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Ancient European Cultures => Balkan History => Topic started by: Cassandra on May 28, 2007, 09:28:25 pm



Title: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on May 28, 2007, 09:28:25 pm
Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings Larger than Believed - Expert


28 May 2007, Monday

The valley of Bulgaria's Thracian kings may be larger than believed and its extent may touch even the town of Sliven's borders, the famous Bulgarian archaeologist Professor Georgi Kitov said Monday.

Professor Kitov's team of scientists and archaeologists will start excavations of 15 Thracian tumuli in mid July as according to their preliminary research they contain many unique artefacts.

"All of the tumuli have been already pillaged by treasures hunters, but I really hope they did not know what to look for," Professor Kitov said.

It is expected that the excavations continue three months and they will cost around BGN 200 000.

At the end of June a team of the Discovery Channel will come to Bulgaria to make a documentary for the excavations.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=81191


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on May 28, 2007, 09:33:31 pm
 
 
The mysteries of the Valley of Thracian Kings

The earliest traces of human presence in the environs of the town of Kazanluk in Central Bulgaria date back to the Neolithic age, i.e. 6th-5th millennium B.C. In latter years the Thracians settled permanently in those lands. A vestige of their advanced civilization are the numerous mounds, in which archaeologists discovered ancient sanctuaries or royal burials. The latter artifacts have brought the name of Valley of Thracian Kings. 
More than two millennia ago Thracian tribes founded their first settlements on the banks of the river Tundzha in the environs of present-day town of Kazanluk. In the 4th-3rd c. B.C. they founded the city of Seuthopolis that became the capital of the state of the Odrisi tribe. This period is characterized by huge monolithic cult complexes, where the Thracians used to bury their kings. Thus with the years, the valley locked between the steep slopes of the Balkan Range and the wavy plateau of Sredna gora mountain range became a mausoleum in the open air of sorts similar to the Egyptian Valley of Kings along the Nile. For the time being archaeologists have studied more than 20 of the mounds in the region. The golden jewels and exquisitely crafted objects shed new light on the livelihood and beliefs of the ancient Thracians. Thracian believed in afterlife, that is why they wept bitterly whenever a child was born into this world, and rejoiced and celebrated with ostentatious rituals a person’s death. The royal burials for instance lasted for three full days. The first day had been dedicated to sacrificial offerings at the tomb’s entrance; the second day was devoted to sports events and chariot races, and it was not until the third day that the defunct king had been seen off to the netherworld with a rich meal and plenty of song and dance.
The most famous among those tombs is the Kazanluk tomb, a UNESCO cultural monument dated back to the 4th-3rd c. B.C. it is the only kind in Europe with preserved murals. In a nearby mound in 1992 archaeologists came across a peculiar phenomenon: a false burial used to mislead treasure hunters even at that time, for they had been well aware of the looters of tombs and royal burials who were pestering the region.
In 1993 in the Ostrusha mound the scientists unearthed a rich cult from the 5th c. B.C. built into a 40 t monolith. The ceiling carved in reliefs and replicas of people, plants and animals. “When the Christian faith first came to our lands in the 4th-6th c. A.D. the Christians destroyed many of the marvellous mural as they considered them pagan vestige. In 2004 archaeologists dug out a golden mask weighing almost 700 g, which was thought to belong to King Teres, the founder of the Odrisi Kingdom. Among other items the experts have come across golden and silver articles and horse harness, swords, spears and two huge amphorae filled with wine to the brink. It is interesting to note that initially the tombs used to be sanctuaries where religious services and sacrificial offerings had been performed, but later when the king or the priest died they became mausoleums. In the summer of 2005 archaeologists unearthed the mausoleum of King Seuthes III, founder of the city of Seuthopolis.
“King Seuthes III died in combat in the environs of hic capital. But was buried outside the boundaries of the Odrisi Kingdom. That is why the burial mound contained only personal effects that the king might need in his afterlife. The Thracians had managed to build a burial chamber at the back of the sanctuary out of stone block weighing some 60t and sealed by a 20 t stone lid. We can’t keep wondering how the ancient had carried the huge blocks from the quarries of Sredna gora mountain range,” Kosta Zarev, director of the Museum of History in Kazanluk exclaims.

Written by Veneta Nickolova
English version by Radostin Zhelev

 (http://www.bnr.bg/NR/rdonlyres/AD276E39-000C-446F-B698-2C081B1178A4/0/dolina_tsare.jpg)

http://www.bnr.bg/RadioBulgaria/Emission_English/Theme_History_And_Religion/Material/Thrvalley.htm



Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: rockessence on May 29, 2007, 12:54:12 am
More pics from the Thracian Valley of Kings:

(http://www.ancient-bulgaria.com/images/sveshtari_thracian_tomb_inside.jpg)

(http://www.ancient-bulgaria.com/images/Rogozen_treasure1.jpg)
Here is a "Golden Bock" or buck-goat, indicative of the king/breeder...
"The biggest find of it’s kind, amassed by the Triballoi {Triballi} from the 5th. century BC to the middle of the 4th. century BC. discovered in the winter of 1985/86 in northwest Bulgaria, the gorgeous Thracian Treasure from Rogozen is the largest single collection of ancient treasure ever found in Europe."
http://www.ancient-bulgaria.com/category/archaeology/treasure/page/2/

(http://www.bitsofnews.com/images/graphics/Thracian_gold_earring.jpg)
Earring, one of a pair...most likely depicting Apollo.







Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on June 16, 2007, 04:05:17 am
Nice work, Rockessence!  I especially like the temple picture.
May I ask how you became so interested in the Thracians?  I have some Bulgarian blood in me so it has always been a fascination of mine.


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: rockessence on June 23, 2007, 01:26:11 am
Cassandra,

I guess my interest stems from the parallels to the information presented in the Bock saga....


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 01, 2007, 05:22:18 am
Does the Bock Saga mention the Thracians, or even Bulgaria?


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 01, 2007, 05:23:19 am
Sarcophagus, Unique Gold Jewellery Unearthed in Bulgaria


28 June 2007, Thursday

Bulgarian archaeologists have found Thursday a stone sarcophagus full of unique gold jewellery and ceramic and glass utensils in a mound near the village of Stroyno.

The cremated bones of a woman, who was buried in 1st - 2nd century, were placed in the sarcophagus.

The archaeologist Daniela Agre claims that was a unreal typical for the richest families in the Roman Era.

The team of Professor Agre, who are doing excavation works in the area, stumbled upon the unique artefacts while researching the so called Raykova mound.

They hope the relics of the eminent person the mound was made for will be discovered in few days.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=82412


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 03, 2007, 01:33:15 am
5000-Year-Old Golden Architectural Decoration Unearthed in Bulgaria


2 July 2007, Monday

A team of archaeologist of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum unearthed Monday a 5000-years-old golden architectural ornamentation near the village of Dabene.

While carrying out excavations of small prehistoric moulds, archaeologist Martin Hristov also discovered well-preserved wall ornamentation details in the form of spirals, which are made of tubules of pure gold. Those spirals are unique artifacts compared to all prehistoric ones found in Bulgaria until now.

In the middle of the mound Hristov unearthed eight different pottery objects, hidden in a hole and covered with stones.

The excavations continue and the archaeologists strongly believe they will find many other interesting objects that will provide them with information for the people who inhabited these lands in the ancient times.

The fresh findings show that the population of these lands was well ahead in the civilization process and used precise and sophisticated technologies in the production of objects, especially golden ones.

Meanwhile, the archaeologists have now solid ground on which to base their previous hypothesis that the mines and the production center of objects of gold and their art processing was situated on the territory of today's Bulgaria, just next to the Dabene village.

Hristov's team of archaeologists has unearthed more than 25 000 golden elements and objects during excavations in previous years at the same place, all of them dated back to the 3rd century BC.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=82541


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 09, 2007, 01:28:21 am
Bulgarian Archaeologists Find Roman-era Items in Thracian Tomb


7 July 2007, Saturday


(http://www.novinite.com/media/images/2007-07/big_82730.jpg)

Georgi Kitov's excavations will end in September and cost BGN 200 000. File photo by Yuliana Nikolova (Sofia Photo Agency)


The excavations of Bulgaria's best-known archaeologist Georgi Kitov near Sliven have yielded yet more artifacts, this time from the Roman era, state radio BNR reported on Saturday.

The latest finds include two pairs of gold earrings, five rings, a ritual coin and a semi-precious stone, all found in a tomb dating to the first century AD, at the earliest.

All the items were found in the second of the 14 tombs Kitov plans to excavate this summer near the villages of Topolchane and Kaloyanovo in the Sliven region, southeastern Bulgaria.


The finds will be handed over to Sliven's history museum.

The area is known as the "Thracian Kings Valley", which Kitov believes to be larger than it was initially thought.

Kitov, who is dubbed the "Bulgarian Indiana Jones", has also invited the Discovery Channel to shoot a documentary of the three-month excavations.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=82730


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 11, 2007, 02:28:00 am
New Rare and Unique Finds Found in Perperikon

Updated on: 10.07.2007, 16:11
Published on: 10.07.2007, 15:45

©

(http://images.ibox.bg/2007/07/10/%ED%E0%F5%EE%E4%EA%E0%20%EF%E5%F0%EF%E5%F0%E8%EA%EE%ED/519x756.jpg)


Author: Blaga Bangieva


Two ceramic animal heads with enormous importance were found in the latest excavations in Perperikon, reported the archaeologist professor Nikolai Ovcharov.
On of the heads represents a dragon head with open mouth and mane, and the other one is broken head of cobra, painted in aggressive pose also with open mouth.

Ovcharov explained that the finds date from 3-1 c.B.C., which means that are from the ‘Tsepina' culture - archaeologist term, connected with fortress in Western Rhodopes, where actually ware found the first excavations from this culture.

The discovery of a cobra head is very unique because the snake is the guard of the land's debts, cult directly connected with the Thracian god Dionysius, which sanctuary is now under examination in Perperikon.

Another third palace is expected to be found soon.


http://international.ibox.bg/news/id_1963793751


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 15, 2007, 10:04:19 pm
Bulgarian Gold Rush Continues with Unique Gold Ring


15 July 2007, Sunday

The excavations of Bulgaria's best-known archaeologist Georgi Kitov have yielded a second major find in as many days on Sunday.

After announcing the discovery of a golden mask and silver rhyton in a Thracian tomb on Saturday, Kitov is now making headlines after unearthing a massive gold ring, bearing the image of a bearded man.

Found in the same tomb, it also has an inscription, "Saviour of Asia" written in Greek, and is no less important a find than the gold mask, Kitov said.

The tomb appears to have belonged to a mighty Thracian chieftain, said Kitov, often dubbed the Bulgarian Indiana Jones.

Three years ago Kitov caused a furore after discovering one of the most sensational finds for Bulgaria's archaeologists ever - a 2,500-year-old unique gold mask, believed to depict the face of ancient Thracian king.

He is now excavating 14 tombs near the villages of Topolchane and Kaloyanovo in the Sliven region, southeastern Bulgaria.

The area is known as the "Thracian Kings Valley", which Kitov believes to be larger than it was initially thought.

The finds will be handed over to Sliven's history museum, while a Discovery Channel team is due to shoot a documentary of the three-month excavations.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=83046


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 15, 2007, 10:05:43 pm
Gold mask from Thracian period found in Bulgaria
 
 
 
16 July 2007 | 00:06 | FOCUS News Agency
 
 
 
SOFIA. A Bulgarian archaeologist announced Sunday that his team had found a gold mask that belonged to a Thracian king in the fourth century BC, near the eastern town of Sliven.
"The discovery of this mask proves that the Valley of the Thracian Kings stretches from the centre of Bulgaria to the east of the country," archaeologist Georgy Kitov told AFP.
The Thracians lived in southeastern Europe, the Carpathians and the Caucasus from about 4,000 BC to the third century AD.
Numerous artefacts from their leaders have been found in the so-called Valley of the Thracian Kings, located between the Balkan and the Sredna Gora mountain chains.
In 2004, Kitov's team found another gold mask from the fifth century BC near Chipka, in central Bulgaria.
The latest find, lighter and 23 centimetres (9 inches) in diametre, depicts a bearded man with a large nose and closed eyes and "was supposed to be attached to a shield," Kitov said.
The Thracian tomb in which the mask was found also contained a 30-centimetre-long silver vase shaped like a doe's head, a helmet and armour, two golden cups and various bronze and clay vessels.
Bulgaria is the birthplace of the ancient Thracian civilisation and vestiges from thousands of different sites remain unexplored.
Since 2000, archaeologists have made several important finds, including the largest Thracian sanctuary ever discovered dating back to the fifth or fourth century BC in Starossel, near Plovdiv, and the palace-sanctuary of a Thracian king in Perperikon, in the southern Rhodope mountains.
 
http://www.focus-fen.net/index.php?id=n117274


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: rockessence on July 16, 2007, 01:49:56 am
(http://www.bnr.bg/NR/rdonlyres/CC8A6381-9763-493B-AC2C-CF7DF11AC999/0/thracian_king_zlatinitsa.jpg)

(http://www.homes4ubulgaria.com/bulgaria/topics/treasure_clip_image001_0016.jpg)

(http://www.homes4ubulgaria.com/bulgaria/topics/treasure_clip_image001_0005.jpg)

(http://www.theage.com.au/ffximage/2004/09/24/gold_mask_wideweb__430x362.jpg)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 18, 2007, 01:21:23 am
Nice job on getting the pictures!  Here's some more:

(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42191000/jpg/_42191514_thracian_gold_afp416b.jpg)

(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40510000/jpg/_40510211_1bookletafp203.jpg) (http://www.homes4ubulgaria.com/bulgaria/topics/treasure_clip_image001.jpg)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 18, 2007, 01:23:52 am
(http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/All%20Web%20Images/Divine%20Marriage.jpg) (http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/img/palaeo/thraciangold180805.jpg) (http://www.goldensands.bg/cultural/images/panag-024.jpg) (http://www.kah-bonn.de/ausstellungen/thraker/p/014_pegasus350.jpg)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 18, 2007, 01:27:15 am
(http://www.kroraina.com/thracia/hb/vylchitryn_treasure.jpg) (http://www.kroraina.com/thracia/sv/photo_3006_pic_17772_big.jpg)  (http://www.archaeology.org/0503/abstracts/thumbnails/kitov2.gif)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 18, 2007, 01:28:17 am
(http://www.geocities.com/panagurishte/images/gold/treasure-.jpg)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 18, 2007, 01:30:40 am
(http://www.iladesign.com/Media/mar/64.JPG) (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/graphics/2005/07/26/wtomb26.jpg) (http://www.bnr.bg/NR/rdonlyres/CC8A6381-9763-493B-AC2C-CF7DF11AC999/0/thracian_king_zlatinitsa.jpg) (http://msnbcmedia1.msn.com/j/ap/sof10107251002.hmedium.jpg)


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 21, 2007, 01:08:00 am
ARCHAEOLOGISTS SPECULATE THAT RING FOUND IN BULGARIA BELONGED TO THRACIAN KING TERES II
09:01 Wed 18 Jul 2007
 
The solid gold ring found in a Thracian mound near Sliven on July 15 2007 by archaeologists most probably belonged to Thracian King Teres II, expedition member Yordanka Radancheva said.

King Teres II ruled from 350-341 BCE.

The ring, which has a Greek inscription and the likeness of a man, probably doubled as a seal, Bulgarian news agency BTA said.

The inscription was initially deciphered to read “The Saviour of Asia”.

Two silver centaurs and a sword that belonged to the interred person were also found at the site. Most of the artifacts found at the site are ornate, which suggests that the people buried there were aristocrats.

Archaeologists see the results of recent excavations as evidence that the Valley of Thracian Kings extends eastward from the Kazanluk area into the Sliven area.

The burial has been initially dated to the fourth century BCE, though some of the artifacts may have been made at an earlier date.

 http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/archaeologists-speculate-that-ring-found-in-bulgaria-belonged-to-thracian-king-teres-ii/id_23865/catid_70


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 25, 2007, 01:21:58 am
ANOTHER UNIQUE ARCHAEOLOGICAL DISCOVERY IN BULGARIA
12:02 Tue 24 Jul 2007

 
Archaeologists found a Thracian vessel in the shape of a horse head in a funeral mound near the town of Sliven.

The workmanship was especially precise, Focus news agency reported.

The horse’s accoutrements and a labris (double axe) were represented on the vessel. Focus said that the labris was a symbol of royal power in Thrace.

Georgi Kitov, head of the archaeological expedition, said that the vessel was unique from a scientific point of view. The labris proved the vessel was owned by a Thracian king.

Only half a body was found in the tomb, showing that the deceased was a follower of Orpheus, Kitov said.

Amphoras, clay vessels of various sizes and bronze pitchers were also found in the two tombs under the hill.

http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/archaeologists-speculate-that-ring-found-in-bulgaria-belonged-to-thracian-king-teres-ii/id_23865/catid_70


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 25, 2007, 01:24:35 am
ARCHAEOLOGISTS SPECULATE THAT RING FOUND IN BULGARIA BELONGED TO THRACIAN KING TERES II
09:01 Wed 18 Jul 2007

 
The solid gold ring found in a Thracian mound near Sliven on July 15 2007 by archaeologists most probably belonged to Thracian King Teres II, expedition member Yordanka Radancheva said.

King Teres II ruled from 350-341 BCE.

The ring, which has a Greek inscription and the likeness of a man, probably doubled as a seal, Bulgarian news agency BTA said.

The inscription was initially deciphered to read “The Saviour of Asia”.

Two silver centaurs and a sword that belonged to the interred person were also found at the site. Most of the artifacts found at the site are ornate, which suggests that the people buried there were aristocrats.

Archaeologists see the results of recent excavations as evidence that the Valley of Thracian Kings extends eastward from the Kazanluk area into the Sliven area.

The burial has been initially dated to the fourth century BCE, though some of the artifacts may have been made at an earlier date.

 


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on July 30, 2007, 03:19:59 am
14 ROMAN-ERA GOLD COINS FOUND NEAR BULGARIA’S PESHTERA
14:08 Mon 23 Jul 2007

 
Archaeologists examining a Roman fortress near the Bulgarian town of Peshtera have found 14 gold coins dating back to the sixth century.

The coins were found at the bottom of a granary near a basilica, Focus news agency reported.

Local history museum director Dimitar Pavlov said that the coins might have been hidden when the Slavs attacked and captured the fortress.

The dig in Peshtera has so far uncovered numerous bronze and silver coins, silver pendants and various ceramic objects, Focus said.

The artifacts are to be kept either in the local museum or at the National Museum of History

http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/14-roman-era-gold-coins-found-near-bulgarias-peshtera/id_23962/catid_70


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 03, 2007, 12:45:36 am
Shop assistant wore ancient necklace  

Archaeologists have found a valuable ancient gold necklace being worn by a cashier in a Bulgarian grocery after it was dug up by her husband.

Boris Todorov, 43, from Karlovo in Bulgaria dug up hundreds of fine gold rings from a field on his farm and put them together to make a gift for his wife.

But it was spotted by a group of archaeologists from the Bulgarian National Museum of History who were passing through - and went into her shop to buy provisions.

They immediately identified the necklace as extremely valuable and now say it dates back to 3,000 years BC.

Prof Bozhidar Dimitrov, Director of the Bulgarian National Museum of History, said: "They almost passed out when they saw what the woman was wearing. It is a stunning discovery."

Experts believe a local civilisation buried jewels in fields as part of an elaborate prayer ritual.

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2444085.html



Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 07, 2007, 11:58:36 pm
Bulgarian Archaeologists Unearth 2,500-Years-Old Tomb


7 August 2007, Tuesday

Archaeologists from the Bulgaria's National History Museum have unearthed a tomb of a citizen, who lived in the ancient city of Apollonia, which is today's Black Sea town of Sozopol.

The team of Krastina Panayotova is working on the Harmani beach of Sozopol, a site which archaeologist have been exploring for many years now. During regular excavations Panayotova's team stumbled upon the tomb.

When the scientist opened it they found many pottery, the skeleton of a man, who lived some 2,500 years ago and a huge ceramic bowl with an inscription in ancient Greek.

The bowl has been already taken for a thorough expertise and a team of linguists was called to decipher the inscription. When this is done, the Head of the Museum Bozhidar Dimitrov hopes the scientists will get a further understanding of Apollonia Pontica - the first democratic state in the lands of today's Bulgaria.

The interesting thing for this artefact is that it was unearthed in the family part of the necropolis, where Histiyani, the tyrant of Milet, was buried.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=83923


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 18, 2007, 03:04:30 am
Yet Another Ancient Tomb Unearthed in Bulgaria's Sozopol


14 August 2007, Tuesday

A team of Bulgarian archaeologists unearthed Tuesday an ancient stone tomb, dated back to the 4th century BC, Darik News reported.

The team, lead by Krastina Panayotova, stumbled upon the tomb during the annual archaeological excavations on the Harmani beach of the Black Sea town of Sozopol.

A man, probably an athlete, had been buried in the tomb because the team found an object used by athletes in antiquity.

Just a day earlier the archaeologists came upon the grave of another man, probably a gambler. The grave was full of dice, backgammon pieces and coins.

Last week the same team unearthed a tomb of a citizen, who lived in the ancient city of Apollonia, which is today's Sozopol.

The team of Krastina Panayotova is working on the Harmani beach of Sozopol, a site which archaeologist have been exploring for many years now.

Sozopol is one of the oldest towns on Bulgarian Thrace's Black Sea coast. The first settlement on the site dates back to the Bronze Age. Undersea explorations in the region of the port reveal relics of dwellings, ceramic pottery, stone and bone tools from that era. Many anchors from the second and first millennium BC have been discovered in the town's bay, a proof of active shipping since ancient times.

The town, at first called Antheia, was colonized by Anaximander. The name was soon changed to Apollonia, on account of a temple dedicated to Apollo in the town, containing a famous colossal statue of the god by Calamis, 30 cubits high, transported later to Rome by Lucullus and placed in the Capitol. At various times, Apollonia was known as Apollonia Pontica (that is, Apollonia on the Black Sea, the ancient Pontus Euxinus) and Apollonia Magna.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=84199


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 18, 2007, 03:08:10 am
Bulgaria Discovers Biggest Ancient Water Tank on the Balkans

17 August 2007, Friday


The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza. Photo by www.bulgariancastles.com
Bulgarian archaeologists announced they have discovered the biggest ancient tank for storing water on the Balkans, etched into the rock sanctuary of Perperikon, near Kardzhali in southern Bulgaria.

Top archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov, who unearthed the water tank to add it to the long list of exciting finds from the rock sanctuary, says the discovery proves that there were times when Perperikon was densely populated and with huge water supplies.

The tank, measuring twelve-meter-long, six-meter-wide and six-meter-deep, has a capacity of 432 000 litres.

It was just last month that Ovcharov showed the press two unique ceramic figurines of a cobra, dragon heads and a throne with an upright phallus that were discovered at the rock sanctuary of Perperikon.

The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza.


http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=84290


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 18, 2007, 03:09:27 am
Bulgaria Discovers Biggest Ancient Water Tank on the Balkans

(http://www.novinite.com/media/images/2007-08/big_84290.jpg)

The city of Perperikon has been inhabited since around 5000 BC, while a nearby shrine dedicated to Orpheus, near the village of Tatul, dates back to 6000 BC and is older than the Pyramids of Giza. Photo by www.bulgariancastles.com


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: rockessence on August 18, 2007, 11:42:01 am
Still no sightings of the phallus throne!


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 26, 2007, 07:24:58 am
I'll say, it better be worth the wait! Why do you suppose they are keeping it from us?


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: rockessence on August 26, 2007, 11:15:10 am
Maybe because everyone will want one?


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on August 30, 2007, 03:38:29 am
That's true, they probably would! 

Still not on there, a pity.


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on September 06, 2007, 02:59:10 am
ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND BULGARIA'S OLDEST NECROPOLIS NEAR BALCHIK
12:28 Mon 03 Sep 2007
 
Archaeologists found the oldest necropolis discovered so far in Bulgaria. The discovery was made near the coastal town of Balchik.

The necropolis dates back to the time of Asparuh, the Bulgarian ruler from the second half of the 7th century, Sofia's archaeological museum representative Lyudmila Doncheva said. What makes the necropolis impressive are its large number and the variety of ceramic artifacts.

The ceramic artifacts and metal buckles found in the necropolis proved that it was built in the first decades after the Bulgarian state was established.

The necropolis contains both corpses were either buried others that were burned. In many cases people had buried animals together with the human bodies.

The location of the necropolis is on the territory of a military base near Balchik and that is why it remained unaffected by treasure-hunters.

Proto-Bulgaria necropolises were also found in Devnya, Topola, Hitovo, Novi Pazar.

http://www.sofiaecho.com/article/archaeologists-find-bulgarias-oldest-necropolis-near-balchik/id_24701/catid_70


Title: Re: Bulgaria's Valley of Thracian Kings
Post by: Cassandra on September 18, 2007, 01:23:38 am
Yet Another Thracian Tomb Unearthed in Bulgarian Village

17 September 2007, Monday

Bulgarian archaeologists unearthed an ancient Thracian tomb during the weekend while making urgent excavations near the village of Cherniche.

The team of Georgi Nehrizov, a specialist in Thracian history and culture with the Bulgarian Archaeology Institute, stumbled absolutely accidentally on the tomb.

The sepulchre is dated back to the 4-3 century BC. The burial chamber with two-slope surface of the walls is completely intact. It is 2 metres long, 1,8 metres wide and 2 metres high.

The antechamber was destroyed by treasure hunters, which had obviously tried to penetrate the tomb with a digger.

Specialists from the Archaeology Institute have already arrived on the spot to make further research and discuss how to best preserve the finding.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=85385