembers the crimes he committed under BOB's control. He sees a vision of his daughter Laura as he dies. As Cooper explains to the widowed Sarah in the following episode, it was probably Laura forgiving him and welcoming him into the afterlife.

In the final episode of the series, Cooper encounters a grinning doppelganger of Leland in the Black Lodge, who says “I did not kill anybody.” At the episode's conclusion, it is implied that in an ironic twist, Cooper himself has now become a new host for BOB.






Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:45:34 pm
(http://images.quizilla.com/M/mattababy/1075689918_uresalbert.jpg)

Albert Rosenfield is a fictional character in the cult television series Twin Peaks, portrayed by veteran actor Miguel Ferrer. Rosenfield is an FBI Agent and forensics expert brought in to apply his extraordinary forensic skills to the case of Laura Palmer's murder, and the linked murders and violent events.

Albert quickly made fans among viewers, if not townspeople, with his extremely sarcastic and wittily abrasive manner.

Rosenfield alienated the Twin Peaks sheriff's department relatively quickly, mocking Andy, and enraging Sheriff Harry S. Truman to the point where Truman lost his temper and punched Rosenfield. He also rowed with Doc Hayward, and was very disparaging about the capabilities of the local police and medical facilities in Twin Peaks generally, showing respect only to his FBI colleagues.

A later appearance, and another conflict with Sheriff Truman, led to an emotional moment where Rosenfield exposed a sensitive and peace-loving side, seemingly at odds with his acerbic surface persona and to the complete shock of the sheriff and viewers alike. Such complex, contradictory characters were typical of Twin Peaks and the works of David Lynch in general.

"While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a naysayer and a hatchetman in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and will gladly take another because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject, absolutely, revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method, is love. I love you Sheriff Truman"

(http://www.markeverclear.com/twinpeaks/images/thumb/1/10/AlbertRosenfield.jpg/300px-AlbertRosenfield.jpg)




Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:48:26 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0b/AudreyHorne.jpg)

Audrey Horne is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Sherilyn Fenn. She is a femme fatale character.

Born August 24, 1972, Audrey fits the image of a poor little rich girl. She is able to get anything she wants except for her father's love. Benjamin Horne, the town's business magnate, gave that love to deceased Laura Palmer, both physically and emotionally. Audrey is labelled a troublemaker and lives up to that expectation.

Angelo Badalamenti composed the leitmotif Audrey's Dance for the character.

In a memorable scene in the Twin Peaks pilot, Audrey blew her father's business deal worth millions by interrupting a meeting of Norwegian investors and telling them about Laura's murder. Audrey appears emotionally upset although she and Laura were not friends. She says she "kind of loved Laura" because she taught and looked after her mentally retarded brother Johnny.

In later episodes, she develops a crush on Special Agent Dale Cooper and helps him investigate Laura's murder by infiltrating the brothel One-Eyed Jack's.

In the show's second season, writers planned a serious relationship between Cooper and Horne, but Kyle MacLachlan, who played Cooper, vetoed it, arguing that Cooper would not become involved with a high school-age woman.  Audrey was paired with other characters such as Bobby Briggs and John Justice Wheeler.

In the final episode, Audrey is engaged in an act of civil disobedience at the bank where a bomb trap goes off near Audrey, Andrew Packard, Pete Martell and the banker. The bomb, being an ironic "reward" of a long treasure hunt, was planted by the late Thomas Eckhardt. Sherilyn Fenn stated in an interactive chat on America Online that had there been a third season of the show, her character was slated to have survived the explosion.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:49:43 pm
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp47.jpg)

Audrey Horne

Nickname: "Princess"
Birth date: 8/15/72
Sign: Leo
Likes: Saddle shoes, wool sweaters, and skirts
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Sherilyn Fenn

Accomplishments:
I am the president of the Twin Peaks High School French Club and was voted "Best Dressed" in the senior class.

Strengths:
I believe I am extremely inquisitive and adventurous and have a great deal of personal charm. Of course, my neat little trick with a cherry stem adds to my desirability and mysteriousness.

Weaknesses:
Some people say I am spoiled, moody, and naive - they are just jealous.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 11, 2007, 11:55:50 pm
(http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Corridor/7732/ben.gif)

Ben Horne

Benjamin Horne (played by Richard Beymer) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 prime-time ABC series Twin Peaks. A fervent capitalist, his business schemes lead Twin Peaks to a number of potential disasters. He is the father of Audrey, whom he tends to leave to her own devices, and Johnny who is severely mentally handicapped. He has a very close relationship with his brother Jerry. He is married to Sylvia, who is not featured in the series very much.

As well as running the hotel, and the local department store, Horne also runs a brothel called “One Eyed Jacks,” that is a major location for several plot-lines throughout the series.

As the series begins, Ben is seen to be cold-blooded, ruthless, and criminal. While having an affair with Catherine Packard Martell, owner of the Packard Mill, he is plotting with Catherine’s sister in law Josie Packard, but he is manipulating both of them as part of his plan to obtain the Packard Mill, and Ghostwood, the land on which it stands. Ben, Hank Jennings, and Josie all seem to have been involved in the death of Catherine’s brother Andrew (Josie’s husband, and the original owner of the mill). In addition to playing Catherine and Josie against each other, Ben is also involved in criminal enterprises with Leo Johnson, Hank Jennings, the Renault brothers, and Black Rose. Ultimately, Ben orders Leo Johnson to burn down the mill, orders Hank Jennings to ensure Catharine will be killed in the fire, and finally orders Hank to kill Leo.

Though the mill burns, it is not entirely destroyed. Catherine disappears, but no body is found, and Leo is put into a coma, but does not die. Ben’s plans are complicated by Catharine’s not signing her insurance policy, and by his being arrested for Laura Palmer’s murder.

Things soon to begin to unravel for Ben as the second season progresses. Following Audrey’s abduction by Jean Renault, Ben was forced to deal with the knowledge his daughter was aware of his more illegal business practices. Though never suspected of the many crimes he was responsible for, he was arrested for the one crime he did not commit, and as a result, his plans for the Ghostwood development fell through. Traumatized by this string of misfortunes, Ben suffered a severe nervous breakdown. As a result, he comes to believes he is fighting the American Civil War in which the South emerges victorious, a delusion that takes the combined efforts of Dr. Lawrence Jacoby, Audrey, his brother Jerry, and Bobby Briggs for him to ultimately snap out of. Following this, he becomes an environmentalist (that is implied at being a front for ruining Catherine Martell’s plans for the Ghostwood project), but overall he does appear to making a genuine effort to “be good.”

As the series draws to a close, Ben suggests to Donna Hayward that he might in fact be her biological father, a suspicion that had been slowly growing in Donna’s mind. This immediately draws him into conflict with Doc Hayward, and Donna’s mother, Eileen Hayward. Both men come to blows in the Hayward family home in the last episode, with Ben suffering a severe blow to the head on a fireplace as a result of the violent confrontation. The full extent of this injury, and even if it was indeed fatal, is unclear.

The surname 'Horne' implies a reference to the act of cuckoldry, as in William Wycherley's play The Country Wife, in which a character named Harry Horner sleeps with married women. The horns have a symbolic reference to old European rituals in which a cuckolded husband would be mocked by a crowd wearing horns.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:00:54 am
(http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t226/seriejunkies/Screencaps/twinpeaks_donnahearsthenews.jpg)

Donna Hayward

Donna Hayward is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Lara Flynn Boyle. Donna was portrayed by Moira Kelly in the movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.

Donna was the best friend of Laura Palmer, and after her death she was obsessed with finding out who killed her and why, with the help of James Hurley, Laura's secret boyfriend and Donna's new love interest, and Madeleine Ferguson, the look-a-like cousin of Laura.

Donna's father is the town doctor, known simply as Doc Hayward, and her mother is Eileen Hayward, who sits in a wheelchair and tends to the house. Donna has two sisters, Harriet and Gersten, who are seen in the series only a couple of times.

At the end of season two, it is strongly suggested that Doc Hayward might not be Donna's biological father after all, and that she is in fact be the daughter of Benjamin Horne and half-sister to Audrey Horne. However, due to the series' cancellation, this theory has not been elaborated upon. In the penultimate episode, Doc Hayward attacks Benjamin and apparently kills him.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:02:47 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp20.jpg)

Donna Hayward

Birth date: 9/2/72
Sign: Virgo
Likes: James
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Lara Flynn Boyle

Accomplishments:
I qualified for the Twin Peaks High School Honor Roll in each of my four years. I was also voted "Most Likely to Succeed" in my senior class. It's very flattering to have received that vote of confidence from my peers. Now, I only hope that I can live up to my full potential.

Strengths:
I've always been adventurous - but careful. I guess being a doctor's daughter has taught me this instinct. When James, Maddy, and I took Laura's investigation into our own hands, that was definitely living life on the edge.

Weaknesses:
My undying friendship to Laura has caused my great pain and sorrow. I know that I'll never get over her death. I miss her so much.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:05:19 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/28/James_Marshall.jpg)

James Hurley

James Hurley (played by James Marshall) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He is the nephew of Big Ed and Nadine Hurley, and lives with them, due to his parents' problems. He frequently has problems with women, and is a keen motorcycle rider.

His major enemy is Bobby Briggs.

James was Laura Palmer's secret boyfriend. She went off with him secretly the night she died, and she gave him half of her heart necklace. After Laura dies, he falls in love with Donna Hayward. Donna and James bury the half necklace out in the forest to try and allay suspicion from him. He is only quiet on the outside.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:10:47 am
(http://www.nndb.com/people/003/000029913/everettmcgill03.jpg)

Big Ed Hurley

Big Ed Hurley (played by Everett McGill) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He runs the local gas station, aka "Big Ed's Gas Farm" and is an "unofficial" deputy.

He is married to Nadine, with whom he is clearly troubled. He looks after James Hurley, his nephew.

He is secretly seeing Norma Jennings, with whom he had been in love since high school.

He is also one of the Bookhouse Boys.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:16:39 am
(http://myspace-707.vo.llnwd.net/00406/70/79/406079707_l.jpg)

On the set of Twin Peaks:  Fire Walk with Me


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:19:32 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/ew1990n.jpg)

Entertainment Weekly April 6, 1990
Television: Twin Peaks

THE ARRIVAL OF DAVID LYNCH'S Twin Peaks, the most eagerly anticipated series of the season, threatens to make everything else on television this week seem irrelevant; why, not even Melissa Gilbert as a supporter of Chinese revolution in Tuesday's Forbidden Nights can top the surpassing oddness of Lynch's creation.

Twin Peaks
(ABC, Sun., April 8, 9-11 p.m.)

DIRECTOR DAVID Lynch says, "The thing is about secrets." The "thing" is Twin Peaks, the wingdingiest thing to make it onto network television in many a full moon. In an already overquoted quote about his ominous, enthralling new prime-time soap opera, Lynch has called Twin Peaks "Peyton Place meets Blue Velvet." It's that and more: It's Mayberry R.F.D. Goes Psycho; Pee-wee's Playhouse Has a Nervous Breakdown; and the first you-really-can't-miss-this show of the '90s.

At the start of Twin Peaks, the body of a young woman, wrapped in plastic, washes ashore in a small Northwestern mill village. The girl's blue-veined, death-frosted skin is in startling contrast to the lush, warm greens and blues of this verdant land.

There's a stately beauty to the way Lynch shoots the discovery of the corpse of Laura Palmer, a popular local girl, but even as you're becoming absorbed in the mystery of who killed her, Lynch and cowriter Mark Frost begin toying with their story's tone and rhythm.

The local police chief is improbably named Harry S. Truman, and he's played by Michael Ontkean, 16 years ago a rookie on The Rookies. Sheriff Truman is a pretty standard strong, silent type, but he has a gangling, neurotic deputy who collapses into racked sobbing upon seeing Laura's body. "Come on," Truman hisses disgustedly, "is this gonna happen every damn time?"

Very quickly, subplots surface: a power play for the ownership of the town's chief employer, Packard Sawmill, featuring Piper Laurie and The Last Emperor's Joan Chen; the unhappy marriage of Ed (Everett McGill), owner of Ed's Gas Farm, and his eye-patched wife; the romances and rivalries among the town's bored, looking-for-trouble teens. These are time-warped hoods who sneer, "Hey, it's happy hour in France" and swig whiskey from a flask at 8 in the morning. Lynch makes an erotic fetish out of closeups of the saddle shoes worn by a sloe-eyed bad girl played by Sherilyn Fenn.

(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/ew1990o.jpg)

So good at being bad: Twin Peaks' Sherilyn Fenn

Meanwhile, Angelo Badalamenti's beautifully tense, overwrought music fills the soundtrack, and vaguely familiar faces loom up here and there: The Mod Squad's Peggy Lipton as a sassy coffee-shop owner; West Side Story's Russ Tamblyn as a randy old goat of a psychiatrist.

Best of all, there's Kyle MacLachlan, looking like a young, demented Robert Vaughn, as FBI agent Dale Cooper. MacLachlan, who was in Lynch's Blue Velvet, here does a witty variation on the zombie-alien cop he played in the neglected 1987 B-movie The Hidden.

MacLachlan's Cooper seems like a goofball at first, walking around dictating his most banal thoughts into a tape recorder. ("Had a piece of cherry pie that was incredible!")

But then we see what Sheriff Truman sees: that Cooper's distracted dopiness is a cover for a brain working furiously, taking in every piece of information the world offers him and using it to solve his cases. MacLachlan has to deliver some of Lynch and Frost's most parodic, TV-spoofing dialogue, but he pulls it off with a devilish earnestness.

Will Twin Peaks be a hit? Not a chance in hell. (Well, maybe in hell...) Soaked corpses, sobbing deputies, and muttering G-men... it's all very unsettling, as is Lynch's refusal to signal the emotion he wants the viewer to feel in any given scene.

But strong emotions are very close to the surface in Twin Peaks, and that may also make viewers uncomfortable. When Laura's mother learns her daughter is dead, she doesn't whimper and sniffle the way most prime-time grievers do; she emits a gut-wrenching moan and then wails so loudly the walls of her home seem to shake. It's a shocking moment, moving and repellent at the same time.

Much as I enjoyed being unsettled-thrown for Lynch's loop - I also recognize that that's not what most people watch TV for, and I'm guessing that a hefty percentage of the millions who'll tune in out of curiosity won't make it past Peaks' grim first 15 minutes. Groans of "Honey, we're missing Married... With Children for this?" will resound throughout this great land, as remote-control trigger-fingers get itchy.

Cynical, anti-art NBC Entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff has phrased it perfectly: "I probably would want to live in a country where something like [Twin Peaks] could work," he told The Washington Post, "but I suspect it will be a tough road for them."

A show like this also invites all the standard philistine complaints - " It's boring"; "It's pretentious"; "Who wants to think when you're watching television?" - some of which I fully expect to hear from TV critics trying to break away from the pack.

But Twin Peaks is different from most other shows that have striven to be innovative, from Larry Gelbart's United States to Jay Tarses' The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. For one thing, Peaks is good - engrossing and funny; for another, it doesn't carry those shows' stink of smugness.

David Lynch isn't condescending to television. While Twin Peaks shares with his feature films an eerie airiness and sinister non sequiturs, it has its own video style.

Lynch has crafted the two-hour pilot around its commercial breaks, making what he has called "little movies," segments that build and climax before an ad dispels the mood. Twin Peaks makes you aware of just how slapped together most TV entertainment is; its calm, deliberate eccentricity is a virtue in itself.

ABC continues to be the only network taking bold chances. Elvis may or may not be dead, but, for seven more hour-long episodes starting April 12, the bodies and the non sequiturs will pile up, eccentricities will deepen into dementia, and Twin Peaks will live. Be there. A+

Copyright 1990 Entertainment Weekly

http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/ew1990f.html


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 12, 2007, 12:26:19 am
Great fun to revisit all of this!  A huge favorite in my family...

CREEPY.....

(http://www.tpbrewingco.com/download/tp01screen.jpg)

(http://heim.etherweave.com/weblog/archives/twinpeaks-thumb.jpg)

(http://photos3.flickr.com/4135666_38172fb35c.jpg)

Bob, Bob, Bob. All his scenes scare me. Especially at the end. Or when Laura Palmer walks into her room and sees Bob emerging from behind her dresser, and she screams, and he screams, and the camera shows a close-up of the inside of his mouth...

And talk about creepy!!!!

(http://media.monstersandcritics.com/articles/1286680/article_images/twin3.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:29:47 am
(http://www.douglas.eckhart.btinternet.co.uk/norma2.gif)

Norma Jennings


Norma Jennings (played by Peggy Lipton) is a character on Twin Peaks. She owns the Double R Diner, which she runs with Shelly Johnson, a good friend of hers, and is organizer of meals on wheels, formerly with Laura Palmer. She is a former Miss Twin Peaks, and her birthname is "Blackburn", as in her sister Annie. It is implied she may have some kind of Roman Catholic background.

She is the lover of Big Ed Hurley, and married to Hank Jennings, who is a paroled prisoner. Her mother is a food critic, and the two have a bad relationship. She does not care for Hank, but she adores Ed. She feels that she married the wrong man, and now she is stuck with him. She finds it difficult to trust Hank, because he is a criminal, and he has let her down in the past. What she would really like to do is to divorce Hank and marry Ed, but events continually prevent her from doing this.

The neon sign outside the diner says RR Diner, which may stand for Railroad Diner, in reference to its location.

(http://www.cinepad.com/twin_peaks/MarT%2099.JPG)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:31:30 am
Yes, they just released the DVD of it last week and I am watching the series.  Brings back memories of when I was growing up!  Too bad they cancelled it, it could have at least lasted two more seasons.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:34:28 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp32.jpg)

Birth date: 9/30/50
Sign: Libra
Likes: Big Ed
Education: Twin Peaks High School, Twin Peaks Community College
Actor: Peggy Lipton

Accomplishments:
I am a former Miss Twin Peaks from 1969 and the 1987 Twin Peaks Chamber of Commerce Small Business Owner of the Year.

Strengths:
I am always looking for new recipes for meat loaf and catfish. I make a mean cup of coffee.

Weaknesses:
I have made a poor choice in my selection of men, and I can't seem to resolve my difficult relationship with my mother.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 12, 2007, 12:39:09 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/peoplemay14b.jpg)(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/peoplemay14b1.jpg)
(http://www.lynchtown.com/immagini/TP-LogLady.jpg)(http://www.lynchtown.com/immagini/TP-Josie.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:39:45 am
(http://www.cenedra.com/twinpeaks/chara/hank.jpg)

Hank Jennings

Hank Jennings was a character on the ABC series Twin Peaks. He is the criminal (and during the first few episodes imprisoned) husband of Norma Jennings. Hank was played by Chris Mulkey.

He is a career criminal, albeit a more professional one than Leo Johnson. Bad to the bone, he is able to put on a nice-guy apperence and manages to convince some people. According to Sheriff Harry S. Truman, Hank once was a member of the Bookhouse Boys, and in fact, "one of the best", and was probably expelled for his criminal activities. In many ways, Hank is a counterpart of Sheriff Truman.

Prior to the start of the series, Hank has been hired by Josie Packard to arrange the death of her husband Andrew Packard, owner of the Packard Saw Mill, in a boating accident. (However, later it is revealed that Andrew anticipated and secretly avoided this attempt on his life.) Hank used his apparent involvement in an drunken driving accident as an alibi for the night of Andrew's death and for this was convicted of manslaughter. At the beginning of the series, he is still imprisoned but due for parole.

Hank has a difficult relationship with his wife Norma. Norma actually has an affair with Big Ed Hurley since high school and only due to misunderstandings, the two were married to other people. Hank's imprisonment provides the couple safety from Hank and hence the two are feeling uneasy about his imminent parole. Nonetheless, Norma gives a restrained but positive testimony in the parole hearing, ensuring his release, and provides him with a job at her Double R diner.

After his release, Hank violates parole by by committing a number of crimes and by crossing the Canadian border.

Immediately after his release, he threatens Josie, who had agreed to pay him $90,000 by Josie upon his release, and tries to extort more from her.

Hank is hired for a number of shady dealings by Benjamin Horne. In particular, he is responsible for shooting Leo, after Leo set fire to the Packard Mill on Hank's orders. The shot does not kill Leo, but sends him into a coma. Unbeknownst to him, this was witnessed by Bobby Briggs, whom Leo had been attacking with an axe at the time.

After crossing the Canadian border on orders of Benjamin Horne, he is captured by Franco-Canadian criminal Jean Renault and his henceforth involved in his doings, especially the takeover of One Eyed Jacks and the Dead Dog Farm stake out.

Hank is arrested and tries to get an alibi from his wife, Norma, while she is visiting his cell to tell him that she wants a divorce. Hank replies "you give me my alibi, and I'll give you a divorce". He also calls her Big Ed's "****", to which she replies that she'd "rather be his **** than your wife."

On being released, Hank decides to punish Ed for the affair with Norma but runs into Ed's superhumanly strong wife Nadine, who beats him to a pulp. Hank spends the remainder of the series on crutches.

Hank, trying to frighten Josie, is eventually killed by Mr Lee, one of Josie's associates from Hong Kong.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:41:36 am
Two cups of coffee, and a damned good slice of cherry pie!!


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:46:30 am
(http://web.ukonline.co.uk/amick.jsrpages/scans/amick/ak-m_amick-tp-03.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 12, 2007, 12:47:45 am
(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/regional%20chief%20gordonn%20cole%20david%20lynch.jpg)
Regional Chief Gordon Cole

(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/josie%20packard%20tpbrewingco.jpg)
Josie

(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/agent%20stanley%20fire%20walk%20with%20me.jpg)
Agent Stanley

(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/nadine.jpg)
Nadine


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:49:08 am
(http://web.ukonline.co.uk/amick.jsrpages/scans/amick/ak-m_amick-tp-04.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 12, 2007, 12:50:23 am
(http://styleskilling.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/one%20eye%20jacks%20sign.jpg)

One-Eyed Jack's sign


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:51:23 am
(http://www.binaryzone.org/babes/07_madchen.jpg)

Shelly Johnson is a fictional character played by Mädchen Amick on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks. Shelly works at the Double R diner which is owned by Norma Jennings, a good friend of hers.

Shelly dropped out of high school to marry trucker Leo Johnson, who had swept her off her feet by wining and dining her and so forth. As soon as they got married, it turned out that Leo just "wanted a maid he didn't have to pay for," in the words of Shelly. Leo is a monstrous home dictator, wife-beater, and dangerous criminal, and he is tangibly connected to Laura Palmer's murder.

Shelly has been having an affair with Laura's boyfriend, Bobby Briggs. Bobby, like Laura, is still in high school, and besides being a jock, he's something of a known hooligan. Although Bobby doesn't quite tread on the right side of the law, he is at least kind to Shelly, unlike Leo. The risk of the affair is great; Bobby deals drugs for Leo and knows just how dangerous Leo is.

During the show's second season, Leo lapses into a catatonic state and Shelly and Bobby openly flaunt their relationship in front of him.

(http://images.starpulse.com/Photos/Thumbs/Twin-Peaks-tv-14.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:56:01 am
Regional Chief Gordon Cole is actually series co-creator, David Lynch! Chris Isaak and Kiefer Sutherland play the FBi Agents in Fire: Walk with Me, a great movie! Lots more violent than the series, though.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 12:59:48 am
(http://images.quizilla.com/M/mattababy/1075690974_icturesleo.jpg)

Leo Johnson is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, portrayed by Eric Da Re.


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/ae/Leojohnson.png)

Leo in one of his more humorous scenes

Leo is one of the major suspects in the murder of Laura Palmer, with whom he had sex at least once. He is a drug runner, and is also linked with Jacques Renault, whom he smuggles over the border. According to the town sheriff, Johnson is free only because the department hasn’t found sufficient evidence.

Johnson beats up his wife Shelly regularly, often just because he can but also because of his (accurate) suspicions of her infidelity. He also reads Fleshworld magazine and advertises for sexual link-ups through it.

Leo traps Shelly in the Packard Saw Mill and sets it in on fire as revenge for her affair with Bobby Briggs, but Shelly is freed by Catherine Packard Martell and survives. To cover for the fire, Ben Horne hires Hank Jennings to shoot Johnson. By coincidence, Johnson is attacking Bobby at the time (with an axe), so Bobby witnesses Hank shooting Johnson.

Leo subsequently lapses into a coma, and is confined a wheelchair. He appears to be brain damaged, but eventually returns to consciousness by unknown means and attacks Shelly.

Towards the end of the second season, he becomes Windom Earle’s slave, and is controlled by an electrified collar. He releases Major Garland Briggs from captivity, apparently finding some degree of redemption in his desire to save Shelly from Earle. Earle responds by confining Johnson in a contraption which will release deadly spiders on his body as soon as he unclenches his jaw.

Leo briefly appears in the series finale as he is still clenching the contraption with his jaw. Because of the series' cancellation, his ultimate fate is unknown.

(http://images.starpulse.com/Photos/Thumbs/Twin-Peaks-tv-15.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:02:49 am
(http://dyskenzo.pop.e-wro.pl/tp/postacie/leo.jpg)

(http://www.zonadvd.com/imagenes/analisis/jordi/twinpeaks1/5.jpg)

(http://www.nicepics.blogger.com.br/twin_peaks_20.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:06:32 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp35.jpg)

Leo Johnson

Birth date: 4/25/68
Sign: Taurus
Likes: Ice cream, birthday cake, and money
Education: Twin Peaks High School, MTA Truck Drivers School
Actor: Eric DaRe

Accomplishments:
With the money I saved from my paper route and various other capital ventures, I was able to buy my own 16-wheel rig by the time I was 20. I love having the freedom to pick up and go any time I want. I've driven across the country over 100 times, but never with Shelley. I was a hall monitor in high school.

Strengths:
I'm not afraid to make a buck, and I am a good provider for my wife.

Weaknesses:
I am a bad judge of character. It seems that I'm always getting involved with the wrong kinds of people. Because of this, I let my temper get to me at times.[/b
]


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:09:24 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp34.jpg)

Shelley Johnson

Nickname: Shel
Birth date: 5/30/72
Sign: Gemini
Likes: Television - mostly soap operas
Education: Twin Peaks High School (completed two years, never graduated)
Actor: Madchen Amick

Accomplishments:
I can't think of anything that I have really achieved. I try to be a good wife. I am a hard worker, and I think I am a good waitress. The customers at the RR Diner seem to like me, and Norma always says that I am very helpful to her. Who knows? Maybe one day, Norma might let me become manager. Now that would be an accomplishment.

Strengths:
I am very tolerant and acception of others.

Weaknesses:
I should have stayed in school and gotten a bit more mature before marrying. I feel I have missed something.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:11:32 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp31.jpg)

RR Diner

Location:
Located on Highway J, down the street from Horne's Department Store.

Points of Interest:
Owned and operated by Norma Jennings, the RR Diner serves as the crossroad of Twin Peaks. The 1950's look of the diner is just one part of its appear Damn good coffe and cherry pie are two more enticing reasons to stop by. Open seven days a week, the RR Diner serves breakfast, lunch and daily Early Bird Dinner Specials for $7.34. Highlights of the diner's other food delights are mentioned in the Twin Peaks Access Guide.

As a community service, Norma Jennings bakes six fruit pies each July 4th for Eagle Scout Troop #294's Pie-Eating Contest. All visitors and RR Diner regulars are invited to attend.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:13:06 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp07.jpg)

Recipe

8 inch Crust: 1-1/2 c. flour, 1/2 c. Crisco, 1/4 c. ice water
Mix flour and Crisco with fork. Add ice water. Mix with your hands. When blended, roll into ball and refrigerate overnight. To roll out: flour both rolling pin and flat surface, split ball in two, roll out 1/2 to fit pan and 1/2 for lattice.
Filling: 3 c. cherries (pitted, sour frozen); 1 c. water; 1c. Baker's sugar; 4 T. cornstarch; 1/8 t. salt
Thaw cherries at room temp and strain (yields 2 c. juice). Taste for sweetness, more/less sugar may be needed. Add 1 c. water to make 3 c. juice (reserve 1 c. juice for cornstarch mix). Dissolve cornstarch in 1 c. juice, stir with whip. Combine 2 c. juice, 2/3 c. sugar, salt, and bring to a boil. Add cornstarch mix, cook until clear, about 5 min. (if cooked to long, syrup gets gummy). Remove from heat, stir in 1/3 c. sugar (blend thoroughly). Pour mixture over cherries, fold with wooden spoon, cool (stir mix while cooling to prevent scum from forming on top). Pour mix in pie shell. Top completed pie with lattice crust. Bake @ 425 degrees for 35-40 min.
"...And if you're ever in Los Angeles, Diane, try Twin Peaks Cherry Pie at DuPars REstaurant and Bakery."


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:16:29 am
(http://www.geocities.com/athens/5651/BOB.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:18:48 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9d/Briggs.jpg)

Bobby Briggs


Robert "Bobby" Briggs (Dana Ashbrook) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He is not to be confused with BOB. He was the boyfriend of Laura Palmer and therefore one of the lead suspects. He is the son of Major Garland Briggs, and has an uneasy relationship with his father, who is very strict and seemingly non-understanding about his son's rebelliousness, especially his smoking.

Bobby becomes jealous of James Hurley when he discovers he was secretly seeing his official girlfriend, Laura. Laura Palmer on the other hand did not really love Bobby, she only used him to get a part of Bobby's ****. Bobby was secretly seeing Shelly Johnson even before Laura's death, and they move in together when Leo Johnson becomes comatose.

(http://rollmops.files.wordpress.com/2007/01/tp-04.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:20:45 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp36.jpg)

Bobby Briggs

Nickname: Briggsee
Birth date: 12/10/72
Sign: Sagittarius
Likes: Football
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Dana Ashbrook

Accomplishments:
I was the starting quarter back on the Twin Peaks High School football team and captain of the team my senior year. I hold the record for most pass completions (150) in the school's history. I was also voted "Most Handsome" my senior year.

Strengths:
My strengths are my strong are and leadership qualities. I am very successful with chicks. Shelley adores me.

Weaknesses:
I do not study much and, for that matter, hate going to class. I prefer short cuts to success.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:23:55 am
(http://www.buddytv.com/articles/stargate-sg1/images/don-davis-1.jpg)

Major Garland Briggs is a fictional character on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks, portrayed by Don S. Davis. He is a U. S. Air Force officer involved in Project Blue Book. He is the father of Bobby Briggs, whose smoking he cannot abide. His work is highly classified; he does not tell even his family about it.

His name is probably taken from a mathematician who worked with J. W. Alexander.

The role can be seen as a precursor to Davis’s character Lt. Gen. George Hammond on the series Stargate SG-1, who is also an Air Force officer involved in secret projects.

His greatest fear is “the possibility that love is not enough.”

Due to Major Briggs’s secret investigations, the entrance to the Black Lodge is discovered in the woods at Twin Peaks. He is himself abducted (taken to the White Lodge?), and is told to deliver a message to Special Agent Dale Cooper at one point, by the Log Lady.

In the second season, Major Briggs and Bobby find some common ground and make up.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:26:13 am
(http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcards/tpsp08.jpg)

Sheriff's Station

Location:
Located in the center of Twin Peaks on Highway 21 (Main Street)

Points of Interest:
Moving up the ranks from Assistant Sheriff, Harry S. Truman has successfully run the Sheriff's Station for the past six years. The Sheriff's office has state-of-the-art equipment including an eight-line telephone system and intercom, photocopy machine, fax machine (since 1988), fingerpringing, Polaroid camera, and three maximum security cells, from which no one has ever escaped, until BOB.
The Station is just two blocks from the Wagon Wheel Bakery, and fresh coffee and donuts are supplied daily to the office personnel and visitors. Tours are available on Tuesdays.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:27:03 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/94/Kimmyrobertson.jpg)

Lucy Moran is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Kimmy Robertson.

Lucy is a high voiced, childlike blonde receptionist at the Twin Peaks' sheriff's department. She is seeing deputy sheriff Andy Brennan, until she they have an argument. She reveals later that she was also seeing Richard Tremayne, Horn's Department Store, Men's Fashion, after feeling frustrated with Andy. Lucy gets pregnant, which turns out to be the reason why she and Andy have been fighting. The paternity of the child is called into question when Andy reveals that he cannot be the father of the baby, due to low sperm count. He gets retested and finds out that he could have been the father. This sparks off a competition between Andy and Dick Tremaine, both vying for Lucy's affection and the role of father to her child. This includes adopting "Little Nicky" through the Big Brothers program. After some particularly rude behavior from Dick Tremaine, Lucy decides not to wait for the baby to be born in order to determine paternity and chooses Andy as the father of her child.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:32:00 am
(http://images.quizilla.com/M/mattababy/1075694817_cturesandy.jpg)

Andy Brennan

Andy Brennan is a character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Harry Goaz. Andy is a bit slow, even "dimwitted" deputy sheriff in the Twin Peaks Sheriff's department. He is very sensitive, and tends to cry at crime scenes. However, he is very loyal, and trustworthy... indeed at one point Albert Rosenfield compares him to a dog.

Andy has been seeing the secretary of sheriff's department, Lucy Moran. She, however has grown tired of him, and seeks an adventure from seeing Dick Tremayne. Not much is revealed of Andy during the show, except perhaps through physical comedy, such as his inadequacy at handling guns and sticky tape. However, Andy later improves his gun toting skills by using the local range, and shooting Jacques Renault when he tries to go for Sheriff Truman.

Andy was the one who (at Season Two) figured out that the drawing was a map, and therefore had a big part in FBI agent Dale Cooper finding his way to the Black Lodge.

In the pilot, he is revealed as a trumpeter, albeit not a very good one. And he has a talent at drawing which we see demonstrated when he sketches Bob from Sarah Palmer's vision, and during the trial of Leland Palmer, when he sketches the back of Leland's head.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:35:27 am
(http://www.telvis.fi/c/49628/4099_MichaelHorse175.jpg)

Hawk
Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, portrayed by Michael Horse. He is a Native American, but it is not clear which tribe he belongs to. He is usually referred to as "Hawk" because of his excellent tracking skills, which extend not just to animal or human tracks, but also those of cars and trucks. He was born in 1951.

Hawk works at the Twin Peaks sheriff's department under Sheriff Harry S. Truman. He is one of the Bookhouse Boys, and is an all-around dependable good guy. He has an unseen girlfriend who is a veterinarian.

Hawk knows Harry (and FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper) well, which saves their lives on more than one occasion.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:36:18 am
(http://www.frouke.org/andy_addiction/tn/hawk.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:40:29 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2a/Twinpeaks4.jpg)

Man from Another Place

The Man from Another Place (or "the Arm") also called The Midget or “The Dancing Dwarf” is a character in the Mark Frost and David Lynch television series, Twin Peaks. He is portrayed by Michael J. Anderson. In the original broadcast version of the series, he made his first appearance in the second episode of the first season, “Zen, or the Skill to Catch a Killer", however his first appearance for international audiences was in the so-called "International Version" of the show's pilot episode, which featured an ending that differed from what was broadcast in the United States.

The Man from Another Place is one of several spirits that live primarily in the White and Black Lodges, other dimensional places which are sometimes accessed by the unwary in the woods surrounding the town of Twin Peaks. The lodges seem to represent good and evil. The living can accidentally find them and become trapped in them. The lodges are also accessible to the souls of the dead. The spirits of the lodges seem to have different purposes. Some are evil, and feed on pain, lust, and more importantly, fear. Some visit the living in dreams or appear out in the open, often to deliver mysterious warnings. The Man from Another Place has been seen to deliver warnings or shed light on mysterious tragedies, as well as mediate among the spirits, suggesting that he is a figure of balance. However, his counterpart, the Giant, has also delivered warnings and provided clues to Agent Cooper in his search for the truth.

The Man from Another Place is dressed in a sharp red suit, is very short, and talks in an odd, distorted way. He seems to reside in a red curtained room, later learned to be the White and Black Lodges.[citation needed] If nothing else, the color scheme represents fear, terror, arousal, and imminent danger. The Man dances in an odd, old fashioned way to jazzy music (the song is "Dance of the Dream Man"). There exists in the Man from Another Place the queer promise of a strange, occult knowledge that is paramount for FBI Agent Dale Cooper in his pursuit of Laura Palmer’s killer.

The events that occur in the White and Black Lodges do not always happen concurrently with the linear timeline of the outside world, suggesting that they exist outside of the regular flow of time, and can be unremembered by those who experience them. FBI Agent Dale Cooper first encounters the Man from Another Place, and the Lodges, in a dream which a caption (25 years later...) indicates depicts some kind of future events, and in the dream Cooper is noticeably older (a version of this sequence is used in the International Version of the pilot). In the movie prequel Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Laura Palmer has a dream where she sees a young Dale Cooper meet the Man in the Lodge for the first time. When Cooper later dreams of the Lodge, he has no memory of this encounter.

The character appears in five episodes over the course of the series, as well as material from the second episode which was aired as part of the pilot episode when released as an individual release in Europe and Japan.

In the prequel to the Twin Peaks TV series, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, he appears again in a dream, where he enigmatically tells Agent Dale Cooper “I am the arm.” Interestingly, another character, Phillip Gerard AKA “Mike,” is missing an arm, raising the probable conclusion that The Man From Another Place is the spiritual embodiment of the missing arm, which Mike cut off to free himself from his evil impulses, also making the Giant the spiritual embodiment of the body, from which the arm was cast. This conclusion is further reinforced by the scene that takes place in the Black Lodge at the end of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me which depicts Mike and the Man from Another Place speaking in unison while the latter places his hand upon the spot where Mike's arm used to be. In Agent Cooper's dream, the Man from Another Place also says, “My voice sounds like this,” and makes a high pitched beeping noise, like a beacon. This same noise is heard twice in the movie: when Agent Chester Desmond visits a trailer park and disappears and when Leland and Laura Palmer are driving and Phillip Gerard approaches them in his vehicle. When Cooper investigates the trailer park, he finds the words “Let’s Rock” scrawled across the windshield of Desmond’s car. These same words are spoken by the Man in the “25 years later...” dream in Twin Peaks’s second episode.

Agent Cooper is also visited in dreams by the Giant (who is "One and the same" with the dwarf, lending to theories that the waiting room is a neutral place between the shadow and the light. In the show's final episode, Cooper enters the White and Black Lodges. He again encounters the little man, as well as the Giant. The Giant sits on the couch next to the little man, and they say to Cooper, "one and the same". In this same final episode, the spirits and souls that appear in the black lodge seemed to have good or evil doubles, including, surprisingly, the Man from Another Place (both the Giant and the Midget are represented as a pair on the petroglyph found in Twin Peaks' Owl Cave).

The strange cadence of the Man’s dialogue was achieved by having Michael J. Anderson speak into a recorder. This was then played in reverse, and Anderson was directed to repeat the reversed original. This “reverse-speak” was then reversed again in editing to bring it back to the normal direction. This created the strange rhythm and accentuation that set Cooper’s dream world apart from the real world.

Michael J. Anderson recalls that his reverse-speak was not difficult to master as, coincidentally, he had used it as a secret language with his junior high school friends. David Lynch was unaware of this when he cast Anderson in the part, and even hired a trainer to help Anderson with the enunciations, but when he found out he could already talk backwards so well he cancelled the trainer and wrote more and more difficult lines of dialogue for Anderson to read.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:43:45 am
(http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/tpgiant.jpg)

The Giant is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Carel Struycken.

FBI agent Dale Cooper has seen the Giant in visions or while asleep. The Giant seems to be on the side of good, and he has given Cooper signs of what is to come and clues about the murder of Laura Palmer.

The giant seems to reside in the waiting room of the lodges (the Black Lodge and the White Lodge) with the Man from Another Place (the midget). They are "one and the same", implying that the waiting room is a neutral location.

The giant's visitations are often preceded by real world appearances of The Elderly Room Service Waiter, who wears a similar outfit to the Giant.

In the show's final episode, Cooper enters the otherworldly White and Black Lodges. There, he again encounters the little Man from Another Place. The Giant also appears, and sits on the couch next to the little man. They both look at Cooper and say, "one and the same".

(http://content.ytmnd.com/content/0/1/8/0181bbafbc0a46bd944ad1b8cd4cdb97.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:45:52 am
(http://digilander.libero.it/twinpeaks3/bob2.jpg)

Bob, often written as BOB or Killer BOB, is the primary villain in the TV series Twin Peaks. He is portrayed as a malevolent entity who possesses people and feeds off their garmonbozia (pain and suffering). He was played by Frank Silva.


Bob possesses people and uses their bodies to murder and ****. He is an evil spirit of some kind, who has a connection to the woods and the owls outside the town. Everytime BOB kills someone, he places a letter underneath the victim's nail to spell out his real name "ROBERT".

Bob was once human; in his corporeal form, he was a serial killer whose partner in murder was a man named Mike (Al Strobel). At some point, Mike had a religious epiphany and repented, cutting off his own arm to rid himself of his "Fire Walk With Me" tattoo, which symbolised being touched by an "evil one". When Bob would not repent, Mike killed him. Bob's spirit remained however, and possessed Leland Palmer in order to continue his spree. Mike searched for Bob, aware that he was still killing, but unable to tell who his host was.

Bob's victims are not fully aware that they are possessed. Leland Palmer was possessed by Bob when he was still a boy. As an adult, Leland molested, raped and eventually murdered his daughter, Laura, all while under Bob's influence. It is implied that Laura allowed herself to be killed, because she knew that death was the only escape from being Bob's next host. Bob's bloodlust took over and he killed Laura through Leland, robbing himself of his new chosen host body.

By the end of the series (including the prequel film), Bob is known to have killed at least three people through Leland: Teresa Banks, Leland's mistress; Laura Palmer, Leland's daughter; and Madeline Ferguson, Leland's niece. He kills Leland by smashing him into the jail wall. In the final episode, Bob seems to be absorbing the soul of Windom Earle in the Black Lodge.

Bob possesses several people during the show's run, and the final episode of the show climaxed with Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) being possessed by Bob.

Bob is a symbol of the evil that can lurk beneath the surface of apparently ordinary people. FBI agent Albert Rosenfield articulates this at one point, suggesting that Bob is not a real entity unto itself, but rather an embodiment of "the evil that men do".

The all-capitals form of his name, "BOB", is described in Jennifer Lynch's spin-off book The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer as a warning for people to Beware Of Bob.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:47:32 am
(http://www.ceskatelevize.cz/specialy/twinpeaks/foto/twin_peaks_37.jpg)

Frank Silva (31 October 1949-13 September 1995) was a Portuguese American set dresser and sometime actor best known for his disturbing performance as the evil spirit Bob in the TV series Twin Peaks.

Silva had a degree in lighting design from San Francisco State University and worked as a prop master and set decorator on several films including David Lynch’s Wild at Heart.

Silva also worked on Lynch’s Twin Peaks. According to David Lynch on the 2007 Gold Edition DVD release of Twin Peaks, Lynch was upstairs in the Laura Palmer house, near Silva as he worked, and suddenly realized that Silva might have a place in the show. He asked Silva if he was an actor, and Silva said that he was. Later, Lynch accidentally caught him on camera when his reflection appeared in a mirror, and thus was born the character of Bob, a dark spirit who haunts Laura. Silva appeared occasionally as Bob, or Killer BOB, for the remainder of the Twin Peaks series and even appeared as Bob in the 1992 feature movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. His first major appearance is in the International Version of the Twin Peaks pilot, which contained a standalone ending that resolved the mystery of the series and incorporated the above-mentioned accidental footage.

Frank Silva died from a heart condition/AIDS in 1995 at age 45.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:53:00 am
Frank Silva was a set decorator who worked on the pilot episode. One day, when he was moving furniture in Laura Palmer's bedroom, a woman remarked to Silva not to get locked in the (Laura Palmer's) room. The image of Silva trapped in the room sparked something in Lynch, who then asked Silva if he was an actor. Silva replied "Yes", and Lynch told him that he had a part in mind for him on the series. Silva accepted, and Lynch shot footage of him behind Laura's bed with no real idea of what he would do with it.

When Lynch shot the scene of Sarah Palmer's frightening vision, Silva's reflection was accidentally caught in the footage. Silva can be seen in the mirror behind Sarah Palmer's head. Lynch was made aware of this accident, but decided to keep Silva in the scene.

MIKE's appearance in the pilot episode was only originally intended to be a "kind of homage to The Fugitive. The only thing he was gonna do was be in this elevator and walk out."[4] However, when Lynch wrote the "Fire walk with me" speech, he imagined MIKE saying it in the basement of the Twin Peaks hospital – a scene that would appear in the European version of the pilot episode, and surface later in Agent Cooper's dream sequence. MIKE's full name, Phillip Michael Gerard, is also a reference to Lieutenant Philip Gerard, a character in The Fugitive.

Lynch met Michael J. Anderson in 1987. After seeing him in a short film, Lynch wanted to cast the actor in the title role in Ronnie Rocket, but that project failed to get made. While editing the alternate ending of the foreign version of the pilot episode, an idea occurred to Lynch on his way home one day: "I was leaning against a car — the front of me was leaning against this very warm car. My hands were on the roof and the metal was very hot. The Red Room scene leapt into my mind. 'Little Mike' was there, and he was speaking backwards... For the rest of the night I thought only about The Red Room."


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:55:32 am
(http://www.lynchposters.com/Images/TP-ABC-Laura-signed.jpg)

To save on money, Lynch intended to cast a local girl from Seattle "just to play a dead girl".[4] The local girl ended up being Sheryl Lee. "But no one — not Mark, me, anyone — had any idea that she could act, or that she was going to be so powerful just being dead."[4]Indeed, the image of Lee wrapped in plastic became one of the show's most enduring and memorable images. And then, while Lynch shot the home movie that James takes of Donna and Laura, he realized that Lee had something special. "She did do another scene — the video with Donna on the picnic — and it was that scene that did it."[4] As a result, Sheryl Lee became a semi-regular addition to the cast, appearing in flashbacks as Laura, and becoming a recurring character — Maddy, Laura's cousin who also becomes another victim of BOB.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 01:57:47 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ca/Bscap036.jpg)

As with much of Lynch's other work (notably Blue Velvet), Twin Peaks explores the gulf between the veneer of small-town respectability and the seedier layers of life beneath it. Each character from the town leads a double life. The show further resembles Lynch's previous and subsequent work, in that it is difficult to place in a defined genre: stylistically, the program borrows the unsettling tone and supernatural premises of horror films, and simultaneously offers a bizarrely comical parody of American soap operas with a campy, melodramatic presentation of the morally-dubious activities of its characters. Finally, like the rest of Lynch's oeuvre, the show represents an earnest moral inquiry distinguished by both weird comedy and a deep vein of surrealism.

A popular feature of the series was Frost and Lynch's use of repeating and sometimes mysterious motifs — trees, water, coffee, donuts, owls, ducks, fire — and numerous embedded references to other films and TV shows, such as The Twilight Zone (mysteriously malfunctioning electrical equipment), and The Patty Duke Show (the phenomenon of identical cousins).


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:00:41 am
Invitation to Love is a fictional soap opera in Twin Peaks. It is seen briefly on TV screens in all but the first of seven episodes of the first season, and was shot in the Ennis House.

The show acts as a commentary on events unfolding in Twin Peaks itself, often highlighting some of the more outlandish or melodramatic elements of the show. The most obvious example of this "show-within-a-show" commentary can be found when Maddy Ferguson, the near-identical cousin of Laura Palmer, first arrives in Twin Peaks. Just before Maddy first appears on the show, an episode of Invitation to Love is shown in which it is revealed that there are identical twin characters in Invitation to Love who are played by the same actress, much as Maddy and Laura Palmer are almost identical, and are both played by Sheryl Lee. It is also implied in the brief snippet of the show that is shown that Jade and Emerald, the two characters in Invitation to Love, are characters with very different personalities, much as sweet and innocent Maddy is diametrically opposed to the dark and secretive Laura in Twin Peaks.
Another example can be found in the final episode of the first season, when Leo Johnson is shot in a dramatic fashion, and a similar event is shown happening to the character of Montana in Invitation to Love. Both shootings involve the character who has been shot lying down and slowly dying.
There is one final reference in one episode of the second season (audio only).
Invitation characters
•   Jared Lancaster, soap patriarch and owner of "The Towers". Aging father to Emerald and Jade. Played by "Evan St. Vincent" (Peter Michael Goetz).
•   Chet, geeky husband to Jade, and keeper of Jared's will. He is played by the fictional actor "Martin Hadley" (Lance Davis).
•   Montana, an aggressive, rapacious bully who schemes with Emerald to gain ownership of The Towers. He is played by "Jason Denbo" (Rick Giolito).
•   Emerald, seductive, manipulative twin sister to Jade. Schemes with Montana to end her father's life and collect the inheritance. Played by "Selina Swift" (Erika Anderson).
•   Jade, sweeter, more innocent twin to Emerald, who tries to save her father's life. Wife of Chet. Also played by "Selina Swift" (Erika Anderson).
Lynch later reused the motif of a show-within-a-show in his film Inland Empire which incorporated a secondary series, Rabbits. The more recent series, Ugly Betty also employed a similar recurring motif in its first season.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:01:49 am
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The pilot episode, first shown on TV in the US, was released on video in Europe in 1989. The European version is 20 minutes longer than the TV pilot, with a different ending added to bring closure to the story. Cooper, Truman, Hawk, and Andy find BOB, who admits to Laura's murder, and then is shot by MIKE, the one-armed man. The Red Room dream sequence that ends episode 2, where Cooper encounters the Man from Another Place and Laura Palmer, was originally shot for this film. Lynch was so happy with the material that he incorporated part of it into the second episode of the regular series (that is, the third episode shown in the U.S., including the pilot) as a dream Cooper has about the case. This version of the pilot was also offered by Warner Home Video in the United States, resulting in a rights-entanglement which prevented the broadcast version of the pilot being released for a number of years. On October 30, 2007, the broadcast version of the pilot finally received a legitimate U.S. release as part of the Twin Peaks "Definitive Gold Box Edition". This set includes both versions of the pilot.[14]

On December 18, 2001, the first season (episodes 1-7, minus the pilot) of Twin Peaks was released on DVD in Region 1 for the very first time by Republic Pictures, then a unit of Spelling Entertainment, (which had an output deal through Artisan Entertainment, now part of Lions Gate Entertainment). The box set was noted for being the first TV show to have its audio track redone in DTS. The region 1 release was heavily criticized for not including the key pilot episode, which could not be included due to the fact Lynch sold the rights to it to Warner Home Video in order to facilitate its video release in Europe. When the series was released on video in the US (twice by Spelling Entertainment's Worldvision Home Video), the pilot episode was excluded both times. In turn, Warner Home Video released the pilot on video — however, it was actually the European version, and was labelled as having "bonus footage". The televised pilot episode is included in the UK (region 2) DVD release from Universal Home Entertainment. A DVD collection of Season One was released in Australia by Paramount Pictures, in 2001. In 2006, Season 2 was released by the same distributor in two parts (Collections 1 and 2). In addition, the entire series was released in Australia in a box set collector's edition.

The first season DVD box set is known to have production errors, which cause many DVD players to freeze. One known track glitch occurs during the opening credits of episode 2. Another glitch occurs fifteen minutes into episode 4, during Donna and Audrey's scene in the girls' high school lavatory. The European DVD box set of season two has an audio flaw where in episode 12, the center and right channels have been flip-flopped.

The release of Season Two was complicated by the sale of Spelling Entertainment (which included both Republic Pictures, and the predecessor company, Worldvision Enterprises, the series' former distributor) to Paramount/Viacom in 1998; the transition of home video rights to Paramount/Viacom; and the later 2006 split of Viacom into two separate companies — this saw the rights go to CBS Corporation/CBS Studios. Also, Lynch oversaw the transfer from video to DVD personally, but was delayed by the production of his new film, Inland Empire.

The first season was released on DVD by Artisan Entertainment, the video licensee for Republic, but Artisan/Lions Gate's rights expired in September 2005, and thus were transferred to Paramount/Viacom. As a result of the 2006 corporate split of CBS and Viacom, CBS Studios (which ended up with Republic Pictures' and Spelling Entertainment's TV holdings) now owns the rights to the Twin Peaks series, with CBS Television Distribution handling syndication.

The second season release was postponed several times, from September 2004, to early 2005, and then to September 2005, to early 2006. Season Two was finally released in the United States and Canada on April 3, 2007 via Paramount Home Video/CBS DVD, which now acts as home video distributor.

In Germany, Season 2 was released in two parts on separate dates in April 2007. Part 1 went on general release on January 4, 2007, including the "broadcast" version of the pilot episode.

North American rights to the Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me film are owned by New Line Cinema, a division of Time Warner (which also owns Warner Bros.), and is available on video and DVD through New Line. In Canada, the DVD was distributed through Alliance Atlantis, which holds all Canadian rights to the New Line library.

At the 2007 San Diego Comic-Con, a Twin Peaks box set was confirmed for release. It includes both seasons, the two versions of the Pilot episode, deleted scenes for both seasons, and a feature-length retrospective documentary. It was released on October 30, 2007.[15]



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:03:45 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/62/Twin_Peaks_Season_1.jpg)

Season 1   7   December 18, 2001
•   Directors' Audio Commentaries
•   On-Camera Interviews with the Cast
•   Additional Interviews with Cinema and Television Experts
•   Archival Materials from the Fanzine for "Twin Peaks" - Wrapped In Plastic; the official Twin Peaks magazine
•   Log Lady Introductions
•   Written synopsis of pilot episode


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:05:38 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/TwinPeaksS2.jpg)

   Season 2   22   April 3, 2007
•   Interactive Interview Grid
•   Behind the Scenes with Kyle MacLachlan, Madchen Amick, Sherilyn Fenn, David Duchovny, and more
•   Season 2 "Log Lady Introductions"
•   Insights by Caleb Deschanel, Duwayne Dunham, Todd Holland, Tim Hunter, Stephen Gyllenhaal, and Jennifer Lynch


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:09:04 am
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e6/Peaks2.jpg)

 
The Definitive Gold Box Edition   31   October 30, 2007
•   Pilot episode (both U.S. broadcast and international theatrical versions, with an option to view the alternate international ending separately)
•   Deleted scenes from several episodes
•   "A Slice of Lynch", a roundtable discussion, filmed in a coffee shop, featuring David Lynch, Kyle MacLachlan, Madchen Amick, and series post-production co-ordinator John Wentworth
•   "Secrets from Another Place", a feature-length documentary on the history of the series, featuring interviews with Mark Frost and most series cast members
•   "Return to Twin Peaks", a featurette on the 2006 Twin Peaks Festival which united fans and cast members
•   The complete "Log Lady Introductions" used to open the syndicated versions of the episodes (dubbed from a degraded videotape source)
•   Two segments from the September 29, 1990 edition of Saturday Night Live which was guest-hosted by Kyle MacLachlan: his opening monologue, which spoofs the secrecy over the identity of Laura Palmer's killer, and a spoof of the series itself with MacLachlan reprising the role of Cooper and the SNL cast playing the other roles
•   Behind-the-scenes photo galleries and an archive of production documents
•   Interactive Twin Peaks map with links to then-and-now footage of the show's Washington filming locations
•   An envelope containing a randomly distributed set of Twin Peaks postcards featuring images from the series. Each box contains a different assortment of cards
•   Archival promotional spots for the series, including ABC network promos and commercial break lead-in/lead-out "bumpers" recorded by Kimmy Robertson
•   A series of commercials filmed for broadcast in Japan, advertising a brand of canned coffee, featuring most of the cast
•   An audio archive of a 1-900 recorded phone line that offered clues regarding the murder of Laura Palmer
•   "Falling" music video featuring Julee Cruise


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:16:48 am
Books of Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks has spawned several successful books due to its success. During the show's second season, Pocket Books released three official tie-in books, each authored by the show's creators (or their family) which offer a wealth of backstory.


(http://www.pandora.ca/pictures181/966046.jpg)


The Autobiography of F.B.I. Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes

(ISBN 978-0-330-27280-3), 1991: by Scott Frost (Mark Frost's brother). A collection of transcripts from Agent Dale Cooper's audio tapes, from his childhood to the day he is assigned to Laura Palmer's murder. The book includes Dale's upbringing in Philadelphia, family, education at Quaker institutions Germantown Friends School and Haverford College, first stumbles with love, obsession with the FBI, and the relationship between himself, Windom Earle, and Earle's wife. Many of these tape transcripts are dictated to "Diane," though a later tape states that Cooper enjoys the thought of Diane listening to his tapes so much that he will address all tapes to her, whether she will ever listen to them or not.

An audio tape version of the book, recorded by Kyle MacLachlan, was nominated for a Grammy Award for best spoken-word performance.


(http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Corridor/7732/diary.jpg)


The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer

(ISBN 978-0-671-73590-6), 1990, written by Jennifer Lynch (David Lynch's daughter). Lynch paints a haunting portrait of an abused teen's double life, falling into a world of prostitution and drug abuse, while maintaining the status quo as homecoming queen and high school student. Published during the summer between the original broadcasts of the first and second seasons, the book provided fans with much-sought-after information regarding Laura's veiled personal life, including her knowledge of and/or relationship with the enigmatic character of "Killer Bob." With the exception of a discrepancy in the actual year of Laura's death (a discrepancy that is actually salient in the pilot episode vs. the rest of the series), Lynch's book is faithful to the Lynch/Frost collaboration as it existed at the time of its publication (while there is some accurate crossover, later episodes in Season Two would refer to diary entries that do not appear in Lynch's work).


Twin Peaks: An Access Guide to the Town

(ISBN 978-0-671-74399-4) 1991. This is the most lighthearted and humorous of the books. The book is a parody of a traveler's guide book, as published by the Twin Peaks Chamber of Commerce. Inside, fans can find anything from a history of the Native Americans around the area, to a list of songs on the jukebox in the Double-R Diner. A double-page ad in the middle portrays David Lynch and Mark Frost as brothers "Tim and Tom," who offer a "Taxi-Dermy" service: the blind Tim (Lynch) will drive you anywhere within the Twin Peaks city limits, while Tom (Frost) will stuff and mount any fish or game, up to and including the size of a bear. Pete Martell refers to the shop during the series while displaying a taxidermied fish.


Audio book spin-off

Early in season 2, Simon & Schuster Audio released Diane ... The Twin Peaks Tapes of Agent Cooper, a cassette-only release performed by Kyle MacLachlan. The tape consisted of newly-recorded Cooper messages to his never-seen assistant, Diane, mixed in with monologues from the original broadcasts. The tape begins with a prologue monologue in which Cooper discusses his pending trip to Twin Peaks, continues with the initial monologue heard in the pilot, and continues to a point after his recovery from being shot.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:19:17 am
(http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/yari_film/gray_matters/heather_graham/gray2.jpg)

Annie Blackburn

Annie Blackburn, b. December 24, 1971 is a character in the Mark Frost and David Lynch television series, Twin Peaks. She is portrayed by Heather Graham. She is the sister of Norma Jennings, from whom she gets a job in the RR Diner.

She appears in the final 6 episodes of the series and briefly in the prequel feature film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me. She grew up in Twin Peaks, but, after a painful romantic experience that led to a suicide attempt, she went to live in a convent. She hasn't decided if she wants to remain in the secular world, but is willing to see what it can offer her. Despite her lack of experience outside the convent, Annie is not naive about everyday sorrows and transgressions. She can be seen as a mirror for FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.

She seems to possess an intangible quality that he is drawn to, almost hypnotically. Annie ultimately begins to represent a dark and painful truth from his past. Subsequently, she is cast into Agent Cooper's urgent quest to elude/capture the progenitor of his increasingly nightmarish existence. In the final episode of the series she is trapped in the Black Lodge by Windom Earle who brings her there as his "Queen" after she wins Miss Twin Peaks (Earl was playing a "sick chess game" involving real people prior to this) At the end of the episode Dale Cooper is himself possessed by the spirit of Bob, and he and Annie depart the Black Lodge.

In Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Annie appears to Laura Palmer in a dream bruised and bloodied to warn her of her death, but as the events are still to happen, Laura does not understand the message. Annie says, "My name is Annie, and I've been with Laura and Dale. The good Dale is in the Lodge, and he can't leave. Write it in your diary."



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:22:23 am
(http://www.geocities.com/joanchen2/joan_chen.jpg)

Josie Packard

Jocelyn "Josie" Packard is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, played by Joan Chen. She is from Hong Kong, and is ethnic Chinese. In the opening credits, she is listed as Jocelyn Packard.

On a show with many mysterious and unpredictable characters, few were more mysterious than Josie Packard. Josie's is the first face we see in the first moments of the pilot. She is seated at a vanity applying her makeup. When Pete Martell bids his wife Catherine Martell goodbye for the morning and is rebuffed, Josie turns around silently, her face pale like a mask, lips red as blood. She observes the sad scene without comment, but with an expression as artfully sad as a painting. Throughout the first season, Josie seems innocent, an easy mark and potential victim for her more savvy and cunning sister in law, Catherine, and Catherine's lover, Ben Horne. It is only later that we learn that Josie is not at all what she seems.

A Chinese native, Josie met Andrew Packard, owner of the Packard Mill, in Hongkong and accompanied him to Twin Peaks as his wife. After Andrew's death in a boating accident, Josie inherited the mill, which however is run by Andrew's sister Catherine Martell. Catherine hates Josie with a passion, resenting the fact that Andrew's death left the mill in non-expert hands and suspecting that that Josie was responsible for Andrew's demise. Catherine's husband, Pete Martell, a former woodcutter, however is good friends with Josie, seeing her fragile side and striving to protect her the entire time he knew her.

After her husband's death, Josie started dating the town sherriff Harry S. Truman. FBI Agent Dale Cooper, in town investigating the murder of Laura Palmer, had befriended Sherriff Truman, and quickly detected Truman's feelings for Josie, but did not himself trust her at all. He tries to warn Truman against trusting Josie too much, but to no avail. At the end of the first season, a mysterious caller shoots Cooper. He survives, thanks to a quick operation, but does not get a look at his assailant, who is later revealed to have been Josie.

Though Josie's English was quite good (despite problems with idioms and turns of phrase), she was taking English lessons from Laura Palmer, right up until the day of Laura's death. (In the non-canonical Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, it is revealed that Laura and Josie were sexual partners as well.) It's implied that Josie's malapropisms and thick accent when speaking with Pete or Harry early in the series are a put-on; when Josie is revealed to be more than meets the eye, she is shown speaking to Ben with perfect English and no trace of an accent.

At first, we see Catherine and Ben Horne conspiring to steal ownership of the mill away from Josie. Later, it was revealed that Josie herself was in fact working with Ben Horne to cut Catharine out of the picture, and that Josie employed Hank Jennings to kill Andrew with Ben's knowledge and complicity. Still later, it was revealed that all the while she was taking orders from Andrew's former business partner and rival, Thomas Eckhardt (David Warner).

In the show's second season, Josie was horrified when both of the men in her life returned. Andrew had not been killed in the boat accident, and now he returned to live with Catherine. The two of them treated Josie as a maid. Eckhardt then arrived in Twin Peaks and ordered Josie to come see him.

On the last night of her life, we see her as we first met her, sitting at a vanity, applying her makeup, and tragically sad and afraid. She considered Eckhardt a dangerous man, and feeling she was going to her death, took a gun with her. Cooper, who had been monitoring Josie discreetly, learns from coat hair fibers found at the scene that it was she who had shot him. He went to the Great Northern to arrest her, followed by Truman. However, they are too late to prevent Josie from killing Eckhardt.

However, Josie suddenly collapsed dead, just moments later, in front of Cooper and a shattered Truman. At the moment of her death, Cooper saw a vision of Bob and the Man from another place. At the autopsy, her body had a dramatic loss in weight. Deputy Hawk speculated that her soul was no longer in the body.

Indeed, it appeared that Josie's soul was trapped within the wood of the hotel. She was mentioned once more when Pete said - at the hotel - "Josie, I see your face."

Due to the show's cancellation, Josie's fate was never resolved.


Casting


According to an interview with Joan Chen in the documentary Secrets from Another Place, included with the 2007 "Gold Box Edition" DVD release of Twin Peaks, the charactor of Josie was originally conceived as an Italian woman named Giovanna (a reproduction of a script page shown on screen during this segment of the documentary indicates "Josie" was intended to be a nickname for Giovanna), and that David Lynch's domestic partner at the time, Isabella Rossellini, was to have played her.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:27:51 am
Quotes:

Pete Martell
•   She's dead. Wrapped in plastic.
o   speaking of finding Laura Palmer's body
•   Fellas, don't drink that coffee! You'd never guess… there was a fish in the percolator.
•   I have no complaints... about the house.
Dale Cooper
•   Diane, I'm holding in my hands a small box of chocolate bunnies.
o   reciting evidence into his ubiquitous tape recorder
•   Damn good coffee!
o   oft-repeated exclamation
•   Harry, my dream is a code waiting to be broken. Break the code, solve the crime.
o   to Sheriff Truman the morning after his bizarre dream
•   This must be where pies go when they die.
o   enjoying a slice of huckleberry pie at the Double-R Diner
•   Harry, I'm gonna let you in on a little secret. Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don't plan it, don't wait for it, just… let it happen.
•   I like my coffee black, like midnight on a moonless night.
Albert Rosenfeld
•   Look, it's trying to think.
o   mocking Sheriff Truman
•   You listen to me. While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a nay-sayer and hatchet man in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I'll gladly take another, because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject absolutely revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method…is love. I love you, Sheriff Truman.
Jerry Horne
•   Brother Ben, we've got two ledgers, and one smoked-cheese pig. Which one do we burn? And it ain't gonna be my pig.
•   Ben… as your attorney, your friend, and your brother… I strongly suggest that you get yourself a better lawyer.
•   We had those Vikings by the horns.
•   Next stop... rocket science!
o   mocking a barmaid who added 1+1 and got 2
Others
•   Blood?!
o   Shelly Johnson, upon finding a shirt in her load of laundry which is soaked in blood
•   She's filled with secrets. Where we're from, the birds sing a pretty song, and there's always music in the air.
o   The Man From Another Place, in Dale Cooper's dream
•   I feel like I know her but sometimes my arms bend back…
o   Laura Palmer, in Dale Cooper's dream
•   Through the darkness of future past, the magician longs to see. One chants out between two worlds: "Fire Walk With Me". We lived among the people — I think you say "convenience store"? We lived above it. I mean it like it is, like it sounds. My name is Mike. His name is BOB.
o   Mike (The One-Armed Man), in Dale Cooper's dream
•   A routine physical examination revealed that I'm sterile. Sure, I thought it meant I didn't have to take a bath, but…
o   Andy Brennan, telling Lucy why he's upset about her news
•   Sheriff Truman? I have Ben Horne on the phone for you. Would you like me to transfer him to you? Well, not him, but his phone call?
o   Lucy Moran
•   The owls are not what they seem.
o   The Giant
•   This is from a long time ago, is that ok? I was about thirteen years old, fourteen maybe. We were going to the roadhouse to meet boys. They're about twenty years old. And they're nice to us. And they make us feel like we're older. Rick asks if we wanna go party and Laura says yes, and all of a sudden I feel this knot building up in my stomach. But when Laura gets in the truck with Rick, I go anyway. A stream in the woods and when I think, it's pale and light out. Laura starts to dance around the boys. She begins to move her hips. And we take off our clothes. I know the boys are watching. Laura starts to kiss Josh and Rick. I don't know what to do, so I swim away. I feel like I want to run, but I don't. He kisses my hand and then me. I can still feel that kiss. His lips are warm and sweet. My heart jumps. He's talking but I can't hear him. It was the first time I ever fell in love.
o   Donna Hayward, telling Harold Smith a story from her past
o   Sampled by the band No-Man for the song "Days In The Trees - Reich" on their album Lovesighs - An Entertainment.
•   By Christmas, that was such a madhouse, there was absolutely no time for paperwork. I simply had to develop a system to remember customer orders using mnemonic triggers. For instance: someone looking for argyle socks, well, that would file under "A" for argyle, subheading "S" for socks. Now, it does get tricky. A request for a vulcanized Macintosh, for instance. Now does that file under "R" for raingear, or "W" for waterproof? My familiarity with the inventory finds me leaning towards an "R".
o   Dick Tremayne
•   What I am trying to make clear is that using a stuffed animal to represent an endangered species as an ecological protest constitutes the supreme incongruity.
o   Dick Tremayne
•   Do you think the furniture in this room is adequately arranged? I have been toying with the notion that if one could find the perfect arrangement of all objects in any particular space it could create a resonance, the benefits to the individual dwelling in that space could be extensive … far reaching.
o   Ben Horne
•   Shut your eyes and you'll burst into flames.
o   The Log Lady
•   See the mountains kiss high Heaven
And the waves clasp one another;
No sister-flower would be forgiven
If it disdained its brother;
And the sunlight clasps the earth,
And the moonbeams kiss the sea -
What is all this sweet work worth
If thou kiss not me?
o   Poem that Windom Earle sent to Audrey Horne, Donna Hayward and Shelly Johnson (from Love's Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelley)
Dialogue
[Cooper is ordering breakfast during his first morning at the Great Northern.]
Dale Cooper: Now, I'd like two eggs, over hard. I know, don't tell me; it's hard on the arteries, but old habits die hard — just about as hard as I want those eggs. Bacon, super-crispy. Almost burned. Cremated. That's great. And, I'll have the grapefruit juice, just as long as those grapefruits…
[He trails off as he sees high school vixen Audrey Horne saunter up to his table.]
Dale Cooper: … are freshly squeezed.
________________________________________
[Pete Martell pours coffee for Dale Cooper and Sheriff Truman.]
Pete Martell: Mr. Cooper, how do you take it?
Dale Cooper: Black as midnight on a moonless night.
Pete Martell: Pretty black.
________________________________________
[FBI pathologist Albert Rosenfield refuses to release Laura's body for the funeral.]
Dr. Hayward: You're the most cold-blooded man I've ever seen! I've never in my life met a man with so little regard for human frailty. Have you no compassion?!
Albert Rosenfield: Oh, I've got compassion running out of my nose, pal! I'm the Sultan of Sentiment! Dr. Hayward, I have travelled thousands of miles and apparently several centuries to this forgotten sinkhole in order to perform a series of tests. Now, I do not ask you to understand these tests. I'm not a cruel man. I just ask you to get the hell outta my way, so I that can finish my work! Is that clear?!
________________________________________
[Cooper has a chat with Albert after the latter was decked by an irate Sheriff Truman.]
Albert Rosenfield: The old rustic sucker-punch, huh? [calling after Truman] A hail of bullets would be nice!
Dale Cooper: That's enough! The sheriff didn't mean anything.
Albert Rosenfield: He hit me!
Dale Cooper: Well, I'm sure he meant to do that.
________________________________________
[Hotel-owner Ben and his brother Jerry discuss a group of Icelandic investors.]
Ben Horne: We've laid in a gala reception for your faired-haired boys tonight. All of Twin Peaks' best and brightest.
Jerry Horne: We're holding it in a phone booth?
________________________________________
[One-Eyed Jack's madam Blackie chats with Cooper and Big Ed, undercover as "Barney" and "Fred".]
Blackie: Fred, what's your line?
Big Ed Hurley: Own a gas station.
[Cooper gives Big Ed a look.]
Big Ed Hurley: Uh-um, I'm an oral surgeon.
Blackie: Well, I've got a Chevy parked out back with a serious root canal problem. Wanna take a look?
Big Ed Hurley: Well, I was hoping you might need a little gum work, 'cause I'd sure like to get a look under your hood.
Blackie: [to Cooper] Mmmm… Fred's okay.
________________________________________
[Sheriff Truman and Lucy visit Cooper in the hospital.]
Sheriff Truman: Lucy… you better bring Agent Cooper up to date.
Lucy Moran: Leo Johnson was shot, Jacques Renault was strangled, the mill burned, Shelly and Pete got smoke inhalation, Catherine and Josie are missing, Nadine is in a coma from taking sleeping pills.
Dale Cooper: How long have I been out?
________________________________________
[Albert is examining Cooper's injuries while he lists the problems of the Twin Peaks case.]
Albert Rosenfield: Meanwhile, one of your principal suspects is killed in his hospital bed, and the other is shot in his living room. You tell me: vigilante justice, or just clean country living?
Dale Cooper: Albert, where does this attitude of general unpleasantness come from?
Albert Rosenfield: I'll have to get back to you on that.
Dale Cooper: Well, if you don't want two black eyes on a regular basis, I suggest you make some kind of peace with the rural life.
Albert Rosenfield: Great. After the square dance, maybe we can all take a hayride.
________________________________________
[Deputy Andy, who recently had a board he stepped on hit him in the face, interrupts Cooper and Albert.]
Dale Cooper: Andy! How's the nose?
Deputy Andy: Not a mark on it! Only blood squirted out.
Albert Rosenfield: Where do they keep his water dish?
. . .
Dale Cooper: Good work, Andy.
Albert Rosenfield: Yeah. Woof.
________________________________________
Albert Rosenfield: I, uh, performed the autopsy on Jacques Renault. Stomach contents revealed… let's see, beer cans, a Maryland license plate, half a bicycle tire, a goat… and a small wooden puppet. Goes by the name of Pinocchio.
Dale Cooper: You're making a joke!
Albert Rosenfield: I like to think of myself as one of the happy generations.
. . .
Albert Rosenfield: Oh, the world's most decrepit room service waiter remembers nothing out of the ordinary about the night in question. No surprise there. Señor Droolcup has, shall we say, a mind that wanders.
________________________________________
Sheriff Truman: So, what did this giant sound like, huh? I mean, did he have a big, booming voice or what?
Dale Cooper: No, no! He spoke softly, distinctly.
Albert Rosenfield: And you gave him the beans you were supposed to use to buy a cow.
Dale Cooper: No, Albert! I gave him my ring.
Albert Rosenfield: Okay. Uh, confining my conclusions to the planet Earth…
________________________________________
[Albert gives his forensic conclusions on an unknown perpetrator.]
Albert Rosenfield: … and he worked with Leo Johnson, currently appearing at Calhoun Memorial Hospital as Mr. Potato Head.
________________________________________
Sheriff Truman: Anything we should be working on?
Albert Rosenfield: Yeah. You might practice walking without dragging your knuckles on the floor. Heh heh heh.
________________________________________
Donna Hayward: There's things you can't get in books.
Harold Smith: There are things you can't get anywhere… but we dream they can be found in other people.
________________________________________
Gordon Cole: COOPER, YOU REMIND ME TODAY OF A SMALL MEXICAN CHIHUAHUA.
________________________________________
[Cooper and Truman question the one-armed man, Mike.]
Dale Cooper: What does Bob want?
Mike, The One-Armed Man: He is Bob, eager for fun. He wears a smile. Everybody run!
________________________________________
[Dale Cooper reads Harold Smith's suicide note.]
Dale Cooper: "J'ai une âme solitaire." I am a lonely soul. Poor guy.
________________________________________
[One-armed man Mike noses around Ben Horne, who's being held for questioning.]
Jerry Horne: Sheriff… no offense, but, eh… clearly, this man's stairs do not reach the attic. Now, your 24 hours are up! You either charge my client or let him go!
Sheriff Truman: Ben Horne, I'm charging you with the murder of Laura Palmer.
Benjamin Horne: Yeah. Good move, Jer!
________________________________________
[Agent Dennis "Denise" Bryson, dressed in drag, confers with Cooper et al.]
"Denise" Bryson: understand we're both staying at the Great Northern. How's the food up there?
Dale Cooper: Denise, you're in for a real surprise.
Sheriff Truman: [to himself] So are they.
________________________________________
[Agent Bryson asks admiringly after the departing Audrey Horne.]
Dale Cooper: Denise, I would assume you're no longer interested in girls.
"Denise" Bryson: Coop, I may be wearing a dress, but I still pull my panties on one leg at a time, if you know what I mean.
Dale Cooper: Not really.
________________________________________
[Albert observes suspended agent-cum-deputy Cooper's plaid shirt and khaki slacks.]
Albert Rosenfield: Oh, Coop, uh, about the uniform…
Dale Cooper: Yes, Albert?
Albert Rosenfield: Replacing the quiet elegance of the dark suit and tie with the casual indifference of these muted earth tones is a form of fashion suicide, but, uh, call me crazy — on you it works.
________________________________________
[Pete, helping Cooper figure out how to outplay evil genius Windom Earle at chess, is interrupted by his "students".]
Lucy Moran: Mr. Martel, Andy moved his knight without doing the little hook thing.
Deputy Andy: You don't have to do the little hook thing; that's optional.
Pete Martell: Andy, uh… the knight has to do the "little hook thing".
Deputy Andy: Every time?
Pete Martell: It's a privilege! No one else gets to make that move.
________________________________________
[Near-deaf FBI boss Gordon Cole and Shelly are sharing a diner booth with Cooper and Annie. As Gordon and Shelly kiss, her boyfriend Bobby walks in.]
Bobby Briggs: Hey! What the hell's going on?
Gordon Cole: YOU ARE WITNESSING A FRONT THREE-QUARTER VIEW OF TWO ADULTS SHARING A TENDER MOMENT. [to Shelly] Acts like he's never seen a kiss before.
Dale Cooper: Uh, Gordon…
Gordon Cole: [to Bobby] TAKE ANOTHER LOOK, SONNY. IT'S GONNA HAPPEN AGAIN!
________________________________________
[Windom Earle has Major Briggs tied up to a giant dartboar.d]
Windom Earle: What is the capital of North Carolina?
Major Briggs: Raleigh.
Windom Earle: Fat load of good that'll do me.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 12, 2007, 02:30:31 am
(http://www.bergen-filmklubb.no/images/Twin_Peaks_Fire_Walk_farger_stor.jpg)

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me can be viewed as both prologue and epilogue to the cult television series Twin Peaks (1990–91), created by Lynch and Mark Frost. It tells of the investigation into the murder of Teresa Banks and the last seven days in the life of Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee), a popular high school student in the small Washington town of Twin Peaks. These two connected murders were the central mysteries of the television series. Thus the film is often called a prequel, but it is not intended to be viewed before the series and also has sequel qualities. Most of the television cast returned for the film, with the notable exceptions of Lara Flynn Boyle who declined to return as Laura’s best friend Donna Hayward (she was replaced by Moira Kelly), and Sherilyn Fenn due to scheduling conflicts. Also, Kyle MacLachlan, who starred as Special Agent Dale Cooper in the TV series, was reluctant to return so his presence in the film is smaller than originally planned.

Fire Walk With Me was greeted at the Cannes Film Festival with booing from the audience and met with almost unanimously negative reviews. The film fared poorly in the United States, partially because it was released almost a year after the television series was canceled (due to a sharp ratings decline in the second season) and partially due to its incomprehensibility to the uninitiated. Many people, especially critics, found the film stylish but bewildering. The film also disappointed many devotees of the TV series due to its darker tone, lack of humor and absence of resolution to the series’ cliff-hanger ending.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 12, 2007, 12:12:09 pm
Twin Peaks Intro and Part 1 (parts 2-6 are there too) First show:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-ht8kywUbc

Cooper's Dream

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMXjjHFz__A

Laura Palmer's Killer Revealed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkgYQFWTtNU&NR=1

Twin Peaks 29-15/15, SERIES FINALE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZccYoNh4dw&NR=1


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:32:14 pm
Nice clips, I just finished watching all the DVDs!  They really brought back memories, the second season, too, has flashes of brilliance.  Are you going to get them?


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:33:36 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5a/FWWM_US_poster.jpg)

Theatrical poster
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Francis Bouygues
Gregg Fienberg
Written by David Lynch
Robert Engels
Starring Sheryl Lee
Moira Kelly
Ray Wise
Dana Ashbrook
Chris Isaak
Kyle MacLachlan
Kiefer Sutherland
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Cinematography Ron Garcia
Editing by Mary Sweeney
Distributed by New Line Cinema
Release date(s) May 1992 (Cannes Film Festival)
Running time 135 minutes
Country  United States
Language English
Budget $10,000,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $4,160,851 (USA)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:36:03 pm
(http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/MG/144248~Twin-Peaks-Fire-Walk-with-Me-Posters.jpg)

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch. The movie title is sometimes given as Fire Walk With Me. In some countries, it was released as Twin Peaks: The Movie. The film can be viewed as both prologue and epilogue to the cult television series Twin Peaks (1990–91), created by Lynch and Mark Frost. It tells of the investigation into the murder of Teresa Banks and the last seven days in the life of Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee), a popular high school student in the small Washington town of Twin Peaks. These two connected murders were the central mysteries of the television series. Thus the film is often called a prequel, but it is not intended to be viewed before the series and also has sequel qualities. Most of the television cast returned for the film, with the notable exceptions of Lara Flynn Boyle who declined to return as Laura’s best friend Donna Hayward (she was replaced by Moira Kelly), and Sherilyn Fenn due to scheduling conflicts. Also, Kyle MacLachlan, who starred as Special Agent Dale Cooper in the TV series, was reluctant to return so his presence in the film is smaller than originally planned.

Fire Walk With Me was greeted at the Cannes Film Festival with booing from the audience and met with almost unanimously negative reviews. The film fared poorly in the United States, partially because it was released almost a year after the television series was canceled (due to a sharp ratings decline in the second season) and partially due to its incomprehensibility to the uninitiated. Many people, especially critics, found the film stylish but bewildering. The film also disappointed many devotees of the TV series due to its darker tone, lack of humor and absence of resolution to the series’ cliff-hanger ending.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:37:23 pm
(http://heim.etherweave.com/weblog/archives/PDVD_046-thumb.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:40:16 pm
(http://www.dvdactive.com/images/reviews/screenshot/2002/4/tpfwwm3.jpg)

The film begins with Gordon Cole calling Agent Chester Desmond about the mysterious murder of Teresa Banks. He then is introduced to his new partner, Sam Stanley. They then receive clues fom Lil the dancer. The murder is coded as a "Blue Rose Case". They go to the sheriff's department where the body of Teresa Banks is kept in the morgue. Agent Desmond forces them to let Chester and Stanley see the body; as they inspect it, they realize that her ring is missing. Stanley realizes that there is a letter "T" placed under her fingernail. The two go to the diner where she worked, and discover the clue that Teresa's left arm has been weird lately. Later, the two go to Fat Trout Trailer Park where Teresa stayed, and the owner Carl helps Chester and Sam find the trailer. Suddenly, he becomes bewildered by an electric pole. Teresa Bank's body is sent back to Portland, and as Agent Desmond he returns to the trailer park, a beeping noise is heard. He looks under the Chalfont/Tremond trailer, picks up Teresa's ring, and vanishes.

Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Agent Dale Cooper informs Gordon about the dream he saw where long lost Agent Phillip Jeffries re-appears. As Cooper looks at a security camera, Agent Jeffries appears out of nowhere, like in Cooper's dream. Agent Jeffries insanely tells Gordon that he was in a nightmare. While he explains all those things, we see images of the Man From Another Place, BOB and Mrs. Chalfont and her grandson in a room. As the Black Lodge appears, they go in. As Jeffries is explaining, he disappears into thin air. Due to Chester's disappearance, Cooper is sent to investigate. He goes to the trailer park to find a missing trailer (owned by Mrs. Chalfont and her grandson), seeing the words "Let's Rock" (words said by the Man From Another Place in the 25 years later dream from the series) on Chester's car's windshield. The clues to Teresa Banks' murder lead to a dead end.

One year later in Twin Peaks, Laura Palmer and Donna Hayward go to school, where Laura does drugs and makes out with James Hurley. After school, Laura talks with Donna about the difference between Bobby Briggs and James Hurley. As Laura takes out her secret diary, she realizes that there are pages missing. She goes to Harold Smith's house, and tells him about the torn out pages, saying that BOB did it and getting mad at Harold for not believing in BOB. Laura decides to let Harold hold on to her secret diary. Meanwhile, Agent Cooper tells Agent Rosenfield that he believes the killer will strike again.

On her Meals on Wheels round, Laura sees Mrs. Chalfont and her grandson. Mrs Chalfont gives Laura a painting and informs Laura that the "man behind the mask" is in Laura's room. Laura lets Shelly deliver the Meals on Wheels and returns home, where she seems to be alone, but as she goes inside her room she sees BOB. As she goes outside, Leland, her father, comes out. Laura refuses the facts. When the Palmer family is about to eat, Leland starts insanely complain that Laura didn't wash her hands and about the necklace she got from James. About to go to bed, she hangs the painting she got from Mrs. Chalfont.

She dreams about Cooper entering the Black Lodge and the Man From Another Place telling Cooper that he sounds like a beeping noise (the noise heard when Chester Desmond entered the Trailer Park). He shows Cooper the ring that Teresa Banks had, and Cooper tells Laura not to take the ring. She wakes up to find a bloody Annie Blackburn next to her in bed. She tells her that Cooper is trapped in the Black Lodge and he can't get out. She then disappears and Laura finds the ring in her hand. She then re-awakes. Meanwhile, Bobby, Leo and Jacques Renault are talking about drug scores.

Laura is ready to go to the Bang Bang Bar and Donna wants to come, but Laura doesn't let her. As Laura is about to go in, she encounters the Log Lady and she tells her something mysterious. Inside the bar, Jacques introduces Laura to two rednecks. They're about to go to One Eyed Jack to have sex, but Donna appears and wants to come too; impressed by her kiss, they let her. At One Eyed Jack's, Laura has sex then discusses Teresa Banks's murder with Ronette Pulaski. Laura witnesses Donna have sex then takes her home. The next morning, Donna wakes up and Laura tells Donna that she doesn't want her to become like Laura.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:43:59 pm

(http://www.davidlynch.de/cf3.jpg)

Leland arrives as Leland and takes Laura home. But suddenly Phillip Gerard, A.K.A Mike, approaches Leland and Laura and the familiar beeping sound is heard. Mike shouts madly at Leland, accusing him of stealing his "corn" and he shows Laura Teresa's ring. Traumatized by the confrontation, Leland pulls into a gas station parking lot to gather his wits. He then recalls his affair with Teresa and murdering her. Laura finally realizes that the ring she saw was the same one from her dream. The next night, Laura and Bobby take some **** in the woods and Jacques sends a drug messenger carrying an enormous amount of ****. The messenger takes out a gun, but Bobby shoots him in return. Laura starts laughing, angering Bobby.

The morning after, James is worried about Laura taking too many drugs, but since Leland is watching, she has to go. That night, BOB comes through Laura's window and starts raping her. She asks him who he is and it seems to be Leland. Laura becomes scared of Leland and tells him to stay away. Due to the effect of the drugs, Laura can't concentrate at school. Later, Bobby wants to have sex with Laura, but she refuses and he finally realizes that Laura was using him to get the ****. The angel in her painting disappears.

James and Laura go to the woods and start to make out, but she tells James the Laura he knows is gone. She asks him to just leave her near the woods. Laura meets Ronette, Jacques and Leo and they have sex with each other in a cabin; Leland watches them from outside. Jacques wants to have harder sex and he ties Laura up. After he is done with her, he goes outside, where Leland attacks him. Leo then emerges, sees Jacques lying unconscious and bloody, and flees the scene in panic. Leland then takes both Laura and Ronette to the train car.

Meanwhile, Mike, the one armed man realizes that BOB/Leland is about to kill again and chases after him. BOB/Leland takes a mirror says he will kill Laura if he won't let him inside her. An angel appears in front of Ronette and she tries to escape. As Mike opens the train car door, Ronette tries to escape, but Leland beats her and she falls outside; in the process, Mike drops Teresa's ring. When BOB realizes that he can't enter Laura anymore, he stabs her to death.

As Laura's body is drifting away, BOB/Leland enters the Black Lodge. Mike and the Man From Another Place are there. They tell BOB that they want their Garmonbozia (the corn Mike was talking about earlier during the road rage). BOB returns it as blood. As Laura's body is found, she enters the Black Lodge. She realizes that Cooper is by her side and her angel is guarding her.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:48:52 pm
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7f/Fwwm1.jpg)

Sheryl Lee as Laura Palmer, Ray Wise as Leland Palmer and Grace Zabriskie as Sarah Palmer.


Twin Peaks had only been cancelled for a month when it was announced that David Lynch would be making a movie with French company CIBY-2000 financing what would be the first film of a three-picture deal. However, on July 11, 1991, Ken Scherer, CEO of Lynch/Frost productions, announced that the film was not going to be made because series star Kyle MacLachlan did not want to reprise his role of Special Agent Dale Cooper. A month later, MacLachlan had changed his mind and the film was back on albeit without series regulars Lara Flynn Boyle and Sherilyn Fenn due to scheduling conflicts. In a 1995 interview, Fenn revealed that the real reason she didn’t do the film was that she "was extremely disappointed in the way the second season got off track. As far as Fire Walk With Me, it was something that I chose not to be a part of." Fenn’s character was cut from the script and Boyle was recast with Moira Kelly. Even though MacLachlan agreed to be in the film, he only wanted a smaller role, forcing Lynch and co-writer Robert Engels to re-write the screenplay so that Agent Chester Desmond investigated the murder of Theresa Banks and not Agent Cooper as originally planned. MacLachlan also resented what had happened during the second season of the show. "David and Mark were only around for the first season...I think we all felt a little abandoned. So I was fairly resentful when the film, Fire Walk With Me, came around." He ended up only working five days on the movie. The relationship between Lynch and Mark Frost had become strained during the second season and after the series ended, he went on to direct his own movie, Storyville, and was unable to collaborate with Lynch on Fire Walk With Me.

Lynch decided to make a Twin Peaks movie because, as he said in an interview, "I couldn’t get myself to leave the world of Twin Peaks. I was in love with the character of Laura Palmer and her contradictions: radiant on the surface but dying inside. I wanted to see her live, move and talk." Actress Sheryl Lee also echoed these sentiments. "I never got to be Laura alive, just in flashbacks, it allowed me to come full circle with the character." According to Lynch, the movie was about, "the loneliness, shame, guilt, confusion and devastation of the victim of incest. It also dealt with the torment of the father – the war in him." Filming began on September 5, 1991 in Snoqualmie, Washington and lasted until October of the same year, with four weeks dedicated to locations in Washington, and another four weeks of interiors and additional locations in Los Angeles.

When shooting went over schedule in Seattle, Laura's death in the train car had to be shot in L.A. on soundstage during the last day of shooting, October 31.




Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:52:40 pm
(http://www.dvdtimes.co.uk/protectedimage.php?image=NoelMegahey/twinpeaksfwwm5.jpg)

Fire Walk With Me was greeted at the Cannes Film Festival with booing from the audience and met with almost unanimously negative reviews. Even the CIBY-2000 party at Cannes did not go well. According to Lynch, Francis Bouygues (then head of CIBY) was not well liked in France and this only added to the film’s demise at the festival. The film flopped in the United States, partially because it was released almost a year after the television series was cancelled (due to a sharp ratings decline in the second season) and partially due to its incomprehensibility to the uninitiated. Many people, especially critics, found the film stylish but bewildering. Janet Maslin in her review for the New York Times wrote, "Mr. Lynch’s taste for brain-dead grotesque has lost its novelty." Fellow Times film critic Vincent Canby concurred, "It's not the worst movie ever made; it just seems to be." In his review for Variety magazine, Todd McCarthy said, "that Laura Palmer, after all the talk, is not a very interesting or compelling character and long before the climax has become a tiresome teenager." The film also disappointed many devotees of the TV series due to its darker tone, lack of humor and absence of resolution to the series’ cliff-hanger ending.

U.S. distributor New Line Cinema released the film in America on August 28, 1992 with no advanced press screenings which did not endear it with critics. However, Kim Newman gave the film one of its rare positive reviews in Sight & Sound magazine. "The film’s many moments of horror...demonstrate just how tidy, conventional and domesticated the generic horror movie of the 1980s and 1990s has become." In its opening weekend, Fire Walk With Me grossed a total of $1,813,559 in 691 theaters. As of April 3, 2007, the film has grossed a total of $4,160,851 in North America.

According to the film’s cinematographer, Ron Garcia, the film was very popular in Japan -- in particular, with women, as Martha Nochimson wrote in her book on Lynch's movies, "He surmises that the enthusiasm of the Japanese women comes from a gratification of seeing in Laura some acknowledgment of their suffering in a repressive society." In retrospect, Lynch felt bad that the film "did no business and that a lot of people hate the film. I really like the film. But it had a lot of baggage with it." The film’s editor Mary Sweeney said, "They so badly wanted it to be like the T.V. show, and it wasn’t. It was a David Lynch feature. And people were very angry about it. They felt betrayed." Lee is very proud of the film, saying, "I have had many people, victims of incest, approach me since the film was released, so glad that it had been made because it helped them to release a lot."

After Fire Walk with Me was released, Lynch reportedly planned a second prequel, possibly utilizing footage edited out of the first movie. However, in a 2001 interview he said that the Twin Peaks franchise is “dead as a doornail.”

Fire Walk With Me holds a 59 percent "fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes.



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:54:33 pm
(http://media.outnow.ch/Movies/Images/1992/TwinPeaks-FireWalkWithMe/dvd-film.ws/15.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 10:55:26 pm

(http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g106/meandhell/DavidLynch.jpg)

Director David Lynch originally shot about five hours of footage that was subsequently cut down to two hours and fifteen minutes. This missing footage is wanted by many Twin Peaks fans. The footage nearly appeared on New Line's Special Edition DVD in 2002 but was nixed over budget and running time concerns. In 2002, a French company called MK2 began negotiations with Lynch to include the missing scenes, properly edited and scored, in an upcoming Special Edition DVD. This has yet to appear. Most of the deleted scenes feature additional characters from the television series who ultimately did not appear in the finished film.

Recently, dvdrama.com reported that French distributor company MK2 is in final negotiations with Lynch about a new two-disc Special Edition that would include 17 deleted scenes hand-picked by the director himself. Tentatively scheduled for release date on October 17th, 2007, once again, MK2 has delayed the release of the deleted scenes and will re-release another bare bones edition of Fire Walk With Me. It is undetermined as to whether MK2 will go forward with a DVD release including deleted scenes at this time.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:04:16 pm
halloffame david lynch, weird on top...
 

From Eraserhead to Blue Velvet to Mulholland [Drive],

what he really wants to do is to dissect...
[/i]

(http://www.davidlynch.de/empires.jpg)


Words: David Hughes  // Portrait: Alaister Thain
 
The way David Lynch`s mind works is God`s own private mystery. Interviewing the man Mel Brooks once (accurately) described as "Jimmy Stewart from Mars" is like driving on a lost highway at night, somewhere in the American West, when suddenly you pull up into a gas station where instead of pumps you find a jukebox, a dwarf and a column of fire. You are just about to remark upon this to the pump attendant, who is unwisely smoking as he siphons petrol out of your car, when he suddenly anounces, in a voice too loud for this earth, "You know, I`ve really been getting into snooker!" David Lynch has always been a mass of contradictions.
A polite, well-spoken and mild-mannered 'Gee, whizz' Eagle Scout from Missoula, Montana, Lynch somehow transmuted an idyllic childhood of blue skies, green lawns and white picket fences into the kind of art which doesn`t just turn heads, but stomaches as well. From early works like The Amputee, The Grandmother and Eraserhead, through Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart and smallscreen phenomenon Twin Peaks, Lynch`s oeuvre is filled with indelible images, unforgettable characters and disturbing elements, best exemplified by the line the late Pauline Kael overheard from someone who had just seen Blue Velvet: "Maybe I`m sick, but I want to see that again."

Meeting David Lynch, in the suitably Lynchian city of Prague - Franz Kafka`s hometown - certainly fulfills expectations. His improbably quiffed grey hair looks like it has been slept in by three different people, his tie-less shirt is customarily buttoned to the neck.("I don`t like wind on my collarbone, " he explains of the fashion trend he set in the `70s), and his voice is pure Gordon Cole, the shouty FBI chief Lynch played in Twin Peaks. Unlike most Empire Hall of Fame candidates, Lynch arrives five hours early for our interview, informing most of Prague that. "WE COULD DO THE INTERVIEW NOW IF YOU WANT, BUT WE HAVE TO DO IT IN THE BAR. `CAUSE I`M A SMOKER, SEE?" Indeed, during the next two-and-a-half hours of short sentences and long silences, Lynch will smoke his way through most of a pack of American Spirits, pausing only to nibble a cheese sandwich - cherry pie not being indigenous to the Czech capital - and slug back - what else? - a cup of damn fine coffee.

It has been difficult for David Lynch to make films. The making of his first feature, Eraserhead, stretched over four years, plagued by a variety of problems, most of which had to do with money. The making of his latest feature, Mulholland Drive, took almost as long, but or entirely different reasons - it began as a pilot for a TV series, was hated and shelved by the same network that found success with Twin Peaks, then bough and revived by Canal Plus, and finally finished off as a feature which won Lynch the Best Director prize at this year`s Cannes Film Festival. The problem tends to be that, despite being acclaimed as one of America`s most stylish and avant-garde directors, Lynch has never enjoyed commercial success anywhere but the small screen. Eraserhead was an underground success with a strong (though often retrospective) critical response; The Elephant Man and Blue Velvet received multiple Academy Award nominations, but were only modestly successful; the critically-reviled Wild at Heart found an audience in some territories and won Lynch the coveted Plame d`Or in Cannes; Lynch`s other films - including Dune, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. Lost Highway and the lovable The Straight Story - were flops.

His films have also courted controversy. Both Eraserhead and Blue Velvet were dismissed as 'sick' by some critics, the latter earning a knee-jerk reaction from feminists who object to the characterisation of Dorothy (unflinchingly played by Lynch`s then girlfriend, Isabella Rossellini) as a masochist; the quart-into-a-pint-pot  adaptation of Dune outraged the book`s legion of fans, a fate which also befell the Twin Peaks movie; Wild at Heart was rendered more mild by censors; Lost Highway was described as exploitative in many quarters - and if the lesbian scenes in Mulholland Drive don`t attract the same criticism, the film`s dreamlogic and abstract denouement may well prove to be its undoing, notwithstanding its growing critical reputation. Although Dune was a disappointment, Lynch was most hurt by the accusations of misogyny. "People have an idea that Dorothy was Everywoman, instead of just being Dorothy," he has said. "If it`s just Dorothy, and it`s her story - which it is to me - then everything is fine. If Dorothy is Everywoman, it doesn`t make any sense... It`s completely false, and they`d be right to be upset. When you start talking about 'women' versus 'a woman', then you`re getting into this area of generalisation, and you can`t win. There is no generalisation. There`s a billion different stories and possibilities."

You once said that Eraserhead was perfect. Do you still feel that way?

No, it was just that day. I might`ve been very relaxed, and it was a long time ago, and it just struck me as, y`know, perfect. Nothing is perfect. You can shoot for it - you`ve gotta shoot for it - but there`s no such thing as a perfect film.

Stanley Kubrick screened Eraserhead for the cast and crew of The Shining, because that was the mood he wanted to achieve. Are you a Kubrick fan?

I love The Shining. If I see it on TV, no matter what else is on, I have to watch it. It just gets better and better. And yet, when it cameout, it didn`t make that  much of a noise. But that`s the way it always was with Kubrick`s stuff. It`s pretty amazing how they grow. But I like everything he`s done. I love Barry Lyndon - it`s a great, great film.

There`s a rumour you once considered remaking Lolita, with John Hurt or Anthony Hopkins as Humbert Humbert.

Total baloney. Why remake a perfect film? One of my all-time favourites? a classic? Nobody can touch it. When [Adrian Lyne] did it, it was a joke. I refused to see it.

Anthony Hopkins has admitted he gave you a hard time on The Elephant Man, because he thought you were unsure of yourself.

(Ninety-second pause) I would never say anything about those kinds of things.

With The Elephant Man and The Straight Story, was it more important for you to capture the essence of the true story than the literal truth of the story?

Oh, yeah. It`s true of any true story. The essence is the stuff, and the essence holds the little micro-particles that dictate the action and the thing that drives it. You`ve got to be true to the essence of it.

Was that true of your stalled Marilyn Monroe project, Goddess, based on Anthony Summer`s book?

I don`t know what would have happened if  had directed that. But when we said to the people in the studio who we thought killed her, they didn`t want any part of it. It was an interesting thing to think about, but nobody knows. Well, a couple of people know.

In effect, though, you and Mark Frost 'stole from the corpse' with Twin Peaks - the beautiful girl with a dark side...

Well, it`s a phenomenon that`s not just Marilyn Monroe - there`s a lot of girls like that, it`s human nature. But I think that whatever it was about Twin Peaks and Marilyn Monroe, that was a thing, you know, that - speaking for me - I was real interested in.

You acted in Dune and Twin Peaks, but you haven`t done much lately. Why is that?

Twin Peaks is my best work [as an actor]. It wasn`t gonna be a character at all, but there`s a scene where Kyle - Agent Cooper - talks to his boss, and the character was born because I needed to have him to talk to somebody, so I did the voice that he talked to, and I talked loud `cause sometimes I talk loud on the phone, so it just happened like that. And then it became a character. It was really fun. And also the mood on the set of Twin Peaks - at least from my point of view; I wasn`t there when others were working - was so fantastic, so there was a lot of experimenting and a lot of goodwill, a great working atmosphere.

You fell out with Kyle MacLachlan over his and the Twin Peaks` cast sense of abandonment during the second series, which is why Chris Isaak took the principle role in Fire Walk With Me.

(pauses to smoke entire cigarette) Kyle is a good guy, and I wouldn`t like to say anything about that. Kyle`s my neighbour, he`s a really great person, but, you know, when you`re in a TV show, the first year is golden, and the second year, things get strange, and Twin Peaks was no exception.

Were you disappointed you couldn`t have more of Dale Cooper in Fire Walk With Me?

I love restrictions, and I believe in fate. So, what he did worked out just fine.

Are you pleased that Fire Walk With Me, almost universally panned on its release - except, notably, by Empire - is enjoying a critical reappraisal?

Yes, because I love that film, and I say now that The Straight Story is my most experimental movie, but up `til then, Fire Walk With Me was my most experimental fim, and some of the things, you know, sequences... There`s such a magic to just the word  'sequence', I`m not kidding ya. There`s something about the word 'sequence', it`s what I`m fixated on now. And it`s just the whole power of everything.

Could you explain that a little better?

No.

Critics are notoriously fickle, but were you surprised Peaks fans didn`t like the movie?

Not really. There was a shift going on, and who knows all the reasons, but it was just in the air. It was unfortunate, but... And also, it was a dark film, and it was too much in people`s faces and didn`t have the humour of Twin Peaks. It was what it was supposed to be, but it wasn`t what people wanted. It was supposed to be stand-alone, but also the last week of Laura Palmer`s life. All those things had been established, but they could be pleasant on one level to experience, but on another level, not.

Would you ever go back to Twin Peaks?

No. Uh-uh. It`s as dead as a doornail.

Did you get the sense - after the triple-threat of Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart and Twin Peaks - that whatever you made next, the critics would slate?

When you go up, you gotta go down, and I think it happens to everybody.

How do you feel when your films are 'gutted' by the censors? Wild at Heart was cut, as was Blue Velvet...

Those were cuts I didn`t wanna make. They told me if I didn`t want an X I had to take out one hitfrom Frank onto Dorothy. And now you see the beginning of it, Jeffrey in the closet looking out and you hear it, and it`s way worse than it was because your mind kicks in.

But didn`t you cut Wild at Heart yourself after people left the test screenings?

We had three test screenings of Wild at Heart, and only when I cut one tiny part did people stay in the theatre. Well, a lot of people stayed, but about half left, usually. I`ve been very lucky on every film except Dune, that what you see is the director´s cut - except for censorship, I`ve never had to make any changes that I didn`t wanna make.

Do the external forces acting on your work - release dates, studios - frustrate you?

(pauses to order and drink third cup of coffee) See, there`s the doughnut and there`s the hole. The doughnut is the film. The hole is all the things you`re talking about, so they say, "Keep your eye on the doughnut, not the hole." And the doughnut is so much better than the hole, so it`s not that hard to do. There`s never any outside force that keeps you from making the film the way it wants to be. If there is, you should stop. You always think you`re gonna get it into Cannes, but if [it`s] at the expense o fthe film, then you`ll hurt the film and kill yourself.

You found it hard to get backing for another film after Blue Velvet, unable to get either One Saliva Bubble or Ronnie Rocket off the ground.

Yeah. Blue Velvet made money, but it wasn`t the kind of film that had studios calling [me] to do somethin for them. And I was with Dino [De Laurentiis], he bankrolled One Saliva Bubble, and we were gonna shoot it (with Steve Martin and Martin Short). We scouted locations, then Dino`s company went bankrupt.

 One Saliva Bubble was one of many comedy projects you never made. Can you tell me about the others?

With The Lemurians, it was the idea that Lemuria sunk, like Atlantis, and the essence of Lemuria began to leak because Jacques Cousteau bumped something on his explorations and caused a leakage of "essence of Lemuria". And this essence worked its way and did certain things. It was a comedy and pretty absurd, but it never got anywhere. But it made us laugh. The Dream Of The Bovine was for the comedy channel. [Robert Engels] and I wrote three episodes, and then sort of realised that it was a feature, but in re-writes it got off-track. And then I re-read some parts of the original, and there`s defiitely something there, but it needs a lot of work. It should be very bad quality, whatever it is. Extremely bad quality. Which is not hard to do.

Are you frustrated at not being able to make comedies, at least so far?

I really have a respect for comedy. People have said comedy is like mathematics: two and two is four; this and this; you gotta get a laugh. And it`s really difficult, and yet comedies are throwaway things.

You`re a big fan of Jacques Tati, but what contemporary comedy have you enjoyed?

Something About Mary - all the dog bits. I like that. And I like the guy with the crutches who tried to get his keys - that physical gag, I thought that was really, really good, the timing of what he did, and the little sound effect they put in there. I thought he did a really good job.

Lee Evans.

Is that his name? He`s really good. And I liked the dog stuff a lot.

What other films have you liked recently?

I haven`t seen that much. I`m not really a film buff, I like to work on my own stuff. Not that something doesn`t exist that I would really like - I just haven`t seen it.

Well, let`s talk about Mulholland Drive. When they shelved the pilot, did ABC simply not 'get' what you were trying to do?

They hated it. They hated the story, the acting. They thought it was too slow, that`s for sure. Basically they hated verything about it.

You started writing it with Joyce Eliason, who scripted The Last Don...

Right. I started, though, way before that, when it was gonna be kind of a spin-off of Twin Peaks, but it didn`t go anywhere. And just the words 'Mulholland Drive' always got something going, but I never knew what, so all the times it started to go, it never really went, until this last thing. And then it wasnothing but trouble with ABC, and it was just more fuel for the [theory] that a thing is not finished until it`s finished.. It wants to be a certain way, and you don`t know all the twists and turns in a road that are coming up - you just drive dow the road and, you know, pay attention.

Like Mulholland Drive itself - the road and the film. Did you predict that the outcome of the whole ABC/shelved pilot fiasco would be a happy one, an award in Cannes and a strong critical response?

When you`re in the middle of something, it`s not impossible to let go of [it], but it`s an injury if you don`t finish something, and part of your mind is always going back to it if it`s not finished. So I don`t know whether it was being hopeful, or I had a feeling, but many people involved in the project had feelings that it wasn`t gonna die. Then it got revived and almost died, and revived and died many, many times. Because of the nature of it, I don`t know how to say it, but it would be like there`s a key to something - your brain kind of kicks in to finish something, and you don`t know how it`s going to end. It`s pretty interesting how the mind can go to work, and ideas come in. It`s a real interesting experience.

The only explanation you ever gave for Lost Highway was that it is a "psychogenic fugue". Would you care to elaborate on that a little?

No. I think it`s [a] beautiful [phrase], even if it didn`t mean anything. It has music and it has a certain force and dreamlike quality. I think they call it a "psychogenic fugue" because it goes from one thing, segues to another, and then I think it comes back again. And so it is [in] Lost Highway.

Is it necessary that you understand seomething if you`re going to film it?

No, not one bit. The reverse is true. My understanding of Wild at Heart, the book... Again, it was a lot like The Elephant Man - the essence was Sailor and Lula, and many things were one line, or one paragraph, or one thing that shot a bunch of studio stuff into me that got expanded. Some things were dropped, but it`s like they triggered [other] things. But then at a certain point you have to go and make it your own.

Your first two features were in black and white, and rumour has it you initially considered shooting Lost Highway in monochrome, to heighten the film noir sensibility.

No.Some films are black and white films and some films are colour films. They tell you pretty much straightaway. I love black and white, but Lost Highway wouldn`t work in black and white, just like The Elephant Man wouldn`t work in colour.

You know your ad for PlayStation 2 is black and white...

No it`s not.

Yes it is. You filmed it in colour, but it was only shown in black and white.

Really?

Really. How do you feel about that?

I do not feel good. It`s supposed to be in colour. You see, there`s a total disregard... Once they have it, they do what they want. And if that happened in film, then I`d have to quit making films.

There are university courses taught, and academic texts published, about the deeper meanings of Twin Peaks and Lost Highway. Why do you think that is?

Human beings are detectives, and mysteries are magnets, and once you discover something, the mystery`s over. And I think that some knowing is completely fulfilling, but most knowing you`re just onto the next thing, and it`s done. It`s like me; I wanna know where things go, but we can all maybe get to maybe a different place, but a very satisfying place. And you`re not very sure of the place, but it`s still very lively.

 

// Mulholland Drive will be released in January 2002, and reviewed in the February 2002 issue. The Complete Lynch by David Hughes is currently available to buy, priced 15.99 pounds.     
 
http://www.davidlynch.de/empire2001.html


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:10:46 pm
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992)
August 29, 1992
Review/Film; One Long Last Gasp For Laura Palmer


By VINCENT CANBY
Published: August 29, 1992


Everything about David Lynch's "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" is a deception. It's not the worst movie ever made; it just seems to be. Its 134 minutes induce a state of simulated brain death, an effect as easily attained in half the time by staring at the blinking lights on a Christmas tree.


The film, which opened yesterday, was put together for hard-core fans of the "Twin Peaks" television series, that is, for people so crackers over the show that they will pretend they don't know who killed Laura Palmer. Most others, including those who don't care, won't go to see the movie anyway.

Having already told the story of Laura Palmer's decline and fall in flashbacks, Mr. Lynch and Robert Engels, who collaborated with him on the screenplay, now elect to tell the same story more or less chronologically. Some characters from the television series appear in the film. Many do not. There are also a lot of new characters. The presence of some may be justified by the fact that they are phantoms, though of whose mind is never clear.

The awful truth about "Fire Walk With Me" is that Mr. Lynch is again plumbing the modest depths of the same kind of surrealism that looked fresher and funnier in his first film, "Eraserhead." Characters are introduced and disappear for no special reason, not even mystical. It seems more likely that actors of the caliber of Kieffer Sutherland and David Bowie could spend only a limited amount of time on the picture, and that Mr. Lynch accommodated them and himself by introducing into the script intimations of the occult. He can't get off the hook that easily.

At one point he would certify his surrealist credentials by showing a quick image of a white horse standing patiently in Laura Palmer's living room. This could be a quote from something by Luis Bunuel, but it would make as much sense inserted into a segment of "Golden Girls."

The director's imagination is on hold in "Fire Walk With Me." The film starts off with the murder of Teresa Banks (Pamela Gidley), a young woman whose death foretells the fate of Laura Palmer, the beautiful high-school student who, as played Sheryl Lee, looks to be approaching her mid-30's. Poor ****-sniffing Laura never learned how to just say no.

At the film's beginning, Mr. Lynch makes a large cameo appearance as a F.B.I. agent who shouts a lot because he's deaf, and who sees in the death of Teresa Banks intimations of civilization's mortality. He assigns to the case two oddball agents, played by Mr. Sutherland and Chris Isaak, who vanish early on, to be replaced by good old Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan), who seems to be visiting this movie on his day off from the production of another.

Harry Dean Stanton comes on a couple of times as the bewildered manager of the Fat Trout Motor Court, not far from the town of Twin Peaks. Most of the movie is occupied by showing Laura's increasing hysteria as she tries to score more ****, to pacify her various boyfriends and to make sense of obscene daymares involving her dad (Ray Wise).

Because of the director's repeated use of long, lingering lap-dissolves, in which the images of one scene remain on the screen beneath the images of the succeeding scene, the film appears to be an undifferentiated mess of story lines and hallucinations. There's no reason to care which is which. Even Mr. Lynch's eccentric touches become boring. The jokes are stillborn.

"Fire Walk With Me" glazes the eyes and the mind. Twin Peaks Fire Walk With Me

Directed by David Lynch; written by Mr. Lynch and Robert Engels; director of photography, Ron Garcia; edited by Mary Sweeney; music by Angelo Badalamenti; production designer, Patricia Norris; produced by Gregg Fienberg; released by New Line Cinema. Running time: 134 minutes. This film is rated R. Laura Palmer . . . Sheryl Lee Leland Palmer . . . Ray Wise Special Agent Dale Cooper . . . Kyle MacLachlan Special Agent Chester Desmond . . . Chris Isaak Donna Hayward . . . Moira Kelly Carl Rodd . . . Harry Dean Stanton Phillip Jeffries . . . David Bowie "Fire Walk With Me," which has been rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian), has partial nudity, sexual situations and vulgar language.


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:13:58 pm
The Fire Walkers of Twin Peaks
When David Lynch´s bizarre TV show leaped to the big screen, these actors survived the transition.


By Anthony C. Ferrante

Through the darkness of futures past,
the magician longs to see
Once chance out,
between two worlds,
fire walk with me.


Those word echoed from television screens in 1990 and directly preceded the introduction of BOB (Frank Silva), Twin Peaks´ mysterious woodland entity, who was one of the many metaphysical links to the death of homecoming queen Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). And, like any upstanding incarnation of evil, BOB has become ingrained in America´s consciousness. With long, stringy hair and stubbly beard, BOB freaked out audiences with his maniacal grin and subtle way of working his seeds of depravity into the kindest of hearts.

If every demon has his day, then BOB`s has arrived this year. No longer is his presence confined to the small screen: he´s competing in the big leagues now that David Lynch´s TV sensation has become Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, a theatrical prequel to the beloved cult series currently in release from New Line Cinema.

"The thing I love about playing BOB is that it´s primal therapy," says Frank Silva, the man behind the maniac. "You would think that after doing all those horrible things, you´d be shaking and all wrapped up in it, but it was the total opposite for me. It was like going into the playpen. And I would feel so relaxed and so calm after getting all that crap out and having an excuse - that´s the best way of doing something.

"One of the ideas for this movie´s trailer was to have the camera crawling around the ground in the forest," Silva continues. "Finally, it comes upon something you can´t quite figure out. You kind of see a jean jacket and then a back and this hair. Then the camera quickly moves over the shoulder, looking down at this hand scraping out Laura in the ground. Finally, the camera tracks off into the trees with the wind."

Fire Walk With Me begins a year and a week before Laura Palmer´s vicious murder, when the body of Theresa Banks is found floating in Washington´s Wind River. Enter straight-laced agent Chester Desmond (Chris Isaak), who´s assigned to the case and discovers that enigmas are only in the eye of the beholder. "I consider myself the lead character, but no one else did," says rocker and part-time actor Isaak, whose other credits include a cameo appearance in Silence of the Lambs and a big part in the 1978 Japanese sci-fi epic Message from Space.

But fans don´t have to worry that agent Cooper has been replaced. Agent Desmond is just one of many FBI operatives making the Peaks rounds this time out. There are the traditional mainstays of Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan), agent Albert Rosenfeld (Miguel Ferrer) and bureau chief Gordon Cole (Lynch himself), with backup from such new faces as Kiefer Sutherland´s agent Sam Stanley and David Bowie´s apparent time-traveling agent Phillip Jeffries.

"Everybody else has the quirks," admits Isaak, who tends to be a little hard on his own acting abilities. "There´s a scene Kiefer and I did with Harry Dean Stanton playing a trailer park owner. Harry had worked himself up and was crying. Real tears were running down his face, and that really brings you to attention when you´re doing a scene. For me the uninitiated, it was like, 'Wow, what´s he doing? He´s acting, Chris, as opposed to you, who´s reading his lines like a cardboard cut-out.'"

With all this FBI action floating around, only the bare essentials are left for the rest of the Peaks regulars. Jumping forward a year later, the film uncovers all of the juicy sexual deploits and entanglements with the dark side that eventually led to Laura Palmer´s untimely demise. And as this is a motion picture and not TV, the new Peaks pushes much further than the series ever dared.

"It would be fair to say that this is a no-holds-barred version of the mess of a young girl can get into in high school, which seems like a safe and secure position in life," says Grace (Servants of Twilight) Zabriskie, who portrays Laura´s psychic mom, Sarah. Returning to play the character was particularly intriguing for Zabriskie, since she got a chance to explore a different side of Sarah - a part which existed in the time-frame before the TV show began.

"Basically, I had to show what a normal life was before tragedy struck," explains Zabriskie. "On the show, my character became sort of a study in denial and repression. It´s about the fact that when things are really going wrong in a family no one wants to admit it, which causes a lot of strange behaviour."

In addition to Lee as Laura, other returning actors include James Marshall as her rebel girlfriend James Hurley and Ray Wise as her father, Leland. Moira Kelly replaces Lara Flynn Boyle (who had prior acting commitments) as Donna Hayward, Laura´s best friend.

"When you´ve already had a good actress in a role and nobody really complains about the replacement - that´s amazing," notes Zabriskie of Kelly´s work. "It´s a different Donna," adds Silva. "The only way for another actor to step into an established role is probably what Moira did: to go in and tackle it in a whole different style and give a totally different interpretation."

As for the rest of the Peaks regulars, suspiciously absent are Sherilyn (Meridian) Fenn as Audrey Horne and Richard Beymer  as her father, Benjamin - though rumour has it they shot a brief scene together which apparently did not make the final cut. "Many of the cast were disappointed that they had little or, in many cases, nothing to do," Zabriskie says. "There were just so many cast members that obviously not all of them could be in the movie."

One of the reasons behind a few of these glaring omissions could be standard theatrical restrictions. As with all of his projects, Lynch shot so much footage on Fire Walk With Me that the first edit was nearly five hours long. When the film was released, it had been trimmed considerably, a process which has left out such key regulars as Harry Goaz, who played the slightly slow-witted Deputy Andy. It´s been hinted, though, that some of the excised footage may find its way into a special expanded video edition next year.

"I really can´t comment very much about the movie, only because I don´t know too much about it," says Goaz. "I did not come on until very late in filming, and I only had a couple of scenes, so I wasn´t too privy to what was going on at the set." Still, he feels that this new Peaks has the potential to be "as outrageous as Wild at Heart, because as a feature film it can show as much sex, violence and nudity as the MPAA will allow.

"There was a joke going around the set calling the movie Caligula 2, and I begged David to let me do something in the ****," says Goaz. "Andy would´ve been great naked."

Since Twin Peaks has always been a place of secrets and mystery, the same rules apply, to some extent, to how much the principals want to reveal about the film itself. "I like not talking about it," says Zabriskie. "It´s easy to keep it secret when you feel you have really great stuff. I guess it would be a terrible thing if you felt nothing happened, and you still couldn´t talk about it. It´s sort of fun, because you know people would be able to discover it."

Even if the short-lived series scared viewers off because they couldn´t get into its strange characters or alternate planes of existence. Silva feels that Fire Walk With Me will be used as an enlightening tool for both fans and the uninitiated. "The movie stands on its own, and you don´t have to have followed the television series to understand the film," he notes. "There are definitely more supernatural elements."

Working on the feature became an enlightening experience for Silva as well, since he discovered that his birthday and that of Michael Anderson, who plays the little person from another place in Cooper´s dream sequences, are on the same day: Halloween. "David had no idea, and when he found out he called CNN, and we did a press conference," laughs Silva.

But last Halloween was charged with more than birthday coincidences. Since shooting went over schedule in Seattle, Laura´s death sequence in the train car off of Avenue 37 couldn´t be shot. So once they were back in Los Angeles, the crew had to film it on a soundstage during the last day of shooting: October 31.

"Five days after Halloween, in Seattle, they found the body of a girl off of Avenue 37 up towards the river, and the weird thing about it was that her name was Theresa Briggs," Silva reveals. "Theresa Banks is the first girl who gets killed, and Bobby Briggs was one of the characters in the show. And when they did an autopsy, they discovered the murder had taken place five days earlier on Halloween night, the same night we were shooting the killing of Laura Palmer on the set in LA. It was really weird stuff. Art imitates life. Life imitates art."

Oddly enough, Silva had never intended for BOB to become the icon of terror that he is today - it was a classic Lynchian accident. During shooting of Peaks´ pilot episode, Silva was working behind the scenes as propmaster. One day, while he was crouched behind Laura Palmer´s bed, Lynch caught the image and decided to make it work to his advantage.

"He said, 'You better get out of there or you´re going to be on camera,' and I think all of a sudden a blood vessel burst in his head," recalls Silva. "So there´s that shot of me at the foot of her bed, and that´s how it all started."

As for the future of Twin Peaks, Silva notes that there is a rumor that Fire Walk With Me is the first in a package of three Peaks theatrical features.

"These prequels will help people understand the supernatural thing," says Silva, adding that he´s sworn to secrecy about any directions that potential sequels might take. But despite the show´s failure in prime time, its video shelf life may be stronger than anticipated. It´s had an immensely popular afterlife on cassette, where the first seven episodes and the season premiere have sold extremely well. On top of that, Twin Peaks is a cultural phenomenon in Europe and Japan: Fire Walk With Me debuted in the latter country with the second largest opening weekend, right behind Terminator 2.

"People are fascinated by this particular slice of American pie," says Catherine Coulson, a veteran of Lynch´s Eraserhead who plays Margaret the Log Lady in both the TV and film versions. "It´s pretty fascinating, because it´s a world they know exists, but we´ve never seen it before on television or in movie theaters. It´s done well in the foreign countries because it´s captured the imaginations of people who must think they´re finding out about life in a small town in the United States.

"I know that David really loves the world of Twin Peaks and would probably keep returning if there´s a continued demand," Coulson continues. "It had its life on television, and that was a very vital one. And now David has this chance to do more, so we´ll see what happens and hope it leads to more films."



Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:15:56 pm
(http://www.glennmason.com/chat/2006tp8.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:21:38 pm
(http://www.dvdrama.com/imagescrit2/t/w/i/twinpeakslefilmhaut612.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:23:40 pm
(http://underrated.typepad.com/images/kieferissak.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:25:05 pm
(http://www.ed-wood.net/Twin9.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: Jami Ferrina on November 13, 2007, 11:29:11 pm
(http://www.ibot.cas.cz/personal/pysek/obr/twin_peaks.jpg)


Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: rockessence on November 14, 2007, 03:13:16 am
R.I.P. Jack Nance

Trailer to a film about the life and unsolved death of Jack Nance
http://www.jacknance.com/

(http://www.smartfellowspress.com/smokinggun/smokinggun2/Allusi43.jpg)(http://www.smartfellowspress.com/smokinggun/smokinggun2/Allusi55.jpg)

Erased
By Maximillian Potter
Premiere August 1997
Pages 92-95, 106-107

His role in David Lynch's "Eraserhead" made actor Jack Nance a cult-movie icon. His own life was as tortured and dark as that of the character he embodied; his death may be a mystery forever.

Jack Nance crossed the parking lot of Winchell's Doughnut House. Chances are he was drunk. Maybe still drunk, maybe already drunk. Once a recovering alcoholic, he had returned to drinking a few years earlier, hoping to numb his blood. Like his most famous film character, Henry Spencer, the man with perpetually surprised hair who cared for a not-quite-infant in David Lynch's Eraserhead, Nance watched the world and was troubled by it. He looked for happiness and meaning, but all he seemed to find was unspeakable tragedy and disappointment. Or rather, they seemed to find him.

During rush hour, the boulevard in front of Nance's nondescript lodgings in sleepy South Pasadena would clog with commuters waiting to enter the Hollywood Freeway. But at about 5 A.M. on that Sunday morning, Nance, who had recently come to rely on a real crutch as well as the emotional one, didn't need to worry about dodging traffic. Once in the parking lot of Winchell's, according to what he would tell friends, Nance, following the sweet, warm scent of fresh doughnuts, brushed by two young Hispanic men. As he was known to do when he thought someone a punk, he barked at them, something like "Why don't you two change out of those baggy clothes and go get a job?" Nance's voice always sounded low and rough, as if he gargled with ball bearings. The passerby heard the old man; neither knew him as a cult-film icon. But then, even the most die-hard cineast wouldn't have recognized him as Eraserhead. Now 53 years old, with bifocals and thinning hair matted on his head, Jack Nance looked like any other South-Pas senior. And although Nance had had roles in more than twenty movies since Eraserhead, appearing with such "kids" as Nicolas Cage and Sean Penn, under directors like Wim Wenders, Barbet Schroeder, and, of course, Lynch, those films were far from the popular mainstream; and his onscreen time in them could usually be measured in nanoseconds.

One of the men Nance had taunted slugged him in the face. His glasses went flying, he dropped his cane, and he crashed to the ground. He staggered back to his apartment and later that day - December 29, 1996 - lunched with two close friends, actress Catherine Case and screenwriter Leo Bulgarini. Case noticed the bad bruise under Nance's eye and asked what had happened.

They didn't quite believe his story. "No, really," Nance said, "That's what happened. I mouthed off and I got what I deserved."

"He wanted to make it look like he threw this kid on the ground," Bulgarini recalls. "But he didn't even have the energy to pick himself up. There's just no way he could throw a twenty-year-old on the ground. That same night, I went to the doughnut shop and I asked around and nobody knew anything." The next morning, when he returned to help Nance with his laundry, Bulgarini found the actor dead on his bathroom floor.

The coroner ruled Nance's death a homicide: subdural hematoma caused by blunt-force trauma, which was consistent with Nance's story and validated the case as murder. If Nance's attackers had no idea of who they had hit, investigator Jerome Beck did. As one might expect in Nance's Lynchian Hollywood, Beck, who looks more like a pirate behind his black eye patch than he does a detective, is also a member of the Writer's Guild He recognized Nance the moment he visited the dead actor's apartment. From the pictures on the oak-paneled wall, Beck knew this guy as Eraserhead, arguably the king of all cult characters; the face that launched the legitimately weird career of David Lynch. "Jack left me with a mystery," Beck says. "He would probably appreciate the **** out of that."

I swear to you it was fate," David Lynch says of his meeting Nance in the early ''70s and casting him in Eraserhead. "There was no rhyme or reason to it. It was just one of those beautiful things." But from the moment Nance embarked on his acting career, beautiful moments were rare. The eldest of Hoyt and Agnes Nance's three sons discovered acting while attending North Texas State University. He gave up his journalism major ' and dropped out of school in order to devote himself to the craft. "He always did things 100 percent," says his brother Richard. Nance, hooked up with the Dallas Theater Center, and, soon after, the twenty-year-old packed his dreams in a small suitcase and headed for the highly regarded Pasadena Playhouse.

When he arrived in California, he found that the Playhouse had shut down. "It wasn't like Jack to call ahead and confirm," a good friend remembers. He then moved to San Francisco. While in a stage adaptation of Kafka's Amerika at San Francisco State University, Nance met his future wife, Catherine E. Coulson. She was a student and Nance a "guest artist," recalls Coulson.

"I remember we had a friend of ours play the organ at the wedding," says Coulson. "He was going to play Bach preludes, and Jack snuck in the theme from Giant which was always kind of our joke because Jack was smaller than me. He used to say, 'If you can only get one woman, you might as well get the biggest one you can find.'"

Nance's stage career peaked in San Francisco with the title role in Tom Paine, the story of the American patriot. The production toured and enjoyed great critical success. When the play hit Los Angeles, Hollywood producers offered Nance commercials and a guest spot on Hawaii Five-O, but he refused to leave the production. At the time, he said he was Tom Paine. After Paine's run, Coulson recalls, Nance really wanted to go to Los Angeles. By the early '70s, however, the offers that seemed abundant while Paine was hot had subsided. Nance collected welfare checks, and his best acting gig was with an ensemble of struggling actors that called itself the Do-Da Gang. The troupe performed elaborate skits - essentially promotional stunts designed to get real acting jobs for its members. For one Gang performance, Nance lay in a coffin for three days. The Gang's founder, Bob Graham, remembers Nance bursting with pride when a newspaper reviewer wrongly described him as an actual dummy. I "He thought that was the greatest compliment," says Graham. Around the time Nance moved to Los Angeles, Tom Paine director David Lindemann moved to L.A. and began a fellowship at the American Film Institute. He developed a friendship with another AFI fellow named David Lynch, who was casting for his student film. Lindemann asked Nance to meet with the aspiring director.

At first the man who would be Eraserhead and the character's creator didn't much like each other. "I remember our first meeting like it was yesterday," says Lynch. "Jack had pretty long hair, it was kind of almost like an Afro. He was kind of bored. He thought the film was, like, a student thing, which it was, and he wasn't too excited about it. I picked up on this, so we had a fairly strange, uneasy meeting.

"I was walking him out to his car, and on the way we passed an old gray Volkswagen that had a wooden roof rack," Lynch says. "And Jack said, 'My God, that's a cool roof rack,' and I said, 'Well, thanks.' We started talking about wood and roof racks and I suddenly saw enthusiasm in Jack. That got us talking and before I knew it I'd invited Jack back to the house to meet my wife at the time [Peggy]. She gave me the thumbs-up when Jack wasn't looking. At that point, Jack was part of the family, and it never stopped for 25 years." Nance became a favored member of Lynch's ensemble, appearing in five of the director's seven features and as a semi regular in his short-lived TV cult item, Twin Peaks. Nance utters the first words spoken about the series' corpse of mystery, Laura Palmer: "She's dead. Wrapped in plastic." But Eraserhead was where Nance's career would begin and, in many ways, end.

In Eraserhead, Nance's Henry Spencer accepts responsibility for impregnating his girlfriend, Mary X. He welcomes his new wife and their "child" - a bizarre, discomfitting special effect - into his dingy one room apartment, and when the disfigured offspring repulses its own mother, Henry assumes the role of caregiver. Beyond that, it is impossible to offer a definitive synopsis. Henry dreams of a room in which his head pops off; a little boy picks up the head and takes it to an eraser manufacturer. At the end of the film, Henry, in a moment of impatience, mistakenly kills the creature, and then goes inside the radiator, to be united with the puffy-cheeked woman who has been serenading him from there.

Nance himself never knew, nor cared, exactly what Eraserhead meant. In an interview with the Peaks fanzine Wrapped in Plastic, Nance said: "You guys get way too deep over this business. I don't take it all that seriously. It's only a movie."

Principal photography began in May 1972, and it took almost five lean years for Lynch to finish making Eraserhead (Lynch had told Nance the project would last six weeks). Coulson was responsible for making sure her husband's hair maintained its unique look. "It required more and more grooming as his hair became thinner and thinner," Coulson says. "I would apologize and he would say, 'It could be spinach for all I care.'" Nance and Lynch each worked odd jobs to cover costs. At one point, they each had a Wall Street Journal paper route in West Los Angeles. "We picked up the papers at 11:30 P.M.," Lynch recalls. "And when I was nearly finished, Jack would still be sitting in his car, folding papers.

Lynch finally premiered Eraserhead at midnight on March 19, 1977. Variety skewered the film, calling it "a sickening bad-taste exercise." But Eraserhead piqued underground interest and the film became an almost instant cult classic. Nance's unnerving performance as Spencer is largely why the film endures and why his black-and-white image - eyes widened, expression dour but empty, hair seemingly trying to escape his scalp, framed by blackness and floating dust - is lodged in the subconscious of every connoisseur of fantastic cinema. "Early during rehearsals," Lynch recalls, "Jack was doing too much. I said, 'Jack, just give me a total blank.' And as soon as he gave the total blank, it was Henry." What made Nance the perfect Henry was the fact that Nance was Henry. He too smelled fear and anxiety in the air and preferred to hibernate in a dark room; he too assumed the role of caregiver and would be crushed by it.

Lynch rode the Eraserhead momentum to directing The Elephant Man, a major Hollywood production. He wanted Nance for the title character. "But it just wasn't in the cards," Lynch says; the role went to John Hurt. The director went to England to shoot the picture; Nance moved on to a divorce. "We were just too young," is all Coulson will say.

No one remembers when Nance began to drink. The bottle was there in San Francisco, there with the Do-Da Gang, and a couple of times during Eraserhead Lynch sent Nance back to his dressing room to sleep off the booze. Gin wound up his favorite flavor. He'd get drunk in Hollywood and sometimes end up sleeping in vacant lots. For a while his home was the same kind of shadowy room you would expect Henry to have. His roommate was a big street rat that he named John Henry. If a director wanted Nance, he or she had to find him. "He was completely unmotivated," says Lynch. "He was there in his house, ready and willing, if someone came and got him to do some work. I always had to call him." An old friend from his San Francisco days, Francis Ford Coppola, called on Nance for a supporting role in Wim Wenders's 1982 Hammett. Nance also stumbled into some bit parts, in Johnny Dangerously, City Heat, and Ghoulies. In 1984, Lynch dusted him off, and, in Nance's words, had him play a "doorstop" in the unfortunate Dune. Then a drunken, disgusted Nance hopped a train to Dallas. He later told a reporter that he had wanted "to get the hell out of L.A. forever." He wandered around his hometown like a lost puppy until Lynch tugged his leash for Blue Velvet. "I was in very bad shape, very sick," Nance once said, remembering the conversation. "I told Lynch, 'I can't not drink, but I can do the movie.'" On Blue Velvet, Nance made a decision that probably added ten years to his life.

In his costar Dennis Hopper, Nance saw someone who had battled the same demons and won. Toward the end of the shoot, during a night at the hotel bar, Nance asked Hopper to help him.

"I thought he was kidding me," Hopper recalls. "I thought he was putting me on. Then he said, 'If you don't help me, I'm going up to my room and jumping out the window.' I made some calls to Los Angeles, to a group called Studio 12, out in the Valley." Hopper got on the plane with Nance, and, as instructed, kept pouring drinks into him - anything to keep Nance happy. When Nance left Studio 12, he was sober for the first time in memory and had a new friend, Kelly Jean Van Dyke, the daughter of actor Jerry Van Dyke, best known for his role on the television series Coach. Young and rebellious, Kelly Jean was in rehab because of a substance-abuse problem.

After leaving Studio 12, Nance began acting again, returning with a character role in Barb; Hopper, now directing, found a place for Nance in Colors. To pay the bills, Nance worked as a hotel clerk, and was twice robbed at gunpoint. In 1989, his old friend Lynch cast him in Wild at Heart (which won Cannes' Palme d'or in 1990) and Twin Peaks. With his professional career on the upswing, Nance wed Van Dyke in May 1991.

The two had been romantically involved for some time. For as long as he could, Nance loved his new wife unconditionally. But she started to use again. Van Dyke also began getting work in the lower depths of the **** industry - one posthumous release was titled The Coaches [sic] Daughter as a slap in the face to her sitcom-star dad. Nance stuck by her through her slips back into substance abuse, even though being around drugs and alcohol was torture for him. "He gave her everything and tried so hard to help her," says one of Nance's close friends. After less than a year of marriage, Nance was ready to say enough.

IT HAPPENED WHILE Nance was on a lake near Yosemite, for Meatballs 4. That few can even recall the Meatballs 2 and 3 that preceded it says a good deal about the picture. But then, Nance's role was a lead; he played a grandfather trying to save his summer camp for his granddaughter.

It was November 17,1991. Nance had been considering leaving Van Dyke for a while. A rainy day on the shoot lent him more time to think. He got on the phone and told her that things were getting to the point where if he stayed around the drinking and the drugs, she might unintentionally unleash his sickness. "Don't do this to me, Jack," Van Dyke pleaded. "Don't do this. I've got to be with you. I want to be with you." He told her to stop being silly. He said he was going to hang up. "If you hang up on me, I'm going to kill myself," she said. At that instant, the storm that had been raging outside killed the phone line.

"I opened the door and there's Jack," says Bob Logan, the film's director. "He looked me straight in the face and without cracking any expression whatsoever he goes, 'I think my wife just committed suicide.' I thought he was kidding, so I said, 'Well, being married to you, Jack, who could blame her?' As soon as I said that, a tear trickles down out of his eye. He wanted to use my phone."

All of the camp phones were dead, so the two drove to the nearest police station. The lone officer on duty called the LAPD, who said they would go check out the apartment. "We sat there and waited for what seemed like an eternity," Logan says. "I had my arm around him for what turned out to be fifteen minutes or so. It's just me, Jack, and this cop on the other side of the counter. Jack was venting, crying, telling me how he felt guilty." The phone rang. "Jack was looking at the ground," Logan says. "I looked at the cop and the cop nodded sadly. He hung up the phone, walked around the counter, and he walked right in front of Jack. 'Jack,' he said. Jack looked up at him. 'She didn't make it, Jack.'"

Kelly Jean Van Dyke had hung herself.

"As soon as [he said that], I felt, I felt the life drain out of him," Logan says. "He started sobbing like a baby." A production assistant drove Nance back to L.A. Nance took his family, along with Van Dyke's father and family, out on a boat. He scattered some of her ashes on the ocean, and months later took some back to a home he had bought for his parents in Dallas. He put those remaining ashes in a room that became a shrine to his wife.

Five days after he sprinkled his wife's ashes on the Pacific, Nance returned to the set of Meatballs 4. He didn't want to leave the production hanging, Logan says; that would have been unprofessional. The first scene waiting for Nance required him to tell his granddaughter in the film how sorry he was for letting her down, for not being there when she needed him most. Logan, who had scripted the movie months before, had named the granddaughter after his own daughter, Kelly.

NANCE REMAINED SOBER for about two years after his wife's death. Then, out of the blue, he gave up. "He called me up one day and said, 'It's funny, I woke up and I knew I had to drink again. And there was no stopping me,'" says Frank Wyman, a friend of Nance's since the Do-Da Gang days.

Someone asked Hopper to intervene for a second time. Nance told his onetime savior that there was nothing he could do. He drank through two strokes and more lame parts in more lame movies. He drank through his last Lynch movie, Lost Highway, which he never got to see. As recently as last year, a director sent him home after only one day of shooting. "He was drunk when I picked him up at ll A.M.," says the producer of Joyride. "He couldn't get his seat beft fastened."

Two weeks before Nance died, Wyman went to see his broken friend. Nance started to talk about Van Dyke again, and Wyman said, "Well, Jack, you've got to start thinking about something else." And Nance blurted out, "But you know, she was four months pregnant." (Because Van Dyke's death was ruled a suicide, the coroner's office did not run tests that would have indicated whether or not she was in fact pregnant.) Wyman tried to appeal to Nance's strong belief in God to get him to stop drinking. "If you believe so much, why are you sinning so badly?" he asked. "God will forgive me," Nance replied.

AT THE TIME OF his death, Nance was working on an autobiographical screenplay called A Derelict on All Fours. According to his brother Richard, the story began by focusing on a Chihuahua named Daisy. Richard had found Daisy while he was driving by a car wreck in Oklahoma. Daisy, the lone survivor of the wreck, stood shivering in the snow. For about a year after Van Dyke's death, Jack lived with his brother and his family in Orange County, and grew incredibly attached to the dog. "Daisy was calm and gentle and had a habit of resting her head on you," Richard says. "It didn't bark, didn't spring on you. "A couple of years ago, a coyote killed it. Jack immediately began writing this thing."

"Jack was like a stray dog," says Wyman. "He liked that image of himself. Anybody that knew Jack could never get mad at him. He was just like this little puppy dog that you had to put your arm around and try to rescue."

THE CASE OF JACK NANCE's death remains open, and is likely to for quite a long time. There were no witnesses. There are no suspects. To his friends, Nance painted himself as the victim of an act of random violence. After months of investigation, one of the two officers on the case is said to be unsure that such an act even occurred.

The coroner's report indicates that Nance's blood-alcohol level was .24 percent at the time of death. His liver had been ravaged. According to a police source, an investigator on the case thinks it is more likely that Nance just got drunk and banged his head.

"Jack was a storyteller, but his stories took a long time to tell," Lynch recalls. "And many people would think he was finished before he was finished and interrupt. And Jack would never let on that he had more to say. And I always thought it was very sad because his stories were so great. The world was just a little too fast for him." To those who would characterize Jack Nance's death as "Lynchian," the man whose name inspired the term can only scoff, "Oh, that's just baloney. It's really Nanceian."

Maximillian Potter is a staffwriter at PREMIERE.

Copyright 1997 Premiere Magazine

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Title: Re: Twin Peaks
Post by: OIEAF on July 24, 2015, 10:59:05 am

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Cooper is also visited by an apparition of a mysterious Giant, who provides him with further clues in the murder investigation. All of the information that Cooper has gained from psychic and empirical means, including the mysterious utterances of an eccentric local woman known as The Log Lady, leads him to a number of suspects; but when he discovers the existence of Laura's second, secret diary, he realizes that therein lies the key to solving the mystery. Harold Smith, a local man who was one of Laura's confidants, holds this diary. The secret diary reveals that from a very early age Laura was abused by a figure called "Bob", and that her use of drugs and sex are the means she has used to numb herself and escape from him.Paris shuttle transfers (http://www.shuttle-paris-airports.com/)

On the night before she is to leave town, Maddy is brutally murdered by Laura's father, Leland, who is revealed as the man who is possessed by BOB. Cooper and Truman apprehend him, and as they interrogate the crazed Leland, it becomes clear that Leland has little to no memory of his grotesque actions while under BOB's influence. After confessing to two murders, BOB forces Leland to smash his own head against the wall of his cell. As Cooper and Truman rush to his side, Leland's memories of what he has done return to him, and in his dying moment, Leland claims to see Laura. However, as Cooper and the others note, if BOB has truly left Leland's body, it means his spirit is now loose in the woods of Twin Peaks. This is the end of the second season.

At the begining of Season 3, with the murder investigation concluded, Cooper is then all set to leave Twin Peaks when he is framed for drug trafficking by the criminal Jean Renault, and is temporarily suspended from the FBI. Renault holds Cooper responsible for the death of his brother Jacques, who was murdered by a grieving Leland Palmer when Jacques was under suspicion for Laura's murder.



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In the event that we take a gander at the sunlight based twin tops of the sun oriented most extreme in the 1950s it appears that this likewise was held to be a fairly extensive dangerous Hurricane period around 1955. There is a plausibility that the expanded number of sun powered tempests warmed up the surface water temps in the Caribbean and Atlantic. This would mean more vanishing and subsequently, more blockage of the exchange winds permitting the Hurricanes to become greater than normal, along these lines, more days in development, better arrangement, and in this manner, greater and more savage tempests. This obviously is my hypothesis, yet time will tel